Silver Squill - Ledebouria Socialis &
Silver Squill - Ledebouria Socialis &
Silver Squill - Ledebouria Socialis &
Silver Squill - Ledebouria Socialis &
Silver Squill - Ledebouria Socialis &
Silver Squill - Ledebouria Socialis &
Silver Squill - Ledebouria Socialis &
Silver Squill - Ledebouria Socialis &
Silver Squill - Ledebouria Socialis &
Silver Squill - Ledebouria Socialis &
Silver Squill - Ledebouria Socialis &
Silver Squill - Ledebouria Socialis &
Silver Squill - Ledebouria Socialis &
Silver Squill - Ledebouria Socialis &
Silver Squill - Ledebouria Socialis &
Silver Squill - Ledebouria Socialis &

Introducing the drought & humidity tolerant Ledebouria socialis "Miner" that is commonly known as Silver Squill, Violet Squill, Leopard lily & Wood Hyacinth. It gets its common name silver squill because of its unique silver-grey foliage. This dwarf plant has a fast growth rate and reaches a height of up to 8 inches, with the most widely cultivated bulbs multiplying fast.

Silver Squill, a bulbous perennial plant in the Asparagaceae family, shares fleshy leaves with succulents but is not classified as a succulent. The 'Miner' variety of Ledebouria socialis stands out with its distinctive leaves. Its fleshy leaves store energy in its bulb. 

The leaves are elongated and have a beautiful silver-green coloration with dark green spots or markings. These markings resemble the spots found on a leopard's coat, hence this silver squill plant is also known as "Leopard Lily." The contrast between the silver background and the dark spots creates an eye-catching and visually appealing display. 

Interestingly, the variegated silver squill miner does flower very rarely, but in its natural habitat, the silver squill in early spring grows small green flowers or white-pale pink on pink stems emerge from the rosette-shaped foliage. They emerge from the center of the plant and add a touch of elegance to its overall appearance. However, it's important to note that the plant's main attraction lies in its foliage (delicate stems) rather than its flowers. 

Additionally, this silver squill has the ability to produce offsets or "pups." Ledebouria socialis propagation is best done through its teardrop-shaped bulbs formed by dividing tubers and rhizomes. As they mature, they can be separated and propagated to create new plants. This makes it a great option for those interested in expanding their succulent collection or sharing plants with friends.

This Silver squill leopard lily is winter dormant and native to eastern South Africa. It requires filtered sunlight for optimal growth. The squill plant is slightly frost-hardy. Plus, this silver squill variety is toxic to both humans and pets if consumed.  

Watering Needs 

Silver squill has minimal watering needs. It's important to strike a balance and avoid overwatering or underwatering this perennial plant. When watering your Silver squill plant, allow the top inch of soil to dry out before watering again. This will help prevent the risk of root rot. It's best to water it thoroughly and then let the excess water drain out completely. 

The watering needs of the silver squill ledebouria socialis include regular watering typically in its active growth period during spring and summer, but the soil should never be wet for long. In winter, cut down on watering. Observing the plant's leaves can also give you an indication of its watering needs. 

If the leaves start to appear wrinkled or droopy, it may be a sign that your Ledebouria socialis needs water. On the other hand, if the leaves become mushy or discolored, it could be a sign of overwatering. 

 Light Requirements 

Silver squill prefers bright, indirect light for at least 4-6 hours daily. The silver squill light requirement includes filtered sunlight. It thrives in minimal direct sunlight, but too much of it should be avoided as it can scorch the leaves. 

Place your Silver squill plant in a location where it can receive bright light throughout the day. A north or east-facing window is usually ideal for filtered or indirect light. If you don't have access to natural light, you can use artificial grow lights to provide the necessary light requirements for your Ledebouria socialis 'Miner'. 

Keep an eye on the leaves of your Silver Squill. If they start to turn yellow or pale, it may be a sign that your succulent is not receiving enough light. If, on the other hand, the leaves become bleached or develop brown spots, this could indicate that they have been exposed to too much direct sunlight. 

Remember to rotate your Ledebouria socialis occasionally to ensure even light exposure to all sides. This will help prevent the succulent plant from leaning or growing unevenly toward the light source. 

