Elephant’s Foot Succulent - Dioscorea elephantipes
Elephant’s Foot Succulent - Dioscorea elephantipes
Elephant’s Foot Succulent - Dioscorea elephantipes
Elephant’s Foot Succulent - Dioscorea elephantipes
Elephant’s Foot Succulent - Dioscorea elephantipes
Elephant’s Foot Succulent - Dioscorea elephantipes
Elephant’s Foot Succulent - Dioscorea elephantipes
Elephant’s Foot Succulent - Dioscorea elephantipes
Elephant’s Foot Succulent - Dioscorea elephantipes
Elephant’s Foot Succulent - Dioscorea elephantipes
Elephant’s Foot Succulent - Dioscorea elephantipes
Elephant’s Foot Succulent - Dioscorea elephantipes

Introducing the stunning elephant's foot succulent, also known as Dioscorea elephantipes a succulent plant that belongs to the Dioscoreaceae family. It earned its common name, elephant’s foot plant, because of its tuberous caudex, which resembles an elephant's foot during its growth period. The caudex is the swollen underground stem that stores water and nutrients for your Elephant's foot succulent. 

The Dioscorea elephantipes have several other common names, such as Hottentot bread, Tortoise back plant, and Turtle back plant. Native to the arid regions of South Africa and Namibia, this beautiful plant has thick, fleshy stems and heart-shaped leaves covered in a waxy cuticle, which helps reduce water loss and protect it from extreme temperatures. 

The Elephant Foot plant is a slow-growing species that can grow up to 10 feet tall and 3 feet wide. Over time it develops a thick caudex that resembles an elephant's foot or small tree trunk and has a rough and textured surface. 

As the Dioscorea elephantipes elephant’s foot plant matures, it produces tendrils that can climb and attach to nearby structures for support. The Dioscorea elephantipes is summer-deciduous, dropping its leaves during the summer, with stems typically dying back and new shoots emerging in winter. 

The flowers of Dioscorea elephantipes are greenish-yellow and bloom in late fall and early winter. This elephant foot plant is dioecious, with male and female flowers in separate plants. The pale greenish-yellow flowers appear in winter, with male flowers in erect racemes and female flowers in spinescent spikes. They grow on long, slender stalks that emerge from the Dioscorea elephantipes caudex, adding a touch of charm to this already fascinating plant. 

Additionally, the elephant’s foot is considered mildly toxic to humans and pets if consumed. The elephant foot plant contains substances called saponins, which can cause gastrointestinal discomfort, nausea, and vomiting if consumed. It's always best to keep your elephant's foot succulent out of the reach of curious children and pets to ensure their safety. 

With its unique appearance and adaptability, the Elephant Foot succulent is a captivating addition to any succulent collection. Its distinctive caudex and climbing tendrils make it a real eye-catcher. Just be sure to provide it with the right conditions and care, and you'll have a stunning plant to admire for years to come! 

Watering Needs 

When it comes to watering this unique Elephant's foot succulent, it's important to strike the right balance. Dioscorea elephantipes is adapted to arid conditions, so it prefers infrequent but thorough waterings. Overwatering can cause root rot and other problems, so it's critical to let the soil dry between waterings. 

During the growing season, which is typically winter and spring, you can water your Elephant Foot plant when the top inch of soil feels dry to the touch. When you do water, make sure to provide a deep soak, allowing the water to penetrate the soil and reach the roots. Allow the excess water to drain completely. 

In the dormant season, which is usually in late summer, you'll want to reduce watering significantly. The succulent Elephant's foot goes through a period of rest, and its water requirements decrease. During this time, you can water separate plants sparingly, only when the soil has completely dried out. 

Remember, it's always better to underwater than overwater to your Dioscorea elephantipes. This succulent plant is adapted to survive in dry conditions and can tolerate short periods of drought. By following these watering guidelines, you'll help ensure the health and longevity of your Elephant Foot plant. 

