Easter Cactus - Rhipsalidopsis gaertneri
Easter Cactus - Rhipsalidopsis gaertneri
Easter Cactus - Rhipsalidopsis gaertneri
Easter Cactus - Rhipsalidopsis gaertneri
Easter Cactus - Rhipsalidopsis gaertneri
Easter Cactus - Rhipsalidopsis gaertneri
Easter Cactus - Rhipsalidopsis gaertneri
Easter Cactus - Rhipsalidopsis gaertneri
Easter Cactus - Rhipsalidopsis gaertneri

If you want to add some color to your home or garden in the spring, the Easter cactus, also known as Rhipsalidopsis gaertneri, is a great choice, especially around the Easter holiday, when this tropical cactus is noted for its magnificent and prolific star-shaped blooms. Native to Brazil, it is also known as the spring cactus.

One of the distinguishing features of the Easter cactus is its flattened stem segments, which are often referred to as leaves. These segments are typically smooth and have serrated edges, giving the cactus a more delicate appearance compared to other holiday cacti like Thanksgiving cactus or Christmas cactus. The stem segments are also arranged in a cascading manner, creating an attractive hanging or trailing effect.

Furthermore, the Easter cactus is frequently confused with the Easter lily cacti (Echinopsis oxygona). While they both have the word "Easter" in their names, they are not related.

Easter Cactus Flowering – Blooming Tips

The flowers of the Easter cactus family offer a wide range of options. Along with its pink, white, and red Easter cactus varieties, it has another eye-catching variety known as the orange Easter cactus, which has beautiful orange flowers. The flowers are usually tubular in shape and have multiple layers of petals, creating a beautiful and intricate display. The blooms typically last for several weeks, almost throughout March and April, adding a burst of color and beauty to any space.

The Easter cactus blooms in response to changes in light and temperature. As the days get shorter and the temperatures cool down, it signals the plant to produce buds and, eventually flowers. So, the combination of shorter days and cooler temperatures triggers the Easter cactus to bloom.

To ensure optimal blooming, stop fertilizing two months before the spring blooming period. Keep the cactus cool at 50 degrees Fahrenheit at night and warm during the day, but avoid placing it in direct sunlight or near a heater.

After the blooming period, prepare for next year's flowering by cutting back on watering until mid-winter, which will initiate the dark and light process again, promoting prolific blooming in early spring.

Watering Needs

When it comes to watering the Easter cactus, it's important to find the right balance. It needs a bit more watering as compared to other regular cacti and prefers to be kept evenly moist during its active growing season, which is usually in the spring and summer. So, you'll want to make sure the soil is moist but not soaking wet. Give it a good watering, allowing the water to drain out completely, and then let the top 2 inches or so of the soil dry out before watering again. Remember, overwatering can be a big no-no for the Rhipsalidopsis gaertneri Easter cactus, as it can lead to root rot.

During its dormant period in the late fall and early winter, the Easter cactus doesn't need as much water. It's best to let the potting soil dry out slightly between waterings. You can reduce the frequency of watering during this time but still keep an eye on the moisture level. It's always a good idea to check the soil with your finger to see if it's dry before giving it a drink. Don't forget that proper drainage is important, so make sure your clay pots have drainage holes to prevent water from sitting in the bottom.

Light Requirement

When it comes to light requirements, the Easter cactus are great houseplants, as they can handle a wide variety of bright, indirect light. The Easter cactus grows naturally in areas that are partially shaded from the sun because it is an understory holiday plant in its native forests. Rhipsalidopsis gaertneri thrives in a spot where it receives bright, filtered sunlight for a few hours a day. Avoid placing it in direct sunlight, as this can scorch the leaves. A great spot for your Easter cactus could be near a window with a sheer curtain or in a well-lit room with plenty of natural, bright light.

If you notice that your Brazilian forest cactus—Easter cactus—isn't blooming as much or that its growth seems stunted, it might be an indication that it needs more light. On the other hand, if the leaves start to turn yellow or pale, it could be a sign that it's getting too much direct sunlight. Remember, finding the right balance of light is key to keeping your Easter cactus happy and healthy!