Optimal Soil & Fertilizer Needs 

For Silver Squill, it's best to use well-draining sandy soil that allows excess water to flow out easily. The silver squill soil should be humus rich. It should be sandy for good drainage. Fine to medium-grained is a good option. Ideally, you want to use our specialized succulent potting mix that contains 5 natural substrates and organic mycorrhizae to promote the development of a strong root system that helps your succulent to thrive. 

As for fertilizer, Silver Squill doesn't require heavy feeding. You can use a balanced fertilizer with NPK (5-10-5) during the growing season, which is typically in spring. During the dormant period in fall and winter, you can reduce or stop fertilizing altogether. Avoid over-fertilizing, as it can lead to nutrient burn and damage the plant's roots. 

 Hardiness Zone & More 

Silver Squill are typically grown as indoor plants in cooler climates. It is recommended to grow outdoors in USDA zones 9-11, which generally have average room temperatures between 65-75°F (typically when winter temperatures drop). It's important to avoid exposing it to temperatures below 50°F as it can cause damage to the foliage and overall health of the Ledebouria socialis

In terms of humidity, Silver Squill prefers moderate humidity levels, around 40- 60 %.You can achieve this by misting the leaves occasionally or placing a tray of water near the silver squill plant to increase humidity. However, it can still tolerate lower humidity levels, so it should do well if you are growing silver squill indoors. 

Plus, Silver Squill has various cultivars, including Juda, Paucifolia, and Violacea. As Silver squill 'Juda' has variegated leaves, silver squill 'Paucifolia' is shorter, and silver squill 'Violacea' has silvery white leaves with dark green spots. All these varieties are stunning on their own, but Ledebouria socialis 'Miner' is our favourite. So, what are you waiting for?? Add this cool silver squill plant to your collection today.

 

Bloom Season Early spring
Botanical Name Ledebouria socialis 'Miner'
Common Name Silver squill, Violet Squill, Leopard lily, Wood Hyacinth
Dormancy Winter
Family Asparagaceae
Flower Color Green, white, pale pink
Genus Ledebouria
Growth Habit Rosette
Growth Rate Fast
Hardiness Zone 9, 10, 11
Mature Size Up to 8 in. tall
Native Area South Africa
Plant Type Perennial dwarf plant
Propagation By pups, bulbs, cuttings
Resistance Drought tolerant, heat resistant, pest resistant, deer resistant
Soil PH 6.5, Acidic, Neutral
Soil Type specialized succulent potting mix
Special Features Showy flowers, unique foliage
Sun Exposure Full sun, partial shade
Toxicity Mildly toxic for humans, mildly toxic for pets
Watering Needs Low

Pests & Common Problems of Silver Squill

The Silver Squill is susceptible to several pests and problems. These can cause damage to the succulent by feeding on the leaves and stems, which can cause these outdoor plants (Ledebouria socialis miner) to become weak and stressed. 

Mealybugs: These small, white, cottony insects can infest the leaves and stems of silver squill plants. They suck sap from the plant, causing yellowing and stunted growth. 

Spider mites: These tiny pests can create fine webs on the leaves of silver squill. They feed on the mother plant sap, leading to yellowing, speckled leaves, and overall decline. 

Root rot: Overwatering or poorly draining soil can cause root rot in this leopard lily succulent. This fungal disease can lead to wilting, yellowing leaves, and root decay. 

Leaf spots: Fungal or bacterial infections or too little light can cause dark or discolored spots on the leaf edges of silver squill plants. These spots can spread and affect the new growth or overall health of the plant. 

Nutrient deficiencies: Insufficient or imbalanced nutrients can cause issues with Silver Squill's entire plant. Common deficiencies include yellowing leaves (nitrogen deficiency) or brown leaf tips (potassium deficiency). 

To prevent and address these problems, silver squill care involves ensuring proper watering, providing adequate light, and maintaining well-draining soil. Regularly inspect your plants for signs of pests and promptly treat any infestations. 

FAQs - Silver Squill Plant

Is Ledebouria an indoor plant? 

Yes, Ledebouria, including Silver Squill, is commonly grown as an indoor plant. It thrives in indoor environments with moderate to bright indirect light. Being an indoor plant, it is well-suited for containers and can be easily grown in small spaces.  

It’s compact size and low maintenance requirements make it a popular choice for indoor gardening enthusiasts. Additionally, it's compact size and attractive foliage with lance-shaped leaves (narrow & pointed) or teardrop leaves (slightly broader) make it a perfect addition to any indoor space. With proper care, it can add a touch of greenery and visual interest to your indoor spaces. 