Light Requirements 

When it comes to indoor lighting, the Elephant Foot succulent does best in bright, indirect light. It thrives in a spot near a window where it can receive plenty of bright, filtered sunlight. Avoid placing it in direct sunlight, as this can cause the leaves to scorch. 

If you're growing Dioscorea elephantipes outdoors, it prefers a sunny location with partial shade to full sun for at least 4-6 hours a day. It can handle direct sunlight, but it's important to acclimate your elephant foot plant gradually to prevent sunburn. Start by placing it in a partially shaded area and gradually increase the exposure to sunlight over time. 

Keep in mind that the light requirements may vary depending on your specific climate and the intensity of sunlight in your region. Observing your Dioscorea elephantipe's response to light is key. If the leaves start to turn yellow or develop brown spots, it may be an indication that it's receiving too much direct light. On the other hand, if the leaves become elongated and pale, it may be a sign of insufficient light. 

Remember to rotate your Elephant Foot succulent occasionally to ensure even growth and prevent it from leaning toward the light source. 

Optimal Soil & Fertilizer Needs   

The elephant's foot plant likes very airy, porous, nutrient-rich soil with a pH of 5.6- 6.5. Cacti require fast-draining soil that dries completely between waterings. Your soil must have a sandy texture and a low water-holding capacity, just like desert soil. Soggy, wet soil can damage your cactus and contribute to bacterial and fungal rot. In addition, because of a lack of oxygen, soggy soil substitutes air pockets with water, resulting in an anaerobic environment that can kill your plant. 

As an alternative, you can create your own potting mix by combining equal portions of perlite, coarse sand, and good natural potting soil. Ideally, you want to use our specialized succulent potting mix that contains 5 natural substrates and organic mycorrhizae to promote the development of a strong root system that helps your Elephant's foot succulent to thrive. 

For fertilizer, Dioscorea elephantipes don't require frequent feeding. During the growing season, you can use a balanced (5-10-5), water-soluble fertilizer diluted to half the recommended strength. Apply the fertilizer once a year to provide the necessary nutrients. However, it's important not to over-fertilize, as this can cause excessive growth and weak stems. 

During the dormant season, you can reduce or completely stop fertilizing. The elephant foot succulent goes through a period of rest, and its nutrient requirements decrease. Remember, it's always better to err on the side of caution and under-fertilize rather than over-fertilize. This will help maintain the succulent natural growth habits and prevent any potential issues. 

Hardiness Zone & More 

When it comes to indoor temperature, the Elephant Foot plant prefers a warm environment. Ideally, keep the temperature between 65°F and 75°F during the day and slightly cooler at night. It's important to avoid exposing the plant to extreme temperature fluctuations, as it can be sensitive to sudden changes. Make sure to keep it away from drafts and cold windows to prevent any damage. 

If you are growing your Dioscorea elephantipes outdoors, it thrives in USDA zones 9 to 11. These zones generally have mild to warm climates with winter temperatures that rarely drop below freezing. If you live in a colder region, it's best to grow this plant as a container specimen that can be brought indoors during the colder months. 

In terms of humidity, Dioscorea elephantipes elephant foot succulent can tolerate a range of humidity levels. It can adapt to average indoor humidity, but it appreciates slightly higher humidity levels. If the air in your home is dry, you can increase humidity by placing a tray of water near the succulent plant or using a humidifier. 

Remember, in extremely cold temperatures, it's important to protect your Elephant Foot plant. If you're growing it outdoors, consider covering it with a frost cloth or moving it to a sheltered location during freezing weather. 

Propagating Elephant's Foot Plant 

One common method of propagation for this elephant foot plant is through Dioscorea elephantipes elephants foot succulent by seeds. You can collect the seeds from the seed capsule of the mature fruits of the plant and sow them in a well-draining potting mix in flat seed pans. Keep the soil consistently moist but not waterlogged, and place the sowing medium in a warm location with indirect sunlight. With patience, the seeds should germinate and grow into new plants. 