Optimal Soil & Fertilizer Needs

Native to Brazil's rainforests, Rhipsalidopsis gaertneri Easter cacti are epiphytic cacti. In its natural environment, an Easter cactus is an epiphyte, meaning that it grows on rocks, trees, and other plants rather than in soil. Although Easter cacti are usually planted in soil as houseplants, they need loose potting mixes that give their roots enough air to breathe. They cannot thrive in dense, compacted soil. Instead, make or buy a soil-nutrient-rich, well-draining potting mix, or ideally, use our specialized cactus potting mix that contains 5 natural substrates and mycorrhizae to promote the development of a strong root system that helps your Rhipsalidopsis cactus thrive.

As for fertilizer, the Easter cactus benefits from a balanced (5-10-5) NPK, water-soluble fertilizer formulated for cacti. During the active growing season in spring, you can fertilize your Easter cactus about once a year. However, during its dormant period in late fall and winter, it's best to hold off on fertilizing as Rhipsalidopsis gaertneri is not actively growing.

Remember, it's important not to over-fertilize your Easter cactus, as this can cause fertilizer to burn and damage the roots. Always err on the side of caution and follow the recommended dosage. With the right soil and proper fertilization, your holiday plants will thrive and reward you with beautiful blooms!

General Tips for Growing an Easter Cactus

  1. Find a bright spot but avoid direct sunlight.
  2. Water it when the top 2 inches of soil feels dry.
  3. Keep the temperature between 60 to 70 degrees Fahrenheit.
  4. The Easter cactus blooms because of changes in light and temperature, signaling the plant to produce buds and flowers.
  5. To ensure optimal blooming, stop fertilizing two months before spring and keep the cactus cool and warm.
  6. Fertilize once a year during the growing season.
  7. Prune after blooming to encourage bushier growth.

Hardiness Zone & More

The Easter cactus is a versatile plant that can thrive both indoors and outdoors. When grown indoors, it prefers a moderate temperature range of 60 to 70 degrees Fahrenheit. However, if you decide to grow it outdoors, it is important to consider the USDA hardiness zone. The Easter cactus is typically suitable for USDA zones 10 to 11, which include regions with mild winters and warm climates. Unlike desert cacti, they prefer temperatures between 60 and 75°F during the day and slightly cooler temperatures at night. It's important to avoid exposing the Easter cactus to temperatures below 50°F, as this can cause damage to the Easter plant Rhipsalidopsis gaertneri.

When it comes to humidity, the Easter cactus enjoys moderate humidity levels. It can tolerate average indoor humidity, but it's best to avoid placing it in areas with high humidity, such as near a bathroom or kitchen. If you live in a particularly dry climate, you can increase the humidity around your Easter cactus by placing a tray filled with water and pebbles near the plant or using a humidifier.

Propagating Easter Cactus

For Easter cacti, you can take stem cuttings or seeds. Simply cut a healthy segment of the cactus stem and let it dry for a few days. Then, you can grow an Easter cactus by cutting it in well-draining soil and keeping it lightly moist. With time, roots will develop, and you'll have a new Easter cactus to enjoy or share with others!

Pruning Easter Cactus

To encourage busier growth, pruning is an important step in caring for Easter cacti. By trimming back the stems, you can help the plant develop a fuller and more compact shape. Start by identifying any long, leggy stems or branches that are growing outward. Using clean and sharp pruning shears, make clean cuts just above a segment joint or node. This will promote new growth from that point and encourage a bushier appearance. It's best to prune Easter cacti after they finish blooming, typically in spring or early summer. Remember to remove any dead or damaged stems as well to maintain the overall health of the plant.

Overall, the Easter cactus, Rhipsalidopsis gaertneri is a stunning plant that brings a touch of elegance and beauty to any home or garden. Its unique appearance, vibrant flowers, and relatively easy-care requirements make it a popular choice among cactus enthusiasts and plant lovers alike. Whether you're celebrating Easter or simply looking for a striking and low-maintenance plant, the Easter cactus is definitely worth considering. Order your very own Rhipsalidopsis gaertneri Easter cactus for sale today!

