Medusa Head &
Medusa Head &
Medusa Head &
Medusa Head &
Medusa Head &
Medusa Head &
Medusa Head &
Medusa Head &
Medusa Head &
Medusa Head &
Medusa Head &
Medusa Head &
Medusa Head &
Medusa Head &
Medusa Head &
Medusa Head &
Medusa Head &
Medusa Head &
Medusa Head &

Looking for a plant that's as unique as you are? Look no further than the Medusa Head, also known as 'Euphorbia flanaganii', a beautiful member of Euphorbia genus!

In ancient Greek mythology, Medusa became a Gorgon, a female monster with snakes for hair and a gaze that could turn people into stone.  The plant's unique appearance, with its twisting, snake-like stems and tufts of green leaves at the top, is said to resemble the head of Medusa, who was known for her hair made of snakes. The name "Medusa head" is a reference to this mythological connection. And let's talk about those snake-like branches - they can spread up to 16 inches in diameter, giving this stunning medusa head succulent an almost pan-like shape.   

In the summer, clusters of yellow cyathium appear in the center of the plant at the tip of the stem; it's like having a tiny sun in your own home. This is definitely its most beautiful feature. Just wait until late winter or early spring, when tiny, brilliant yellow flowers cover this Euphorbia from head to toe.  It's truly a spectacle! 

With time, new pups will appear at the tips of its tendrils and form their own caudices - it's a never-ending cycle of bizarre beauty! This weird and wild succulent will continue to amaze as it grows into an even larger Medusa-like creation. This medusa head is exceptionally easy to propagate by divisions and cuttings so you can quickly grow your collection with just a few simple steps. So why wait? 

Give your plant collection some serious edge with 'Euphorbia flanaganii'. 

Watering Needs 

The Medusa head Euphorbia is a succulent that definitely stands out from the crowd! Unlike its desert-dwelling counterparts, this little guy doesn't do well with extended periods of drought. If you're lucky enough to be the proud owner of one of these unique plants, make sure to water it weekly during those hot summer months.  

When the soil is dry several inches below the surface, don't hesitate to give it a good soak. And get this - when your Medusa Head is feeling parched and in need of some hydration, it'll actually start curling its arms towards the center as if to say, "I'm thirsty!" So cute and clever!  

Just make sure not to overdo it and let them sit in standing water, or else they could develop root rot (yikes!). 

Light Requirements 

The medusa head is known for its hardiness, but it's best grown in bright, indirect sunlight and hot weather. To ensure the succulent thrives, provide 8-10 hours of bright but indirect light. Without enough light, photosynthesis rates drop, branches become thin, colors appear dull, there is an unhealthy look to the plant, and growth is stunted.  

Remember, learn to adjust your Medusa euphorbia to avoid burns if the location where you have the plant is exposed to direct sunlight. 

Optimal Soil & Fertilizer Needs 

The Euphorbia head medusa is like very airy, porous, nutrient-rich soil with a pH of 5.5 - 6.7, Succulents require fast-draining soil that dries completely between waterings. Your soil must have a sandy texture and a low water-holding capacity, just like desert soil.  Soggy wet soil can damage your flanaganii succulent and contributes to bacterial and fungal rot. In addition, because of a lack of oxygen, soggy soil substitutes air pockets with water, resulting in an anaerobic environment that can kill your plant. 

As an alternative, you can create your own potting mix by combining equal portions of perlite, coarse sand, and good natural potting soil. Ideally, you want to use our specialized potting mix that contains organic mycorrhizae to promote the development of a strong root system that helps your succulent to thrive.  

When it comes to fertilizing your medusas head plant, it only needs a small amount of fertilizer applied once a year in spring. Succulent prefers a fertilizer with lower doses of NPK, with a maximum ratio of 5-10-5 that is higher in phosphorus than nitrogen.