Another method is through stem cuttings. Pick a robust stem and carefully cut the stem right below a node. Give the wound several days to callus and dry. After that, plant the cutting, keeping the remaining portion of it exposed and putting the node in a container with well-draining soil. Give the soil some light moisture and indirect sunlight. With time, the cutting should develop roots and establish itself as a new growth. 

Remember, propagation can take time and patience, so don't be discouraged if it doesn't happen overnight. Keep an eye on the moisture levels, provide the right amount of light, and soon you'll have new Dioscorea elephantipes plants to enjoy! 

The Bottom Line 

Overall, the Dioscorea elephantipes (Elephant Foot plant) is a unique and exotic succulent plant with bulbous caudex and vining stems. It thrives in USDA hardiness zones 9 to 11, with a mild to warm climate. To care for it, maintain a warm indoor temperature between 65°F and 75°F, slightly cooler at night. Outdoors, it thrives in USDA hardiness zones 9 to 11, with slightly higher humidity levels.

To protect the plant from extremely cold temperatures, cover it with a frost cloth or move it to a sheltered location. By providing the right Dioscorea elephantipes care with adequate temperature, humidity, and protection, you can ensure the plant's well-being and longevity. 

Bloom Season Late Fall, Early Winter
Botanical Name Dioscorea elephantipes
Common Name Elephant's foot succulent, elephants foot plant, Hottentot bread, Tortoise back plant, Turtle back plant
Dormancy Summer
Family Dioscoreaceae
Flower Color Greenish, Yellow
Genus Dioscorea
Growth Habit Caudex
Growth Rate Fast
Hardiness Zone 9, 10, 11
Mature Size 3 ft. tall, 10 ft. wide
Native Area South africa
Plant Type Succulent
Propagation By seeds, stem cuttings
Resistance Drought tolerant, pest resistant, heat tolerant
Soil PH 6.5, Acidic, Neutral
Soil Type specialized succulent potting mix
Special Features Easy to maintain
Sun Exposure Full sun, partial shade
Toxicity Mildlt toxic to humans, Mildly toxic for pets
Watering Needs Low

Pests & Common Problems of Elephant's Foot Plant

The Elephant's Foot Plant Dioscorea elephantipes is generally a hardy and low-maintenance plant, but it can still face a few common problems and pests. The most common are: 

Mealybugs: These tiny white insects can infest your elephant foot plant, especially in warm and humid conditions. They appear as white, cotton-like clusters on the leaves and stems. To treat them, you can wipe them off with a cotton swab dipped in rubbing alcohol or use an organic insecticidal soap. 

Spider mites: These tiny pests can create fine webbing on the Dioscorea plant and cause yellowing or speckling of the leaves. You can wash them off with a strong stream of water or use an insecticidal soap specifically formulated for spider mites. 

Root rot: Overwatering or poor drainage can lead to root rot, which can cause the elephant's root succulent roots to become dry interior, mushy, and discolored. To prevent this, ensure that the plant is not sitting in water and that the soil has proper drainage. 

Sunburn: Dioscorea elephantipes prefers bright, indirect light, but direct sunlight can cause sunburn on its leaves, resulting in brown or yellow patches. If you notice sunburn, move the plant to a slightly shadier location. 

Remember, prevention is key in dealing with pests and common problems. Regularly inspect your plant, maintain proper watering practices, and provide the right growing conditions to keep your Dioscorea elephantipes healthy and happy! 

FAQs of Elephant's Foot Plant

How do you take care of an elephant's foot plant? 

To care for an Elephant Foot plant (Dioscorea elephantipes), you'll want to provide it with bright, indirect light, as it can tolerate some shade but still needs adequate light. Water your elephant's foot succulent thoroughly, but allow the soil to dry out slightly between waterings to prevent overwatering and root rot. It's also important to ensure proper drainage to avoid waterlogged conditions.  

