Carrion Plant - Stapelia gigantea
Carrion Plant - Stapelia gigantea
Carrion Plant - Stapelia gigantea
Carrion Plant - Stapelia gigantea
Carrion Plant - Stapelia gigantea
Carrion Plant - Stapelia gigantea
Carrion Plant - Stapelia gigantea
Carrion Plant - Stapelia gigantea
Carrion Plant - Stapelia gigantea
Carrion Plant - Stapelia gigantea
Carrion Plant - Stapelia gigantea
Carrion Plant - Stapelia gigantea
Carrion Plant - Stapelia gigantea
Carrion Plant - Stapelia gigantea
Carrion Plant - Stapelia gigantea
Carrion Plant - Stapelia gigantea
Carrion Plant - Stapelia gigantea
Carrion Plant - Stapelia gigantea
Carrion Plant - Stapelia gigantea
Carrion Plant - Stapelia gigantea
Carrion Plant - Stapelia gigantea
Carrion Plant - Stapelia gigantea
Carrion Plant - Stapelia gigantea
Carrion Plant - Stapelia gigantea
Carrion Plant - Stapelia gigantea

Introducing the Carrion plant; also known as Stapelia gigantea, that belongs to the Stapelia genus. Hailing all the way from South Africa, the Stapelia gigantea is known for having the largest flowers of almost any succulent in the world.

The Stapelia gigantea has several other common names, such as carrion flowers, starfish plant, starfish flower, toad plant, and zulu giant plant. The term "carrion" is specifically used to describe the decaying flesh of dead animals. It is derived from the Latin word "caro," meaning flesh. This Stapelia gigantea gets its common name because of its flowers, which emit a strong odor and resemble the smell of rotting meat.  

Stapelia gigantea is a spineless stem succulent that resembles a cactus; can grow up to 2 feet tall and may form big clumps when growing up to 3 feet wide. These thick, fleshy stems are ribbed and have a green coloration, with some variations in shades. 

The Carrion has Huge Flowers 


The flowers of the Stapelia gigantea are large, about 15 inches, and star-shaped; they bloom during the fall.

They have pale yellow to reddish brown hues adorned with intricate patterns and markings. The petals are thick and fleshy, and they curve backward, giving the flowers a star-like appearance.

The carrion flowers smell like rotten flesh; although this sounds disgusting, it helps attract flies and other pollinators to the Stapelia gigantea.

Interestingly, it also looks like drying flesh pealing from the bone and also fringes of soft white hairs on the corolla segments superficially resembling a layer of mold growing on rotting matter.  

The cluster of flowers arises near the base of a branch; on this carrion plant, the inflorescence had two buds with scale-like leaves at the base of the petioles.

Despite their unusual smell, the flowers of the Stapelia gigantea can be quite beautiful and captivating. They are a testament to the diversity and uniqueness of nature. If you ever come across these flowers, be sure to take a moment to appreciate their intricate beauty, even if the smell might not be to everyone's liking! 

Watering Needs 

Like other succulents, Stapelia gigantea are adapted to survive in arid conditions, so they have a unique way of storing water in their fleshy stems and leaves.

When it comes to watering your Stapelia gigantea carrion plant, it's best to follow the "soak and dry" method. This means that you should thoroughly water your succulent plant until the water drains out from the bottom of the pot, and then allow the soil to dry out completely before watering again. This helps prevent overwatering and ensures that the roots don't sit in excess moisture, which can lead to root rot. 

In the spring and fall, during the active growing season, you can water the carrion flower plant about once every 2-3 weeks. However, depending on the specific conditions in your environment, you should adjust the frequency. Factors such as temperature, humidity, and the type of soil mixed can affect the watering needs of the plant.

In the winter during the dormant period, when your Stapelia gigantea plant is not actively growing, you should reduce watering even further. It's best to allow the soil to dry out completely between watering and water sparingly, only when it shows signs of thirst, such as wrinkled stems or leaves. 

