Wandering Jew - Spiderwort &
Wandering Jew - Spiderwort &
Wandering Jew - Spiderwort &
Wandering Jew - Spiderwort &
Wandering Jew - Spiderwort &
Wandering Jew - Spiderwort &
Wandering Jew - Spiderwort &
Wandering Jew - Spiderwort &
Wandering Jew - Spiderwort &
Wandering Jew - Spiderwort &
Wandering Jew - Spiderwort &
Wandering Jew - Spiderwort &
Wandering Jew - Spiderwort &
Wandering Jew - Spiderwort &
Wandering Jew - Spiderwort &
Wandering Jew - Spiderwort &
Wandering Jew - Spiderwort &
Wandering Jew - Spiderwort &
Wandering Jew - Spiderwort &
Wandering Jew - Spiderwort &
Wandering Jew - Spiderwort &
Wandering Jew - Spiderwort &
Wandering Jew - Spiderwort &
Wandering Jew - Spiderwort &
Wandering Jew - Spiderwort &
Wandering Jew - Spiderwort &
Wandering Jew - Spiderwort &
Wandering Jew - Spiderwort &
Wandering Jew - Spiderwort &
Wandering Jew - Spiderwort &
Wandering Jew - Spiderwort &
Wandering Jew - Spiderwort &

Introducing the wandering Jew or spiderwort plant, also known as Tradescantia Nanouk' or fantasy Venice a stunning member of the Tradescantia. The wandering Jew plant lush leaves are adorned with beautiful pink, white, purple, and green stripes that create an eye-catching pattern, it looks stunning standing upright, just wait until you see it trailing gracefully like ivy.  And let's not forget about the small white and pale pink flowers with yellow stamen that peek through its pink buds during the growing season - it's truly a sight to behold!  

Hailing from South Arica, this beautiful spiderwort wandering jew is easy to grow can reach height of almost up to 2 feet, and quick to thrive thanks to its patented development by Dutch cultivators in 2012, who wanted to create a more robust Tradescantia with showier blooms.   

So, if you're looking for a showstopper of a tradescantia that resembles tradescantia pallida (Purple heart plant) but with even more pizazz...look no further than 'Tradescantia wandering jew'! 

Watering Needs 

Often, people worry they aren't giving their plants enough water when in reality they are over-watering them. This is especially the case with wandering Jews as they don't do well in moist soil which can result in root rot and yellowing or browning of the leaves.  

It's best to wait until the top two inches of soil are completely dry before watering. Watch out for signs of dehydration such as a pale discoloration and shriveled stem indicating that the nanouk plant is consuming its interior water supply.  

Besides hydrating correctly, it's also crucial to ensure that the potting soil drains quickly to avoid damaging the perennial plant roots. As drought-tolerant plants, the wandering Jew can thrive with less frequent watering and if you forget to water them for a month or more, they will probably survive just fine. 

Light Requirements 

Providing enough light for these wandering Jew or spiderwort plants is one of the most important aspects of their care. It is important to grow Tradescantia nanouk in areas that receive at least 4-6 hours of bright, indirect light every day to keep them happy, as direct sunlight can scorch its leaves. 

If indoors, place your spiderwort plant directly in front of a west- or south-facing window. If the plant is getting too much light, the leaves may turn brown or yellow.  If they don't receive enough light, their stems may grow leggy and become paler or lose their variegation; so, make your nanouk plant happy and give it plenty of light. 

Optimal Soil & Fertilizer Needs 

The wandering Jew or spiderwort like very airy, porous, nutrient-rich soil with a pH of 5.6- 6.5, it requires fast-draining soil that dries completely between waterings. Your soil must have a sandy texture and a low water-holding capacity, just like desert soil.  Soggy wet soil can damage your plant and contributes to bacterial and fungal rot. In addition, because of a lack of oxygen, soggy soil substitutes air pockets with water, resulting in an anaerobic environment that can kill your nanouk. 

As an alternative, you can create your own potting mix by combining equal portions of perlite, coarse sand, and good natural potting soil. Ideally, you want to use our specialized potting mix that contains organic mycorrhizae to promote the development of a strong root system that helps your wandering Jew to thrive. 

Natural fertilizers with an equal mixture of NPK (5-10-5) also last longer and keep your soil alive by adding other beneficial compounds and microbes that encourage nanouk plant health and nutrient absorption. So, skip those harsh chemicals and give your Tradescantia some love with some awesome natural fertilizer! 

Hardiness Zones & More 

The wandering Jew can't stand frost or too much humidity, therefore it needs warm, dry conditions. A well-draining potting mix and drainage holes in the potting container will help you maintain temperatures and prevent too much moisture. They can therefore be cultivated outside in USDA zones 10-12.  