As for temperature, it prefers warm temperatures between 65-85°F during the day and slightly cooler temperatures at night. When it comes to humidity, the Elephant Foot plant can tolerate average indoor humidity levels, but it appreciates a bit of extra humidity.  

Additionally, be cautious of extreme cold temperatures as the elephant foot plant is not frost-tolerant. If you're growing it outdoors, it prefers USDA zones 9-11 temperatures.

Is elephant foot a succulent? 

Yes, the elephant foot (Dioscorea elephantipes) is indeed classified as a succulent. Its unique swollen stem, resembling an elephant's foot, allows it to store water and survive in arid conditions. Additionally, this elephant foot succulent is native to South Africa and is a popular choice among plant enthusiasts for its distinctive appearance. 

How long do Dioscorea elephantipes live? 

The lifespan of Dioscorea elephantipes, or the Elephant Foot plant, can vary depending on various factors such as care, environment, and growing conditions. In general, these elephant foot plants have been known to live for several decades, with some reaching up to 70 years or more!  

With proper care and attention, your Elephant Foot plant can be a long-lasting and cherished addition to your plant family. 

Is Dioscorea elephantipes poisonous? 

It's important to note that Dioscorea elephantipes (Elephant Foot plant) is considered toxic to humans and pets if consumed. It contains substances called saponins, which can cause gastrointestinal discomfort, nausea, and vomiting if consumed.  

It's always best to keep this plant out of reach of curious children and pets to ensure their safety. 

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Elephant’s Foot Succulent - Dioscorea elephantipes

sku: 726

73 reviews
Regular price$ 42.79
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Please note: All Landscape Ready plants that are in a 6-inch pot or larger WILL NOT come with a pot as it will be shipped bare root.

  • In stock, ready to ship
  • Inventory on the way

Please note: Our large plants are many years old, and as a result, they might have minor scaring but will arrive 100% healthy and looking great.

Please note: Our large plants are shipped bare root. They are also many years old, and as a result, they might have minor scaring but will arrive healthy and looking great.

If you live in a cold climate and are expecting temperatures below 40 degrees within the next five days after placing your order, we highly recommend adding a heat pack to your order. If you do not order a heat pack, we do not send one with your order.

BUY HEAT PACKS HERE

**FREE HEAT PACK WITH ORDERS OVER $50 before taxes and shipping- BY REQUEST ONLY, PLEASE MAKE A NOTE ON YOUR ORDER.

To prevent plants from freezing while in transit, orders placed for areas with extreme severe freezing temperatures will be held for shipment until it is safe to ship.

Plants that are in 3.5" pots and smaller will be shipped in its pot to prevent any damage to the roots. Any plant that is 6" and larger WILL NOT come with a pot as it will be shipped bare root.

Depending on the species and season, you will receive a very similar plant to the one in the picture. It may or may not be blooming at the time of your purchase.

We ship via USPS Priority Mail, and we calculate the shipping cost based on the weight and volume of your purchase. Care instructions are included in every package you order. Please allow us up to 3 business days to process your order. Depending on your location, we will ship the plants on a certain day to avoid transit time during weekends or holidays. If you wish to receive your order on a specific date, or have special instructions, please add a note on your order. If you have any questions or comments, please feel free to contact us at any time.

  • Description
  • Key Plant Features

Introducing the stunning elephant's foot succulent, also known as Dioscorea elephantipes a succulent plant that belongs to the Dioscoreaceae family. It earned its common name, elephant’s foot plant, because of its tuberous caudex, which resembles an elephant's foot during its growth period. The caudex is the swollen underground stem that stores water and nutrients for your Elephant's foot succulent. 

The Dioscorea elephantipes have several other common names, such as Hottentot bread, Tortoise back plant, and Turtle back plant. Native to the arid regions of South Africa and Namibia, this beautiful plant has thick, fleshy stems and heart-shaped leaves covered in a waxy cuticle, which helps reduce water loss and protect it from extreme temperatures. 