Hardiness Zones & More 

As desert dwellers, the Medusa head enjoys hot temperatures. They prefer constant temperatures above 70 degrees Fahrenheit and can tolerate triple digits in the summer, so don't worry if your succulent gets too hot.  

This Euphorbia, on the other hand, cannot handle frost, cold, or freezing temperatures, so make sure it doesn't get below 30 degrees F in its environment.  If grown outdoors, the medusa head grows best in USDA zone 9 - 11. 

Be sure to add Euphorbia flanaganii to your collection today and elevate the beauty of your home or garden with this stunning-looking plant. 

Bloom Season Spring
Botanical Name Euphorbia flanaganii
Common Name Medusa Head, Euphorbia caput medusae
Dormancy Winter
Family Euphorbiaceae
Flower Color Green, Yellow
Genus Euphorbia
Growth Habit Trailing, hanging
Growth Rate Fast
Hardiness Zone 9, 10, 11
Mature Size 8 in. tall, 16 in. wide
Native Area South Africa
Plant Type Succulent
Propagation By offsets
Resistance Drought tolerant, deer resistant, heat resistant
Soil PH 6.5, Acidic, Neutral
Soil Type Succulent potting mix soil,
Special Features Tendril like branches
Sun Exposure Full sun, partial shade
Toxicity Safe for humans, mildly toxic (Keep away from children)
Watering Needs Moderate

Pests & Common Problems of Medusa Head

Mealy bugs and spider mites commonly prey on these plants. The roots, needle-like leaves, and fruits of Europhobia flanaganii are depleted by mealybugs. As a result of their excretion of honeydew, the plant's surroundings begin to grow sooty mold.

The leaves turn yellow and start to dry out when the succulent is severely infested with these bugs. The shedding of leaves can be a sign of a severe infestation. 

You can get rid of mealybugs and spider mites by spraying the infested plant with a solution of liquid soap and water. Applying pesticides is another way to get rid of these pests. Use pesticides derived from plants like neem or pyrethrum.

Another method is to soak a piece of cotton wool in alcohol and dab it on the infested areas. Alternatively, you could use high-pressure water to physically flush the bugs out of the affected areas. Furthermore, too much water or poorly draining soil can develop root rot, so avoid overwatering these medusa's head. 

Medusa Head FAQs

Is Medusa's head poisonous? 

Medusa's head is toxic to humans and animals if ingested. It produces a milky sap that can cause skin irritation and eye damage if it comes into contact with the skin or eyes. It is important to handle this plant with care and keep it out of reach of children and pets. 

Is Medusa's head a cactus? 

Medusa's head is not a cactus but a succulent plant. While it may look similar to some cacti, it is actually a member of the Euphorbia family and is native to South Africa. Like cacti, it is adapted to arid environments and is able to store water in its thick stems. 

Does a Medusa plant flower? 

Yes, Medusa's head (Euphorbia flanaganii) can produce small bright yellow, insignificant flowers in the spring and summer. However, the plant is typically grown for its unique, sculptural form rather than its flowers. 

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy Policy and Terms of Service apply.

Medusa Head 'Euphorbia flanaganii'

sku: 468

20 reviews
Regular price$ 17.49
/

Free Shipping on all orders over $89*


Size
Height:
Diameter:
Height:
Diameter: 5"-7"
Height:
Diameter: 8"-10"

Please note: All Landscape Ready plants that are in a 6-inch pot or larger WILL NOT come with a pot as it will be shipped bare root.

  • In stock, ready to ship
  • Inventory on the way

Please note: Our large plants are many years old, and as a result, they might have minor scaring but will arrive 100% healthy and looking great.

Please note: Our large plants are shipped bare root. They are also many years old, and as a result, they might have minor scaring but will arrive healthy and looking great.

sku:
Detailed description of this plant is below...

If you live in a cold climate and are expecting temperatures below 40 degrees within the next five days after placing your order, we highly recommend adding a heat pack to your order. If you do not order a heat pack, we do not send one with your order.