Remember, it's always better to underwater than to overwater the carrion plant. If in doubt, it's safer to wait for the soil to dry out before watering again. This will help prevent any potential issues related to overwatering and promote the overall health of your carrion plant. 

Light Requirements

When it comes to growing your Stapelia gigantea indoors, it thrives in bright, indirect light. Place it near a window where it can receive bright, filtered sunlight for 4-6 hours a day. Avoid placing it in direct sunlight, as the intense rays can scorch the leaves and cause damage to the carrion plant. If you notice that the stems are stretching or leaning toward the light source, it's a sign that it needs more light. In that case, you can consider supplementing with artificial grow lights to provide the necessary brightness. 

If you decide to grow the Stapelia gigantea outdoors, it works best in partial sun or light shade. It can tolerate some direct sunlight, especially during the morning or late afternoon, but it's best to avoid the scorching midday sun. A location with dappled sunlight or a spot under a tree that provides filtered light can be ideal for the carrion plant. Just make sure it still gets enough brightness to thrive. 

Remember, finding the right balance of light is crucial for the health of the Stapelia gigantea. Too much direct sunlight can cause sunburn and damage the plant, while insufficient light can lead to weak growth and poor blooming. Observing your Stapelia's response to light and making adjustments accordingly will help ensure its well-being. 

Optimal Soil & Fertilizer Needs

When it comes to the soil requirements for your Stapelia gigantea plant, it prefers a well-draining soil mix. You can create a suitable blend by combining equal parts of potting soil, perlite, and coarse sand. This mixture allows excess water to drain away efficiently, preventing the roots from sitting in soggy soil, which can lead to root rot. Remember to choose a pot with drainage holes to further aid in proper drainage. Instead, make or buy a well-draining potting mix, or ideally, use our specialized succulent potting mix that contains 5 natural substrates and mycorrhizae to promote the development of a strong root system that helps your succulent to thrive. 

The Stapelia gigantea carrion plant doesn't require frequent fertilization, but it can benefit from light feeding during the growing season. Fertilize once a year during the growing season in the spring with a balanced fertilizer diluted to ½ the strength recommended on the label.   Dilute the fertilizer according to the instructions and apply it to the soil once a year in the spring. Be cautious not to over-fertilize, as this can result in excessive growth with fewer blooms. This provides a slow-release source of nutrients and helps improve the overall soil structure. 

Remember, it's important to monitor your Stapelia gigantea response to fertilization and adjust accordingly. If you notice any signs of nutrient deficiencies or excessive growth, you can make adjustments to the fertilizer regimen. 

Hardiness Zone & More 

The Stapelia gigantea is native to warm, tropical regions, so it thrives in indoor environments where temperatures are consistently between 60°F to 80°F. It prefers bright, indirect light, so placing it near a window with filtered sunlight works well. In terms of humidity, this plant can tolerate average indoor humidity levels, but it appreciates a slightly higher humidity level. You can increase humidity by placing a tray of water near the plant or by using a humidifier. 

In regions where the climate is warm and frost-free, you can also grow the Stapelia gigantea outdoors. It is suitable for USDA zones 10 to 12 and needs a cool, dry rest period in winter but keeps above 30°F and avoids any frost. It can tolerate higher temperatures, but it's essential to provide some protection from the intense midday sun, especially in hotter climates. In terms of humidity, the Stapelia gigantea can handle a range of humidity levels, but it appreciates moderate to high humidity. 

Remember to acclimate your Stapelia gigantea gradually when transitioning it from indoor to outdoor or vice versa. Sudden changes in temperature or light can stress your carrion plant. Take care to protect the plant from extreme weather conditions like frost or excessive heat. 

Additionally, Stapelia gigantea propagation by stem cuttings is a common method used by gardeners and plant enthusiasts. With proper care and attention, the stem cuttings will develop roots and grow into new Carrion plants.  

The Bottom Line 

Overall, the Stapelia gigantea (Carrion plant) is unique and captivating, with its large, star-shaped flowers that have distinctive carrion-like scent, hence known as carrion flowers. It is a low-maintenance succulent plant that thrives in bright, indirect light and well-draining soil. The Stapelia gigantea is also known for its ability to attract pollinators like flies, making it a great addition to any garden or indoor collection.