The ideal temperature for a wandering Jew plant is 65-75 degrees Fahrenheit, it can survive moderate winter temperatures as long as the soil is not wet, and the temperature does not drop below 50 degrees F. They ought to be overwintered indoors to prevent harm from freezing weather. 

Be sure to add 'Tradescantia albiflora Nanouk' to your home or garden and enjoy its low maintenance care, while admiring its impressive display year after year. 

Bloom Season Spring, summer
Botanical Name Tradescantia 'Nanouk'
Common Name Wandering Jew, spiderwort, Tradescantia Nanouk', fantasy Venice, nanouk plant
Dormancy Winter
Family Commelinaceae
Flower Color White, light pink
Genus Tradescantia
Growth Habit Trailing, hanging
Growth Rate Fast
Hardiness Zone 10, 11, 12
Mature Size 2 feet tall
Native Area South Africa
Plant Type Perennial succulent
Propagation By stem cuttings
Resistance Drought tolerant, heat resistant, pest resistant, deer resistant
Soil PH 6.5, Acidic, Neutral
Soil Type specialized succulent potting mix
Special Features Showy flowers, unique foliage
Sun Exposure Full sun, partial shade
Toxicity Mild toxic for humans, mild toxic for pets (Keep away from Children)
Watering Needs Low

Pests & Common Problems of Wandering Jew

Tradescantia nanouk is durable and simple to grow. It doesn't happen very often for you to have problems with it. Let's go over the ones that might appear! 

Only two pests, mealybugs, and spider mites, frequently attack this spiderwort plant. Both insects are sucking pests that consume the plant's leaf juices. Both can make the healthy leaves unappealing, despite the fact that they are unlikely to spread diseases. It is critical to eliminate pests as soon as they appear. 

For mealybugs: To get rid of them, simply dab the insects with a cotton swab dipped in 70% isopropyl rubbing alcohol. Until they are gone, repeat this procedure every week. 

For scale insects: Using a pair of heavy gloves, you can remove scale insects from the plant. 

The most common problems are: 

Fungal diseases can also be a problem if the plant is kept in a poorly ventilated area, as the moisture can encourage the growth of mold and mildew. 

Overwatering can cause the roots of the nanouk plant to rot, which can lead to a number of problems. When the roots are damaged, the plant is unable to take up water and nutrients, and the leaves may start to wilt and turn yellow or brown.  

FAQs - Wandering Jew Post

Is wandering Jew an indoor plant? 

The wandering Jew is a low-maintenance plant that is easy to care for and can thrive indoors as long as it receives enough light and moisture. If you provide your wandering Jew plant with more bright light, it will bloom more profusely.  

Lack of sunlight will cause the foliage's vibrant colors to fade. It can be grown in a pot or a hanging basket and is often used as a decorative plant in homes and offices. It is also an excellent air purifier that can help to improve the air quality in your home. 

How do you take care of Tradescantia Nanouk? 

The nanouk plant is a low-maintenance plant that is easy to take care of, prefers bright indirect light, a well-drained potting mix, is hardy in USDA zones 10-12, and requires minimal watering.

Don't overwater it, as this can rot the roots. It can also benefit from a light fertilizer once a year during the growing season. Occasional pruning can help to encourage bushier growth and remove any dead or damaged leaves. Keep an eye on your plant and adjust your care routine as needed based on its individual needs. 

Is Wandering jew poisonous? 

The wandering Jew is not considered toxic to humans or pets, which means that it is safe to have in your home even if you have young children or pets. However, it is still important to keep plants out of reach of children and pets to prevent accidental ingestion or damage to the plant. If you have any concerns about the safety of your plants, you can always consult with a veterinarian or a poison control center. 

Is the Wandering Jew plant edible? 

The wandering Jew plant (Tradescantia) produces small, delicate flowers that are edible and can be used as a decorative addition to salads or desserts. However, the plant's fruit is not typically ingested and there is little information available on its edibility or nutritional value. While some sources suggest that the plant's fruit may be edible, it is important to note that the plant is not commonly ingested as food and may not be safe for human consumption.  

Additionally, some people may have allergic reactions to the plant, so it is best to avoid eating it unless you have specific information about its safety and edibility. 

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Wandering Jew - Spiderwort 'Tradescantia albiflora Nanouk'

sku: 2275

Regular price$ 13.50
/

Free Shipping on all orders over $89*


Size
Height:
Diameter:
Height: 8"-10"
Diameter:

Please note: All Landscape Ready plants that are in a 6-inch pot or larger WILL NOT come with a pot as it will be shipped bare root.