The Elephant Foot plant is a slow-growing species that can grow up to 10 feet tall and 3 feet wide. Over time it develops a thick caudex that resembles an elephant's foot or small tree trunk and has a rough and textured surface. 

As the Dioscorea elephantipes elephant’s foot plant matures, it produces tendrils that can climb and attach to nearby structures for support. The Dioscorea elephantipes is summer-deciduous, dropping its leaves during the summer, with stems typically dying back and new shoots emerging in winter. 

The flowers of Dioscorea elephantipes are greenish-yellow and bloom in late fall and early winter. This elephant foot plant is dioecious, with male and female flowers in separate plants. The pale greenish-yellow flowers appear in winter, with male flowers in erect racemes and female flowers in spinescent spikes. They grow on long, slender stalks that emerge from the Dioscorea elephantipes caudex, adding a touch of charm to this already fascinating plant. 

Additionally, the elephant’s foot is considered mildly toxic to humans and pets if consumed. The elephant foot plant contains substances called saponins, which can cause gastrointestinal discomfort, nausea, and vomiting if consumed. It's always best to keep your elephant's foot succulent out of the reach of curious children and pets to ensure their safety. 

With its unique appearance and adaptability, the Elephant Foot succulent is a captivating addition to any succulent collection. Its distinctive caudex and climbing tendrils make it a real eye-catcher. Just be sure to provide it with the right conditions and care, and you'll have a stunning plant to admire for years to come! 

Watering Needs 

When it comes to watering this unique Elephant's foot succulent, it's important to strike the right balance. Dioscorea elephantipes is adapted to arid conditions, so it prefers infrequent but thorough waterings. Overwatering can cause root rot and other problems, so it's critical to let the soil dry between waterings. 

During the growing season, which is typically winter and spring, you can water your Elephant Foot plant when the top inch of soil feels dry to the touch. When you do water, make sure to provide a deep soak, allowing the water to penetrate the soil and reach the roots. Allow the excess water to drain completely. 

In the dormant season, which is usually in late summer, you'll want to reduce watering significantly. The succulent Elephant's foot goes through a period of rest, and its water requirements decrease. During this time, you can water separate plants sparingly, only when the soil has completely dried out. 

Remember, it's always better to underwater than overwater to your Dioscorea elephantipes. This succulent plant is adapted to survive in dry conditions and can tolerate short periods of drought. By following these watering guidelines, you'll help ensure the health and longevity of your Elephant Foot plant. 

Light Requirements 

When it comes to indoor lighting, the Elephant Foot succulent does best in bright, indirect light. It thrives in a spot near a window where it can receive plenty of bright, filtered sunlight. Avoid placing it in direct sunlight, as this can cause the leaves to scorch. 

If you're growing Dioscorea elephantipes outdoors, it prefers a sunny location with partial shade to full sun for at least 4-6 hours a day. It can handle direct sunlight, but it's important to acclimate your elephant foot plant gradually to prevent sunburn. Start by placing it in a partially shaded area and gradually increase the exposure to sunlight over time. 

Keep in mind that the light requirements may vary depending on your specific climate and the intensity of sunlight in your region. Observing your Dioscorea elephantipe's response to light is key. If the leaves start to turn yellow or develop brown spots, it may be an indication that it's receiving too much direct light. On the other hand, if the leaves become elongated and pale, it may be a sign of insufficient light. 

Remember to rotate your Elephant Foot succulent occasionally to ensure even growth and prevent it from leaning toward the light source. 

Optimal Soil & Fertilizer Needs   

The elephant's foot plant likes very airy, porous, nutrient-rich soil with a pH of 5.6- 6.5. Cacti require fast-draining soil that dries completely between waterings. Your soil must have a sandy texture and a low water-holding capacity, just like desert soil. Soggy, wet soil can damage your cactus and contribute to bacterial and fungal rot. In addition, because of a lack of oxygen, soggy soil substitutes air pockets with water, resulting in an anaerobic environment that can kill your plant. 