Is silver squill poisonous? 

The silver squill, also known as Ledebouria socialis, is generally considered to be toxic to both humans and animals. It contains alkaloids and saponins, which can cause gastrointestinal distress if consumed in large quantities. It is important to keep silver squill out of reach of children and pets to prevent any potential poisoning incidents. 

Is silver squill a lily? 

No, Silver Squill (Ledebouria) is not a true lily. It may be called a "leopard lily" due to its unique spotted foliage that resembles the pattern of green leopard spots. The name "leopard lily" is a common nickname given to this plant because of its striking appearance.  

However, it is important to note that Silver Squill belongs to the Asparagaceae family, not the Lily family. While it may share some visual similarities with lilies, its botanical classification places it in a different group. So, while it may be called a "leopard lily," it is not a true lily. 

How big does silver squill get? 

Silver Squill (Ledebouria socialis) is a relatively dwarf perennial plant that typically reaches a height of about 6 to 8 inches. Its compact size makes it a great choice for indoor spaces, as it doesn't require a lot of room to thrive. The leaves of the Silver Squill can grow to be around 2 to 4 inches long and are usually narrow and pointed.  

While it may not be a large plant, its unique foliage and compact size make it a charming addition to any indoor garden or plant collection. So, if you're looking for a small and visually appealing plant, Silver Squill is a great choice!

Is silver squill a succulent? 

While Silver Squill (Ledebouria socialis) has fleshy leaves like succulents, it is not technically classified as a succulent. It belongs to the family Asparagaceae and is considered a bulbous perennial plant. 

The fleshy leaves of Silver Squill are not solely for water storage, but rather for energy storage in its bulb. So, while it may share some similarities with succulents, it falls into a different botanical category! 

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Silver Squill - Ledebouria Socialis 'Miner'

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Regular price$ 12.99
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Please note: All Landscape Ready plants that are in a 6-inch pot or larger WILL NOT come with a pot as it will be shipped bare root.

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Please note: Our large plants are many years old, and as a result, they might have minor scaring but will arrive 100% healthy and looking great.

Please note: Our large plants are shipped bare root. They are also many years old, and as a result, they might have minor scaring but will arrive healthy and looking great.

If you live in a cold climate and are expecting temperatures below 40 degrees within the next five days after placing your order, we highly recommend adding a heat pack to your order. If you do not order a heat pack, we do not send one with your order.

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**FREE HEAT PACK WITH ORDERS OVER $50 before taxes and shipping- BY REQUEST ONLY, PLEASE MAKE A NOTE ON YOUR ORDER.

To prevent plants from freezing while in transit, orders placed for areas with extreme severe freezing temperatures will be held for shipment until it is safe to ship.

Plants that are in 3.5" pots and smaller will be shipped in its pot to prevent any damage to the roots. Any plant that is 6" and larger WILL NOT come with a pot as it will be shipped bare root.

Depending on the species and season, you will receive a very similar plant to the one in the picture. It may or may not be blooming at the time of your purchase.

We ship via USPS Priority Mail, and we calculate the shipping cost based on the weight and volume of your purchase. Care instructions are included in every package you order. Please allow us up to 3 business days to process your order. Depending on your location, we will ship the plants on a certain day to avoid transit time during weekends or holidays. If you wish to receive your order on a specific date, or have special instructions, please add a note on your order. If you have any questions or comments, please feel free to contact us at any time.

  • Description
  • Key Plant Features

Introducing the drought & humidity tolerant Ledebouria socialis "Miner" that is commonly known as Silver Squill, Violet Squill, Leopard lily & Wood Hyacinth. It gets its common name silver squill because of its unique silver-grey foliage. This dwarf plant has a fast growth rate and reaches a height of up to 8 inches, with the most widely cultivated bulbs multiplying fast.

Silver Squill, a bulbous perennial plant in the Asparagaceae family, shares fleshy leaves with succulents but is not classified as a succulent. The 'Miner' variety of Ledebouria socialis stands out with its distinctive leaves. Its fleshy leaves store energy in its bulb. 

The leaves are elongated and have a beautiful silver-green coloration with dark green spots or markings. These markings resemble the spots found on a leopard's coat, hence this silver squill plant is also known as "Leopard Lily." The contrast between the silver background and the dark spots creates an eye-catching and visually appealing display. 