Bloom Season Spring
Botanical Name Rhipsalidopsis gaertneri
Common Name Easter cactus, spring cactus
Dormancy Winter
Family Cactaceae
Flower Color Pink
Genus Rhipsalidopsis
Growth Habit Hanging, Trailing
Growth Rate Slow
Hardiness Zone 10, 11, 12
Mature Size Up to 2 ft. tall, 2 ft. wide
Native Area Brazil
Plant Type Perennial cactus
Propagation By stem cuttings, seeds
Resistance Drought tolerant, pest resistance, mild frost tolerant
Soil PH 6.5, Acidic, Neutral
Soil Type specialized cactus potting mix
Special Features Showy flowers
Sun Exposure Full sun, partial shade
Toxicity Safe for humans, mildly toxic for dogs and cats
Watering Needs Low

Pests & Common Problems of Easter Cactus

Easter cacti are generally hardy plants, but they can still fall victim to a few common pests and problems. Here are some common pests and problems that these epiphytic cacti may encounter: 

Mealybugs: These little white insects can harm a plant by becoming infested. To get rid of them, use rubbing alcohol or insecticidal soap.

Root rot: Root rot can result from either overwatering or poorly draining soil. Make sure the soil drains properly, and don't water it too much.

Fungal diseases: Excessive moisture can also result in fungal diseases like powdery mildew. Maintain good air circulation and avoid getting water on the leaves.

Lack of blooms: If an Easter cactus isn't blooming, it may be due to insufficient light or improper temperature. Ensure it gets enough bright, indirect light and cool temperatures during the bud formation and bloom period. 

Leaf drop: Your easter cactus can drop leaves for a variety of reasons, including overwatering, underwatering, or exposure to extreme temperatures. If you notice your plant dropping leaves, it's important to identify the underlying cause and take steps to correct it. 

Yellowing leaves: You might need to repot your easter cactus plant. If the easter cactus leaves become yellow, it could be a sign that the soil is not draining adequately. After checking for root rot, repot. 

FAQs - Easter Cactus Plant

What is the difference between an Easter and Christmas cactus? 

Easter cacti and Christmas cacti are both types of holiday cacti that differ in their flowering time. The Christmas cactus (Schlumbergera bridgesii), as its name suggests, typically blooms in late fall or early winter, which is perfect for adding festive cheer to the holiday season.  

While the Easter cactus (Rhipsalidopsis gaertneri) blooms in the springtime, usually around Easter, adding a burst of color to celebrate the arrival of spring.  

Another difference is in their leaf shape. Christmas cacti have flat, scalloped leaves, while Easter cacti have more rounded, claw-like leaves. Both cacti produce beautiful, colorful flowers and can be a festive addition to your home during the holiday season! 

Why is it called an Easter cactus? 

Easter cacti are called so because they typically bloom in Spring; during the Easter time. The name "Easter cactus" helps to distinguish it from other cacti that may have different blooming periods. It's a fun way to associate the plant with a specific holiday. 

What triggers the Easter cactus to bloom? 

The Easter cactus blooms in response to changes in light and temperature. As the days get shorter and the temperatures cool down, it signals the plant to produce buds and ,eventually flowers.  

So, the combination of shorter days and cooler temperatures triggers the Easter cactus to bloom. 

How long does Easter cactus live? 

The Easter cactus, also known as the Schlumbergera gaertneri, has an average lifespan of 10 to 20 years. However, with proper care and maintenance, some Easter cacti have been known to live and bloom for even up to 20 years. 

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Easter Cactus - Rhipsalidopsis gaertneri

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Please note: All Landscape Ready plants that are in a 6-inch pot or larger WILL NOT come with a pot as it will be shipped bare root.

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Please note: Our large plants are many years old, and as a result, they might have minor scaring but will arrive 100% healthy and looking great.

Please note: Our large plants are shipped bare root. They are also many years old, and as a result, they might have minor scaring but will arrive healthy and looking great.

If you live in a cold climate and are expecting temperatures below 40 degrees within the next five days after placing your order, we highly recommend adding a heat pack to your order. If you do not order a heat pack, we do not send one with your order.