As an alternative, you can create your own potting mix by combining equal portions of perlite, coarse sand, and good natural potting soil. Ideally, you want to use our specialized succulent potting mix that contains 5 natural substrates and organic mycorrhizae to promote the development of a strong root system that helps your Elephant's foot succulent to thrive. 

For fertilizer, Dioscorea elephantipes don't require frequent feeding. During the growing season, you can use a balanced (5-10-5), water-soluble fertilizer diluted to half the recommended strength. Apply the fertilizer once a year to provide the necessary nutrients. However, it's important not to over-fertilize, as this can cause excessive growth and weak stems. 

During the dormant season, you can reduce or completely stop fertilizing. The elephant foot succulent goes through a period of rest, and its nutrient requirements decrease. Remember, it's always better to err on the side of caution and under-fertilize rather than over-fertilize. This will help maintain the succulent natural growth habits and prevent any potential issues. 

Hardiness Zone & More 

When it comes to indoor temperature, the Elephant Foot plant prefers a warm environment. Ideally, keep the temperature between 65°F and 75°F during the day and slightly cooler at night. It's important to avoid exposing the plant to extreme temperature fluctuations, as it can be sensitive to sudden changes. Make sure to keep it away from drafts and cold windows to prevent any damage. 

If you are growing your Dioscorea elephantipes outdoors, it thrives in USDA zones 9 to 11. These zones generally have mild to warm climates with winter temperatures that rarely drop below freezing. If you live in a colder region, it's best to grow this plant as a container specimen that can be brought indoors during the colder months. 

In terms of humidity, Dioscorea elephantipes elephant foot succulent can tolerate a range of humidity levels. It can adapt to average indoor humidity, but it appreciates slightly higher humidity levels. If the air in your home is dry, you can increase humidity by placing a tray of water near the succulent plant or using a humidifier. 

Remember, in extremely cold temperatures, it's important to protect your Elephant Foot plant. If you're growing it outdoors, consider covering it with a frost cloth or moving it to a sheltered location during freezing weather. 

Propagating Elephant's Foot Plant 

One common method of propagation for this elephant foot plant is through Dioscorea elephantipes elephants foot succulent by seeds. You can collect the seeds from the seed capsule of the mature fruits of the plant and sow them in a well-draining potting mix in flat seed pans. Keep the soil consistently moist but not waterlogged, and place the sowing medium in a warm location with indirect sunlight. With patience, the seeds should germinate and grow into new plants. 

Another method is through stem cuttings. Pick a robust stem and carefully cut the stem right below a node. Give the wound several days to callus and dry. After that, plant the cutting, keeping the remaining portion of it exposed and putting the node in a container with well-draining soil. Give the soil some light moisture and indirect sunlight. With time, the cutting should develop roots and establish itself as a new growth. 

Remember, propagation can take time and patience, so don't be discouraged if it doesn't happen overnight. Keep an eye on the moisture levels, provide the right amount of light, and soon you'll have new Dioscorea elephantipes plants to enjoy! 

The Bottom Line 

Overall, the Dioscorea elephantipes (Elephant Foot plant) is a unique and exotic succulent plant with bulbous caudex and vining stems. It thrives in USDA hardiness zones 9 to 11, with a mild to warm climate. To care for it, maintain a warm indoor temperature between 65°F and 75°F, slightly cooler at night. Outdoors, it thrives in USDA hardiness zones 9 to 11, with slightly higher humidity levels.

To protect the plant from extremely cold temperatures, cover it with a frost cloth or move it to a sheltered location. By providing the right Dioscorea elephantipes care with adequate temperature, humidity, and protection, you can ensure the plant's well-being and longevity. 