Interestingly, the variegated silver squill miner does flower very rarely, but in its natural habitat, the silver squill in early spring grows small green flowers or white-pale pink on pink stems emerge from the rosette-shaped foliage. They emerge from the center of the plant and add a touch of elegance to its overall appearance. However, it's important to note that the plant's main attraction lies in its foliage (delicate stems) rather than its flowers. 

Additionally, this silver squill has the ability to produce offsets or "pups." Ledebouria socialis propagation is best done through its teardrop-shaped bulbs formed by dividing tubers and rhizomes. As they mature, they can be separated and propagated to create new plants. This makes it a great option for those interested in expanding their succulent collection or sharing plants with friends.

This Silver squill leopard lily is winter dormant and native to eastern South Africa. It requires filtered sunlight for optimal growth. The squill plant is slightly frost-hardy. Plus, this silver squill variety is toxic to both humans and pets if consumed.  

Watering Needs 

Silver squill has minimal watering needs. It's important to strike a balance and avoid overwatering or underwatering this perennial plant. When watering your Silver squill plant, allow the top inch of soil to dry out before watering again. This will help prevent the risk of root rot. It's best to water it thoroughly and then let the excess water drain out completely. 

The watering needs of the silver squill ledebouria socialis include regular watering typically in its active growth period during spring and summer, but the soil should never be wet for long. In winter, cut down on watering. Observing the plant's leaves can also give you an indication of its watering needs. 

If the leaves start to appear wrinkled or droopy, it may be a sign that your Ledebouria socialis needs water. On the other hand, if the leaves become mushy or discolored, it could be a sign of overwatering. 

 Light Requirements 

Silver squill prefers bright, indirect light for at least 4-6 hours daily. The silver squill light requirement includes filtered sunlight. It thrives in minimal direct sunlight, but too much of it should be avoided as it can scorch the leaves. 

Place your Silver squill plant in a location where it can receive bright light throughout the day. A north or east-facing window is usually ideal for filtered or indirect light. If you don't have access to natural light, you can use artificial grow lights to provide the necessary light requirements for your Ledebouria socialis 'Miner'. 

Keep an eye on the leaves of your Silver Squill. If they start to turn yellow or pale, it may be a sign that your succulent is not receiving enough light. If, on the other hand, the leaves become bleached or develop brown spots, this could indicate that they have been exposed to too much direct sunlight. 

Remember to rotate your Ledebouria socialis occasionally to ensure even light exposure to all sides. This will help prevent the succulent plant from leaning or growing unevenly toward the light source. 

Optimal Soil & Fertilizer Needs 

For Silver Squill, it's best to use well-draining sandy soil that allows excess water to flow out easily. The silver squill soil should be humus rich. It should be sandy for good drainage. Fine to medium-grained is a good option. Ideally, you want to use our specialized succulent potting mix that contains 5 natural substrates and organic mycorrhizae to promote the development of a strong root system that helps your succulent to thrive. 

As for fertilizer, Silver Squill doesn't require heavy feeding. You can use a balanced fertilizer with NPK (5-10-5) during the growing season, which is typically in spring. During the dormant period in fall and winter, you can reduce or stop fertilizing altogether. Avoid over-fertilizing, as it can lead to nutrient burn and damage the plant's roots. 

 Hardiness Zone & More 

Silver Squill are typically grown as indoor plants in cooler climates. It is recommended to grow outdoors in USDA zones 9-11, which generally have average room temperatures between 65-75°F (typically when winter temperatures drop). It's important to avoid exposing it to temperatures below 50°F as it can cause damage to the foliage and overall health of the Ledebouria socialis

In terms of humidity, Silver Squill prefers moderate humidity levels, around 40- 60 %.You can achieve this by misting the leaves occasionally or placing a tray of water near the silver squill plant to increase humidity. However, it can still tolerate lower humidity levels, so it should do well if you are growing silver squill indoors. 

Plus, Silver Squill has various cultivars, including Juda, Paucifolia, and Violacea. As Silver squill 'Juda' has variegated leaves, silver squill 'Paucifolia' is shorter, and silver squill 'Violacea' has silvery white leaves with dark green spots. All these varieties are stunning on their own, but Ledebouria socialis 'Miner' is our favourite. So, what are you waiting for?? Add this cool silver squill plant to your collection today.