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**FREE HEAT PACK WITH ORDERS OVER $50 before taxes and shipping- BY REQUEST ONLY, PLEASE MAKE A NOTE ON YOUR ORDER.

To prevent plants from freezing while in transit, orders placed for areas with extreme severe freezing temperatures will be held for shipment until it is safe to ship.

Plants that are in 3.5" pots and smaller will be shipped in its pot to prevent any damage to the roots. Any plant that is 6" and larger WILL NOT come with a pot as it will be shipped bare root.

Depending on the species and season, you will receive a very similar plant to the one in the picture. It may or may not be blooming at the time of your purchase.

We ship via USPS Priority Mail, and we calculate the shipping cost based on the weight and volume of your purchase. Care instructions are included in every package you order. Please allow us up to 3 business days to process your order. Depending on your location, we will ship the plants on a certain day to avoid transit time during weekends or holidays. If you wish to receive your order on a specific date, or have special instructions, please add a note on your order. If you have any questions or comments, please feel free to contact us at any time.

  • Description
  • Key Plant Features

If you want to add some color to your home or garden in the spring, the Easter cactus, also known as Rhipsalidopsis gaertneri, is a great choice, especially around the Easter holiday, when this tropical cactus is noted for its magnificent and prolific star-shaped blooms. Native to Brazil, it is also known as the spring cactus.

One of the distinguishing features of the Easter cactus is its flattened stem segments, which are often referred to as leaves. These segments are typically smooth and have serrated edges, giving the cactus a more delicate appearance compared to other holiday cacti like Thanksgiving cactus or Christmas cactus. The stem segments are also arranged in a cascading manner, creating an attractive hanging or trailing effect.

Furthermore, the Easter cactus is frequently confused with the Easter lily cacti (Echinopsis oxygona). While they both have the word "Easter" in their names, they are not related.

Easter Cactus Flowering – Blooming Tips

The flowers of the Easter cactus family offer a wide range of options. Along with its pink, white, and red Easter cactus varieties, it has another eye-catching variety known as the orange Easter cactus, which has beautiful orange flowers. The flowers are usually tubular in shape and have multiple layers of petals, creating a beautiful and intricate display. The blooms typically last for several weeks, almost throughout March and April, adding a burst of color and beauty to any space.

The Easter cactus blooms in response to changes in light and temperature. As the days get shorter and the temperatures cool down, it signals the plant to produce buds and, eventually flowers. So, the combination of shorter days and cooler temperatures triggers the Easter cactus to bloom.

To ensure optimal blooming, stop fertilizing two months before the spring blooming period. Keep the cactus cool at 50 degrees Fahrenheit at night and warm during the day, but avoid placing it in direct sunlight or near a heater.

After the blooming period, prepare for next year's flowering by cutting back on watering until mid-winter, which will initiate the dark and light process again, promoting prolific blooming in early spring.

Watering Needs

When it comes to watering the Easter cactus, it's important to find the right balance. It needs a bit more watering as compared to other regular cacti and prefers to be kept evenly moist during its active growing season, which is usually in the spring and summer. So, you'll want to make sure the soil is moist but not soaking wet. Give it a good watering, allowing the water to drain out completely, and then let the top 2 inches or so of the soil dry out before watering again. Remember, overwatering can be a big no-no for the Rhipsalidopsis gaertneri Easter cactus, as it can lead to root rot.

During its dormant period in the late fall and early winter, the Easter cactus doesn't need as much water. It's best to let the potting soil dry out slightly between waterings. You can reduce the frequency of watering during this time but still keep an eye on the moisture level. It's always a good idea to check the soil with your finger to see if it's dry before giving it a drink. Don't forget that proper drainage is important, so make sure your clay pots have drainage holes to prevent water from sitting in the bottom.

Light Requirement

When it comes to light requirements, the Easter cactus are great houseplants, as they can handle a wide variety of bright, indirect light. The Easter cactus grows naturally in areas that are partially shaded from the sun because it is an understory holiday plant in its native forests. Rhipsalidopsis gaertneri thrives in a spot where it receives bright, filtered sunlight for a few hours a day. Avoid placing it in direct sunlight, as this can scorch the leaves. A great spot for your Easter cactus could be near a window with a sheer curtain or in a well-lit room with plenty of natural, bright light.