So, if you're looking for a striking and low-maintenance succulent for your rock gardens, the Carrion Plant Stapelia gigantea is definitely worth considering! 

Bloom Season Fall
Botanical Name Stapelia gigantea
Common Name Carrion plant, Carrion flower
Dormancy Winter
Family Apocynaceae
Flower Color Pale yellow, reddish brown
Genus Stapelia
Growth Habit Shrubby, spineless
Growth Rate Fast
Hardiness Zone 10, 11, 12
Mature Size 2 ft. tall, 3 ft. wide
Native Area South Africa
Plant Type Succulent
Propagation By stem cuttings
Resistance Drought tolerant, heat resistance
Soil PH 6.5, Acidic, Neutral
Soil Type specialized succulent potting mix
Special Features Largest flowers
Sun Exposure Full sun, partial shade
Toxicity Mildly toxic for humanss, mildly toxic for pets
Watering Needs Low

Pests & Common Problems of the Stapelia gigantea

The Stapelia gigantea carrion flower plant is a resilient succulent, but it can still face a few common problems and pests. The most common are:

Mealybugs: These small, white, cotton-like insects can infest your carrion plant and cause damage. You can remove them by gently wiping them off with a cotton swab dipped in rubbing alcohol.

Scale insects: These pests appear as small, brown, or black bumps on the stems of the Stapelia gigantea plant. They can be removed by gently scraping them off with a soft brush or cloth.

Root rot: Overwatering or poor drainage can lead to root rot in the Stapelia gigantea. To prevent this, make sure the soil is well-drained and allow it to dry out between waterings.

Fungal diseases: Excessive moisture or high humidity can create conditions for fungal diseases like powdery mildew or black spots. To prevent these, avoid overwatering and ensure good air circulation around the Stapelia gigantea.

Lack of blooms: If your Stapelia gigantea is not blooming, it may be due to insufficient light or improper care. Make sure the plant is getting enough bright, indirect light and provide it with the right conditions for growth.

Remember, prevention is key when it comes to pests and problems. Regularly inspect your plant for any signs of pests or diseases and provide it with the proper care to keep it healthy and thriving. 

FAQs of Stapelia gigantea

What does Stapelia gigantea smell like? 

The Stapelia gigantea carrion flowers have a leathery texture that mimics the rotting flesh of a dead animal (like meat and fat rotting in the hot sun). This distinctive smell is actually what attracts flies and other pollinators to the flowers.  

They remember drying flesh peeling back from the bone and also fringes of soft white hairs on the corolla segments superficially resembling a layer of mold growing on rotting matter. The Stapelia gigantea is a carrion plant, and the foul odor helps it attract flies, which then aid in the pollination process. 

Is the carrion plant a cactus? 

No, the carrion plant, also known as the Stapelia gigantea, is not a cactus. It is a succulent plant. While cacti are a type of succulent, not all succulents are cacti. The carrion plant belongs to the genus Stapelia and has its own unique characteristics and growth habits. 

What is Stapelia gigantea used for in medicine? 

The Stapelia gigantea (Carrion flower or carrion plant) has been used in traditional medicine for its potential medicinal properties. Some traditional healers believe that it may have antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory, and analgesic properties.  

However, it's important to note that scientific research on the medicinal uses of Stapelia gigantea is limited, and more studies are needed to validate its potential benefits. As always, it's best to consult with a healthcare professional before using any plant for medicinal purposes. 

Is Stapelia gigantea toxic? 

Yes, the Stapelia gigantea is considered to be mildly toxic for humans and pets. The carrion plant contains compounds that can cause gastrointestinal discomfort if consumed. It's important to keep it out of the reach of children and pets to avoid any potential issues. If accidental ingestion occurs, it's best to seek medical advice immediately. Safety should always be a priority when dealing with plants, especially if there are any concerns about toxicity.   

Why is my Stapelia gigantea turning black? 