 

Bloom Season Early spring
Botanical Name Ledebouria socialis 'Miner'
Common Name Silver squill, Violet Squill, Leopard lily, Wood Hyacinth
Dormancy Winter
Family Asparagaceae
Flower Color Green, white, pale pink
Genus Ledebouria
Growth Habit Rosette
Growth Rate Fast
Hardiness Zone 9, 10, 11
Mature Size Up to 8 in. tall
Native Area South Africa
Plant Type Perennial dwarf plant
Propagation By pups, bulbs, cuttings
Resistance Drought tolerant, heat resistant, pest resistant, deer resistant
Soil PH 6.5, Acidic, Neutral
Soil Type specialized succulent potting mix
Special Features Showy flowers, unique foliage
Sun Exposure Full sun, partial shade
Toxicity Mildly toxic for humans, mildly toxic for pets
Watering Needs Low

Pests & Common Problems of Silver Squill

The Silver Squill is susceptible to several pests and problems. These can cause damage to the succulent by feeding on the leaves and stems, which can cause these outdoor plants (Ledebouria socialis miner) to become weak and stressed. 

Mealybugs: These small, white, cottony insects can infest the leaves and stems of silver squill plants. They suck sap from the plant, causing yellowing and stunted growth. 

Spider mites: These tiny pests can create fine webs on the leaves of silver squill. They feed on the mother plant sap, leading to yellowing, speckled leaves, and overall decline. 

Root rot: Overwatering or poorly draining soil can cause root rot in this leopard lily succulent. This fungal disease can lead to wilting, yellowing leaves, and root decay. 

Leaf spots: Fungal or bacterial infections or too little light can cause dark or discolored spots on the leaf edges of silver squill plants. These spots can spread and affect the new growth or overall health of the plant. 

Nutrient deficiencies: Insufficient or imbalanced nutrients can cause issues with Silver Squill's entire plant. Common deficiencies include yellowing leaves (nitrogen deficiency) or brown leaf tips (potassium deficiency). 

To prevent and address these problems, silver squill care involves ensuring proper watering, providing adequate light, and maintaining well-draining soil. Regularly inspect your plants for signs of pests and promptly treat any infestations. 

FAQs - Silver Squill Plant

Is Ledebouria an indoor plant? 

Yes, Ledebouria, including Silver Squill, is commonly grown as an indoor plant. It thrives in indoor environments with moderate to bright indirect light. Being an indoor plant, it is well-suited for containers and can be easily grown in small spaces.  

It’s compact size and low maintenance requirements make it a popular choice for indoor gardening enthusiasts. Additionally, it's compact size and attractive foliage with lance-shaped leaves (narrow & pointed) or teardrop leaves (slightly broader) make it a perfect addition to any indoor space. With proper care, it can add a touch of greenery and visual interest to your indoor spaces. 

Is silver squill poisonous? 

The silver squill, also known as Ledebouria socialis, is generally considered to be toxic to both humans and animals. It contains alkaloids and saponins, which can cause gastrointestinal distress if consumed in large quantities. It is important to keep silver squill out of reach of children and pets to prevent any potential poisoning incidents. 

Is silver squill a lily? 

No, Silver Squill (Ledebouria) is not a true lily. It may be called a "leopard lily" due to its unique spotted foliage that resembles the pattern of green leopard spots. The name "leopard lily" is a common nickname given to this plant because of its striking appearance.  

However, it is important to note that Silver Squill belongs to the Asparagaceae family, not the Lily family. While it may share some visual similarities with lilies, its botanical classification places it in a different group. So, while it may be called a "leopard lily," it is not a true lily. 

How big does silver squill get? 

Silver Squill (Ledebouria socialis) is a relatively dwarf perennial plant that typically reaches a height of about 6 to 8 inches. Its compact size makes it a great choice for indoor spaces, as it doesn't require a lot of room to thrive. The leaves of the Silver Squill can grow to be around 2 to 4 inches long and are usually narrow and pointed.  

While it may not be a large plant, its unique foliage and compact size make it a charming addition to any indoor garden or plant collection. So, if you're looking for a small and visually appealing plant, Silver Squill is a great choice!

Is silver squill a succulent? 

While Silver Squill (Ledebouria socialis) has fleshy leaves like succulents, it is not technically classified as a succulent. It belongs to the family Asparagaceae and is considered a bulbous perennial plant. 

The fleshy leaves of Silver Squill are not solely for water storage, but rather for energy storage in its bulb. So, while it may share some similarities with succulents, it falls into a different botanical category! 

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