Bloom Season Late Fall, Early Winter
Botanical Name Dioscorea elephantipes
Common Name Elephant's foot succulent, elephants foot plant, Hottentot bread, Tortoise back plant, Turtle back plant
Dormancy Summer
Family Dioscoreaceae
Flower Color Greenish, Yellow
Genus Dioscorea
Growth Habit Caudex
Growth Rate Fast
Hardiness Zone 9, 10, 11
Mature Size 3 ft. tall, 10 ft. wide
Native Area South africa
Plant Type Succulent
Propagation By seeds, stem cuttings
Resistance Drought tolerant, pest resistant, heat tolerant
Soil PH 6.5, Acidic, Neutral
Soil Type specialized succulent potting mix
Special Features Easy to maintain
Sun Exposure Full sun, partial shade
Toxicity Mildlt toxic to humans, Mildly toxic for pets
Watering Needs Low

Pests & Common Problems of Elephant's Foot Plant

The Elephant's Foot Plant Dioscorea elephantipes is generally a hardy and low-maintenance plant, but it can still face a few common problems and pests. The most common are: 

Mealybugs: These tiny white insects can infest your elephant foot plant, especially in warm and humid conditions. They appear as white, cotton-like clusters on the leaves and stems. To treat them, you can wipe them off with a cotton swab dipped in rubbing alcohol or use an organic insecticidal soap. 

Spider mites: These tiny pests can create fine webbing on the Dioscorea plant and cause yellowing or speckling of the leaves. You can wash them off with a strong stream of water or use an insecticidal soap specifically formulated for spider mites. 

Root rot: Overwatering or poor drainage can lead to root rot, which can cause the elephant's root succulent roots to become dry interior, mushy, and discolored. To prevent this, ensure that the plant is not sitting in water and that the soil has proper drainage. 

Sunburn: Dioscorea elephantipes prefers bright, indirect light, but direct sunlight can cause sunburn on its leaves, resulting in brown or yellow patches. If you notice sunburn, move the plant to a slightly shadier location. 

Remember, prevention is key in dealing with pests and common problems. Regularly inspect your plant, maintain proper watering practices, and provide the right growing conditions to keep your Dioscorea elephantipes healthy and happy! 

FAQs of Elephant's Foot Plant

How do you take care of an elephant's foot plant? 

To care for an Elephant Foot plant (Dioscorea elephantipes), you'll want to provide it with bright, indirect light, as it can tolerate some shade but still needs adequate light. Water your elephant's foot succulent thoroughly, but allow the soil to dry out slightly between waterings to prevent overwatering and root rot. It's also important to ensure proper drainage to avoid waterlogged conditions.  

As for temperature, it prefers warm temperatures between 65-85°F during the day and slightly cooler temperatures at night. When it comes to humidity, the Elephant Foot plant can tolerate average indoor humidity levels, but it appreciates a bit of extra humidity.  

Additionally, be cautious of extreme cold temperatures as the elephant foot plant is not frost-tolerant. If you're growing it outdoors, it prefers USDA zones 9-11 temperatures.

Is elephant foot a succulent? 

Yes, the elephant foot (Dioscorea elephantipes) is indeed classified as a succulent. Its unique swollen stem, resembling an elephant's foot, allows it to store water and survive in arid conditions. Additionally, this elephant foot succulent is native to South Africa and is a popular choice among plant enthusiasts for its distinctive appearance. 

How long do Dioscorea elephantipes live? 

The lifespan of Dioscorea elephantipes, or the Elephant Foot plant, can vary depending on various factors such as care, environment, and growing conditions. In general, these elephant foot plants have been known to live for several decades, with some reaching up to 70 years or more!  

With proper care and attention, your Elephant Foot plant can be a long-lasting and cherished addition to your plant family. 

Is Dioscorea elephantipes poisonous? 

It's important to note that Dioscorea elephantipes (Elephant Foot plant) is considered toxic to humans and pets if consumed. It contains substances called saponins, which can cause gastrointestinal discomfort, nausea, and vomiting if consumed.  

It's always best to keep this plant out of reach of curious children and pets to ensure their safety. 

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