BUY HEAT PACKS HERE

**FREE HEAT PACK WITH ORDERS OVER $50 before taxes and shipping- BY REQUEST ONLY, PLEASE MAKE A NOTE ON YOUR ORDER.

To prevent plants from freezing while in transit, orders placed for areas with extreme severe freezing temperatures will be held for shipment until it is safe to ship.

FREE SHIPPING ON ALL ORDERS OVER $89 in the
Continental US.

Plants that are in 3.5" pots and smaller will be shipped in its pot to prevent any damage to the roots.

Any plant that is 6" and larger WILL NOT come with a pot as it will be shipped bare root.

Depending on the species and season, you will receive a very similar plant to the one in the picture. It may or may not be blooming at the time of your purchase.

We ship via USPS Priority Mail, If you don't get Free Shipping, then we calculate the shipping cost based on the weight and volume of your purchase.

Care instructions are included in every package you order. Please allow us up to 3 business days to process your order. Depending on your location, we will ship the plants on a certain day to avoid transit time during weekends or holidays. If you wish to receive your order on a specific date, or have special instructions, please add a note on your order. If you have any questions or comments, please feel free to contact us at any time.

  • Description
  • Key Plant Features

Looking for a plant that's as unique as you are? Look no further than the Medusa Head, also known as 'Euphorbia flanaganii', a beautiful member of Euphorbia genus!

In ancient Greek mythology, Medusa became a Gorgon, a female monster with snakes for hair and a gaze that could turn people into stone.  The plant's unique appearance, with its twisting, snake-like stems and tufts of green leaves at the top, is said to resemble the head of Medusa, who was known for her hair made of snakes. The name "Medusa head" is a reference to this mythological connection. And let's talk about those snake-like branches - they can spread up to 16 inches in diameter, giving this stunning medusa head succulent an almost pan-like shape.   

In the summer, clusters of yellow cyathium appear in the center of the plant at the tip of the stem; it's like having a tiny sun in your own home. This is definitely its most beautiful feature. Just wait until late winter or early spring, when tiny, brilliant yellow flowers cover this Euphorbia from head to toe.  It's truly a spectacle! 

With time, new pups will appear at the tips of its tendrils and form their own caudices - it's a never-ending cycle of bizarre beauty! This weird and wild succulent will continue to amaze as it grows into an even larger Medusa-like creation. This medusa head is exceptionally easy to propagate by divisions and cuttings so you can quickly grow your collection with just a few simple steps. So why wait? 

Give your plant collection some serious edge with 'Euphorbia flanaganii'. 

Watering Needs 

The Medusa head Euphorbia is a succulent that definitely stands out from the crowd! Unlike its desert-dwelling counterparts, this little guy doesn't do well with extended periods of drought. If you're lucky enough to be the proud owner of one of these unique plants, make sure to water it weekly during those hot summer months.  

When the soil is dry several inches below the surface, don't hesitate to give it a good soak. And get this - when your Medusa Head is feeling parched and in need of some hydration, it'll actually start curling its arms towards the center as if to say, "I'm thirsty!" So cute and clever!  

Just make sure not to overdo it and let them sit in standing water, or else they could develop root rot (yikes!). 

Light Requirements 

The medusa head is known for its hardiness, but it's best grown in bright, indirect sunlight and hot weather. To ensure the succulent thrives, provide 8-10 hours of bright but indirect light. Without enough light, photosynthesis rates drop, branches become thin, colors appear dull, there is an unhealthy look to the plant, and growth is stunted.  

Remember, learn to adjust your Medusa euphorbia to avoid burns if the location where you have the plant is exposed to direct sunlight. 