  • Low stock - 4 items left
  • Inventory on the way

Please note: Our large plants are many years old, and as a result, they might have minor scaring but will arrive 100% healthy and looking great.

Please note: Our large plants are shipped bare root. They are also many years old, and as a result, they might have minor scaring but will arrive healthy and looking great.

sku:

If you live in a cold climate and are expecting temperatures below 40 degrees within the next five days after placing your order, we highly recommend adding a heat pack to your order. If you do not order a heat pack, we do not send one with your order.

BUY HEAT PACKS HERE

**FREE HEAT PACK WITH ORDERS OVER $50 before taxes and shipping- BY REQUEST ONLY, PLEASE MAKE A NOTE ON YOUR ORDER.

To prevent plants from freezing while in transit, orders placed for areas with extreme severe freezing temperatures will be held for shipment until it is safe to ship.

FREE SHIPPING ON ALL ORDERS OVER $89 in the
Continental US.

Plants that are in 3.5" pots and smaller will be shipped in its pot to prevent any damage to the roots.

Any plant that is 6" and larger WILL NOT come with a pot as it will be shipped bare root.

Depending on the species and season, you will receive a very similar plant to the one in the picture. It may or may not be blooming at the time of your purchase.

We ship via USPS Priority Mail, If you don't get Free Shipping, then we calculate the shipping cost based on the weight and volume of your purchase.

Care instructions are included in every package you order. Please allow us up to 3 business days to process your order. Depending on your location, we will ship the plants on a certain day to avoid transit time during weekends or holidays. If you wish to receive your order on a specific date, or have special instructions, please add a note on your order. If you have any questions or comments, please feel free to contact us at any time.

  • Description
  • Key Plant Features

Introducing the wandering Jew or spiderwort plant, also known as Tradescantia Nanouk' or fantasy Venice a stunning member of the Tradescantia. The wandering Jew plant lush leaves are adorned with beautiful pink, white, purple, and green stripes that create an eye-catching pattern, it looks stunning standing upright, just wait until you see it trailing gracefully like ivy.  And let's not forget about the small white and pale pink flowers with yellow stamen that peek through its pink buds during the growing season - it's truly a sight to behold!  

Hailing from South Arica, this beautiful spiderwort wandering jew is easy to grow can reach height of almost up to 2 feet, and quick to thrive thanks to its patented development by Dutch cultivators in 2012, who wanted to create a more robust Tradescantia with showier blooms.   

So, if you're looking for a showstopper of a tradescantia that resembles tradescantia pallida (Purple heart plant) but with even more pizazz...look no further than 'Tradescantia wandering jew'! 

Watering Needs 

Often, people worry they aren't giving their plants enough water when in reality they are over-watering them. This is especially the case with wandering Jews as they don't do well in moist soil which can result in root rot and yellowing or browning of the leaves.  

It's best to wait until the top two inches of soil are completely dry before watering. Watch out for signs of dehydration such as a pale discoloration and shriveled stem indicating that the nanouk plant is consuming its interior water supply.  

Besides hydrating correctly, it's also crucial to ensure that the potting soil drains quickly to avoid damaging the perennial plant roots. As drought-tolerant plants, the wandering Jew can thrive with less frequent watering and if you forget to water them for a month or more, they will probably survive just fine. 

Light Requirements 

Providing enough light for these wandering Jew or spiderwort plants is one of the most important aspects of their care. It is important to grow Tradescantia nanouk in areas that receive at least 4-6 hours of bright, indirect light every day to keep them happy, as direct sunlight can scorch its leaves. 

If indoors, place your spiderwort plant directly in front of a west- or south-facing window. If the plant is getting too much light, the leaves may turn brown or yellow.  If they don't receive enough light, their stems may grow leggy and become paler or lose their variegation; so, make your nanouk plant happy and give it plenty of light. 

Optimal Soil & Fertilizer Needs 

The wandering Jew or spiderwort like very airy, porous, nutrient-rich soil with a pH of 5.6- 6.5, it requires fast-draining soil that dries completely between waterings. Your soil must have a sandy texture and a low water-holding capacity, just like desert soil.  Soggy wet soil can damage your plant and contributes to bacterial and fungal rot. In addition, because of a lack of oxygen, soggy soil substitutes air pockets with water, resulting in an anaerobic environment that can kill your nanouk. 

As an alternative, you can create your own potting mix by combining equal portions of perlite, coarse sand, and good natural potting soil. Ideally, you want to use our specialized potting mix that contains organic mycorrhizae to promote the development of a strong root system that helps your wandering Jew to thrive. 