If you notice that your Brazilian forest cactus—Easter cactus—isn't blooming as much or that its growth seems stunted, it might be an indication that it needs more light. On the other hand, if the leaves start to turn yellow or pale, it could be a sign that it's getting too much direct sunlight. Remember, finding the right balance of light is key to keeping your Easter cactus happy and healthy!

Optimal Soil & Fertilizer Needs

Native to Brazil's rainforests, Rhipsalidopsis gaertneri Easter cacti are epiphytic cacti. In its natural environment, an Easter cactus is an epiphyte, meaning that it grows on rocks, trees, and other plants rather than in soil. Although Easter cacti are usually planted in soil as houseplants, they need loose potting mixes that give their roots enough air to breathe. They cannot thrive in dense, compacted soil. Instead, make or buy a soil-nutrient-rich, well-draining potting mix, or ideally, use our specialized cactus potting mix that contains 5 natural substrates and mycorrhizae to promote the development of a strong root system that helps your Rhipsalidopsis cactus thrive.

As for fertilizer, the Easter cactus benefits from a balanced (5-10-5) NPK, water-soluble fertilizer formulated for cacti. During the active growing season in spring, you can fertilize your Easter cactus about once a year. However, during its dormant period in late fall and winter, it's best to hold off on fertilizing as Rhipsalidopsis gaertneri is not actively growing.

Remember, it's important not to over-fertilize your Easter cactus, as this can cause fertilizer to burn and damage the roots. Always err on the side of caution and follow the recommended dosage. With the right soil and proper fertilization, your holiday plants will thrive and reward you with beautiful blooms!

General Tips for Growing an Easter Cactus

  1. Find a bright spot but avoid direct sunlight.
  2. Water it when the top 2 inches of soil feels dry.
  3. Keep the temperature between 60 to 70 degrees Fahrenheit.
  4. The Easter cactus blooms because of changes in light and temperature, signaling the plant to produce buds and flowers.
  5. To ensure optimal blooming, stop fertilizing two months before spring and keep the cactus cool and warm.
  6. Fertilize once a year during the growing season.
  7. Prune after blooming to encourage bushier growth.

Hardiness Zone & More

The Easter cactus is a versatile plant that can thrive both indoors and outdoors. When grown indoors, it prefers a moderate temperature range of 60 to 70 degrees Fahrenheit. However, if you decide to grow it outdoors, it is important to consider the USDA hardiness zone. The Easter cactus is typically suitable for USDA zones 10 to 11, which include regions with mild winters and warm climates. Unlike desert cacti, they prefer temperatures between 60 and 75°F during the day and slightly cooler temperatures at night. It's important to avoid exposing the Easter cactus to temperatures below 50°F, as this can cause damage to the Easter plant Rhipsalidopsis gaertneri.

When it comes to humidity, the Easter cactus enjoys moderate humidity levels. It can tolerate average indoor humidity, but it's best to avoid placing it in areas with high humidity, such as near a bathroom or kitchen. If you live in a particularly dry climate, you can increase the humidity around your Easter cactus by placing a tray filled with water and pebbles near the plant or using a humidifier.

Propagating Easter Cactus

For Easter cacti, you can take stem cuttings or seeds. Simply cut a healthy segment of the cactus stem and let it dry for a few days. Then, you can grow an Easter cactus by cutting it in well-draining soil and keeping it lightly moist. With time, roots will develop, and you'll have a new Easter cactus to enjoy or share with others!

Pruning Easter Cactus

To encourage busier growth, pruning is an important step in caring for Easter cacti. By trimming back the stems, you can help the plant develop a fuller and more compact shape. Start by identifying any long, leggy stems or branches that are growing outward. Using clean and sharp pruning shears, make clean cuts just above a segment joint or node. This will promote new growth from that point and encourage a bushier appearance. It's best to prune Easter cacti after they finish blooming, typically in spring or early summer. Remember to remove any dead or damaged stems as well to maintain the overall health of the plant.