Optimal Soil & Fertilizer Needs 

The Euphorbia head medusa is like very airy, porous, nutrient-rich soil with a pH of 5.5 - 6.7, Succulents require fast-draining soil that dries completely between waterings. Your soil must have a sandy texture and a low water-holding capacity, just like desert soil.  Soggy wet soil can damage your flanaganii succulent and contributes to bacterial and fungal rot. In addition, because of a lack of oxygen, soggy soil substitutes air pockets with water, resulting in an anaerobic environment that can kill your plant. 

As an alternative, you can create your own potting mix by combining equal portions of perlite, coarse sand, and good natural potting soil. Ideally, you want to use our specialized potting mix that contains organic mycorrhizae to promote the development of a strong root system that helps your succulent to thrive.  

When it comes to fertilizing your medusas head plant, it only needs a small amount of fertilizer applied once a year in spring. Succulent prefers a fertilizer with lower doses of NPK, with a maximum ratio of 5-10-5 that is higher in phosphorus than nitrogen.

Hardiness Zones & More 

As desert dwellers, the Medusa head enjoys hot temperatures. They prefer constant temperatures above 70 degrees Fahrenheit and can tolerate triple digits in the summer, so don't worry if your succulent gets too hot.  

This Euphorbia, on the other hand, cannot handle frost, cold, or freezing temperatures, so make sure it doesn't get below 30 degrees F in its environment.  If grown outdoors, the medusa head grows best in USDA zone 9 - 11. 

Be sure to add Euphorbia flanaganii to your collection today and elevate the beauty of your home or garden with this stunning-looking plant. 

Bloom Season Spring
Botanical Name Euphorbia flanaganii
Common Name Medusa Head, Euphorbia caput medusae
Dormancy Winter
Family Euphorbiaceae
Flower Color Green, Yellow
Genus Euphorbia
Growth Habit Trailing, hanging
Growth Rate Fast
Hardiness Zone 9, 10, 11
Mature Size 8 in. tall, 16 in. wide
Native Area South Africa
Plant Type Succulent
Propagation By offsets
Resistance Drought tolerant, deer resistant, heat resistant
Soil PH 6.5, Acidic, Neutral
Soil Type Succulent potting mix soil,
Special Features Tendril like branches
Sun Exposure Full sun, partial shade
Toxicity Safe for humans, mildly toxic (Keep away from children)
Watering Needs Moderate

Pests & Common Problems of Medusa Head

Mealy bugs and spider mites commonly prey on these plants. The roots, needle-like leaves, and fruits of Europhobia flanaganii are depleted by mealybugs. As a result of their excretion of honeydew, the plant's surroundings begin to grow sooty mold.

The leaves turn yellow and start to dry out when the succulent is severely infested with these bugs. The shedding of leaves can be a sign of a severe infestation. 

You can get rid of mealybugs and spider mites by spraying the infested plant with a solution of liquid soap and water. Applying pesticides is another way to get rid of these pests. Use pesticides derived from plants like neem or pyrethrum.

Another method is to soak a piece of cotton wool in alcohol and dab it on the infested areas. Alternatively, you could use high-pressure water to physically flush the bugs out of the affected areas. Furthermore, too much water or poorly draining soil can develop root rot, so avoid overwatering these medusa's head. 

Medusa Head FAQs

Is Medusa's head poisonous? 

Medusa's head is toxic to humans and animals if ingested. It produces a milky sap that can cause skin irritation and eye damage if it comes into contact with the skin or eyes. It is important to handle this plant with care and keep it out of reach of children and pets. 

Is Medusa's head a cactus? 

Medusa's head is not a cactus but a succulent plant. While it may look similar to some cacti, it is actually a member of the Euphorbia family and is native to South Africa. Like cacti, it is adapted to arid environments and is able to store water in its thick stems. 

Does a Medusa plant flower? 

Yes, Medusa's head (Euphorbia flanaganii) can produce small bright yellow, insignificant flowers in the spring and summer. However, the plant is typically grown for its unique, sculptural form rather than its flowers. 

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy Policy and Terms of Service apply.

Be the first to share your unique experience using the product.