Natural fertilizers with an equal mixture of NPK (5-10-5) also last longer and keep your soil alive by adding other beneficial compounds and microbes that encourage nanouk plant health and nutrient absorption. So, skip those harsh chemicals and give your Tradescantia some love with some awesome natural fertilizer! 

Hardiness Zones & More 

The wandering Jew can't stand frost or too much humidity, therefore it needs warm, dry conditions. A well-draining potting mix and drainage holes in the potting container will help you maintain temperatures and prevent too much moisture. They can therefore be cultivated outside in USDA zones 10-12.  

The ideal temperature for a wandering Jew plant is 65-75 degrees Fahrenheit, it can survive moderate winter temperatures as long as the soil is not wet, and the temperature does not drop below 50 degrees F. They ought to be overwintered indoors to prevent harm from freezing weather. 

Be sure to add 'Tradescantia albiflora Nanouk' to your home or garden and enjoy its low maintenance care, while admiring its impressive display year after year. 

Bloom Season Spring, summer
Botanical Name Tradescantia 'Nanouk'
Common Name Wandering Jew, spiderwort, Tradescantia Nanouk', fantasy Venice, nanouk plant
Dormancy Winter
Family Commelinaceae
Flower Color White, light pink
Genus Tradescantia
Growth Habit Trailing, hanging
Growth Rate Fast
Hardiness Zone 10, 11, 12
Mature Size 2 feet tall
Native Area South Africa
Plant Type Perennial succulent
Propagation By stem cuttings
Resistance Drought tolerant, heat resistant, pest resistant, deer resistant
Soil PH 6.5, Acidic, Neutral
Soil Type specialized succulent potting mix
Special Features Showy flowers, unique foliage
Sun Exposure Full sun, partial shade
Toxicity Mild toxic for humans, mild toxic for pets (Keep away from Children)
Watering Needs Low

Pests & Common Problems of Wandering Jew

Tradescantia nanouk is durable and simple to grow. It doesn't happen very often for you to have problems with it. Let's go over the ones that might appear! 

Only two pests, mealybugs, and spider mites, frequently attack this spiderwort plant. Both insects are sucking pests that consume the plant's leaf juices. Both can make the healthy leaves unappealing, despite the fact that they are unlikely to spread diseases. It is critical to eliminate pests as soon as they appear. 

For mealybugs: To get rid of them, simply dab the insects with a cotton swab dipped in 70% isopropyl rubbing alcohol. Until they are gone, repeat this procedure every week. 

For scale insects: Using a pair of heavy gloves, you can remove scale insects from the plant. 

The most common problems are: 

Fungal diseases can also be a problem if the plant is kept in a poorly ventilated area, as the moisture can encourage the growth of mold and mildew. 

Overwatering can cause the roots of the nanouk plant to rot, which can lead to a number of problems. When the roots are damaged, the plant is unable to take up water and nutrients, and the leaves may start to wilt and turn yellow or brown.  

FAQs - Wandering Jew Post

Is wandering Jew an indoor plant? 

The wandering Jew is a low-maintenance plant that is easy to care for and can thrive indoors as long as it receives enough light and moisture. If you provide your wandering Jew plant with more bright light, it will bloom more profusely.  

Lack of sunlight will cause the foliage's vibrant colors to fade. It can be grown in a pot or a hanging basket and is often used as a decorative plant in homes and offices. It is also an excellent air purifier that can help to improve the air quality in your home. 

How do you take care of Tradescantia Nanouk? 

The nanouk plant is a low-maintenance plant that is easy to take care of, prefers bright indirect light, a well-drained potting mix, is hardy in USDA zones 10-12, and requires minimal watering.

Don't overwater it, as this can rot the roots. It can also benefit from a light fertilizer once a year during the growing season. Occasional pruning can help to encourage bushier growth and remove any dead or damaged leaves. Keep an eye on your plant and adjust your care routine as needed based on its individual needs. 

Is Wandering jew poisonous? 

The wandering Jew is not considered toxic to humans or pets, which means that it is safe to have in your home even if you have young children or pets. However, it is still important to keep plants out of reach of children and pets to prevent accidental ingestion or damage to the plant. If you have any concerns about the safety of your plants, you can always consult with a veterinarian or a poison control center. 

Is the Wandering Jew plant edible? 

The wandering Jew plant (Tradescantia) produces small, delicate flowers that are edible and can be used as a decorative addition to salads or desserts. However, the plant's fruit is not typically ingested and there is little information available on its edibility or nutritional value. While some sources suggest that the plant's fruit may be edible, it is important to note that the plant is not commonly ingested as food and may not be safe for human consumption.  

Additionally, some people may have allergic reactions to the plant, so it is best to avoid eating it unless you have specific information about its safety and edibility. 

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