Overall, the Easter cactus, Rhipsalidopsis gaertneri is a stunning plant that brings a touch of elegance and beauty to any home or garden. Its unique appearance, vibrant flowers, and relatively easy-care requirements make it a popular choice among cactus enthusiasts and plant lovers alike. Whether you're celebrating Easter or simply looking for a striking and low-maintenance plant, the Easter cactus is definitely worth considering. Order your very own Rhipsalidopsis gaertneri Easter cactus for sale today!

Bloom Season Spring
Botanical Name Rhipsalidopsis gaertneri
Common Name Easter cactus, spring cactus
Dormancy Winter
Family Cactaceae
Flower Color Pink
Genus Rhipsalidopsis
Growth Habit Hanging, Trailing
Growth Rate Slow
Hardiness Zone 10, 11, 12
Mature Size Up to 2 ft. tall, 2 ft. wide
Native Area Brazil
Plant Type Perennial cactus
Propagation By stem cuttings, seeds
Resistance Drought tolerant, pest resistance, mild frost tolerant
Soil PH 6.5, Acidic, Neutral
Soil Type specialized cactus potting mix
Special Features Showy flowers
Sun Exposure Full sun, partial shade
Toxicity Safe for humans, mildly toxic for dogs and cats
Watering Needs Low

Pests & Common Problems of Easter Cactus

Easter cacti are generally hardy plants, but they can still fall victim to a few common pests and problems. Here are some common pests and problems that these epiphytic cacti may encounter: 

Mealybugs: These little white insects can harm a plant by becoming infested. To get rid of them, use rubbing alcohol or insecticidal soap.

Root rot: Root rot can result from either overwatering or poorly draining soil. Make sure the soil drains properly, and don't water it too much.

Fungal diseases: Excessive moisture can also result in fungal diseases like powdery mildew. Maintain good air circulation and avoid getting water on the leaves.

Lack of blooms: If an Easter cactus isn't blooming, it may be due to insufficient light or improper temperature. Ensure it gets enough bright, indirect light and cool temperatures during the bud formation and bloom period. 

Leaf drop: Your easter cactus can drop leaves for a variety of reasons, including overwatering, underwatering, or exposure to extreme temperatures. If you notice your plant dropping leaves, it's important to identify the underlying cause and take steps to correct it. 

Yellowing leaves: You might need to repot your easter cactus plant. If the easter cactus leaves become yellow, it could be a sign that the soil is not draining adequately. After checking for root rot, repot. 

FAQs - Easter Cactus Plant

What is the difference between an Easter and Christmas cactus? 

Easter cacti and Christmas cacti are both types of holiday cacti that differ in their flowering time. The Christmas cactus (Schlumbergera bridgesii), as its name suggests, typically blooms in late fall or early winter, which is perfect for adding festive cheer to the holiday season.  

While the Easter cactus (Rhipsalidopsis gaertneri) blooms in the springtime, usually around Easter, adding a burst of color to celebrate the arrival of spring.  

Another difference is in their leaf shape. Christmas cacti have flat, scalloped leaves, while Easter cacti have more rounded, claw-like leaves. Both cacti produce beautiful, colorful flowers and can be a festive addition to your home during the holiday season! 

Why is it called an Easter cactus? 

Easter cacti are called so because they typically bloom in Spring; during the Easter time. The name "Easter cactus" helps to distinguish it from other cacti that may have different blooming periods. It's a fun way to associate the plant with a specific holiday. 

What triggers the Easter cactus to bloom? 

The Easter cactus blooms in response to changes in light and temperature. As the days get shorter and the temperatures cool down, it signals the plant to produce buds and ,eventually flowers.  

So, the combination of shorter days and cooler temperatures triggers the Easter cactus to bloom. 

How long does Easter cactus live? 

The Easter cactus, also known as the Schlumbergera gaertneri, has an average lifespan of 10 to 20 years. However, with proper care and maintenance, some Easter cacti have been known to live and bloom for even up to 20 years. 

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