Stapelia gigantea may turn black due to rot, fungal infection, overwatering, or poor drainage. It may also be a natural part of the plant's lifecycle, as some species develop darkened areas as they mature. If blackening is accompanied by wilting or distress, it's best to closely examine your carrion plant and adjust its care. 

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Carrion Plant - Stapelia gigantea

sku: 1694

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Regular price$ 14.29
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Please note: All Landscape Ready plants that are in a 6-inch pot or larger WILL NOT come with a pot as it will be shipped bare root.

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Please note: Our large plants are many years old, and as a result, they might have minor scaring but will arrive 100% healthy and looking great.

Please note: Our large plants are shipped bare root. They are also many years old, and as a result, they might have minor scaring but will arrive healthy and looking great.

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If you live in a cold climate and are expecting temperatures below 40 degrees within the next five days after placing your order, we highly recommend adding a heat pack to your order. If you do not order a heat pack, we do not send one with your order.

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Plants that are in 3.5" pots and smaller will be shipped in its pot to prevent any damage to the roots.

Any plant that is 6" and larger WILL NOT come with a pot as it will be shipped bare root.

Depending on the species and season, you will receive a very similar plant to the one in the picture. It may or may not be blooming at the time of your purchase.

We ship via USPS Priority Mail, If you don't get Free Shipping, then we calculate the shipping cost based on the weight and volume of your purchase.

Care instructions are included in every package you order. Please allow us up to 3 business days to process your order. Depending on your location, we will ship the plants on a certain day to avoid transit time during weekends or holidays. If you wish to receive your order on a specific date, or have special instructions, please add a note on your order. If you have any questions or comments, please feel free to contact us at any time.

  • Description
  • Key Plant Features

Introducing the Carrion plant; also known as Stapelia gigantea, that belongs to the Stapelia genus. Hailing all the way from South Africa, the Stapelia gigantea is known for having the largest flowers of almost any succulent in the world.

The Stapelia gigantea has several other common names, such as carrion flowers, starfish plant, starfish flower, toad plant, and zulu giant plant. The term "carrion" is specifically used to describe the decaying flesh of dead animals. It is derived from the Latin word "caro," meaning flesh. This Stapelia gigantea gets its common name because of its flowers, which emit a strong odor and resemble the smell of rotting meat.  

Stapelia gigantea is a spineless stem succulent that resembles a cactus; can grow up to 2 feet tall and may form big clumps when growing up to 3 feet wide. These thick, fleshy stems are ribbed and have a green coloration, with some variations in shades. 

The Carrion has Huge Flowers 


The flowers of the Stapelia gigantea are large, about 15 inches, and star-shaped; they bloom during the fall.

They have pale yellow to reddish brown hues adorned with intricate patterns and markings. The petals are thick and fleshy, and they curve backward, giving the flowers a star-like appearance.

The carrion flowers smell like rotten flesh; although this sounds disgusting, it helps attract flies and other pollinators to the Stapelia gigantea.

Interestingly, it also looks like drying flesh pealing from the bone and also fringes of soft white hairs on the corolla segments superficially resembling a layer of mold growing on rotting matter.  

The cluster of flowers arises near the base of a branch; on this carrion plant, the inflorescence had two buds with scale-like leaves at the base of the petioles.

Despite their unusual smell, the flowers of the Stapelia gigantea can be quite beautiful and captivating. They are a testament to the diversity and uniqueness of nature. If you ever come across these flowers, be sure to take a moment to appreciate their intricate beauty, even if the smell might not be to everyone's liking! 

Watering Needs 

Like other succulents, Stapelia gigantea are adapted to survive in arid conditions, so they have a unique way of storing water in their fleshy stems and leaves.

When it comes to watering your Stapelia gigantea carrion plant, it's best to follow the "soak and dry" method. This means that you should thoroughly water your succulent plant until the water drains out from the bottom of the pot, and then allow the soil to dry out completely before watering again. This helps prevent overwatering and ensures that the roots don't sit in excess moisture, which can lead to root rot. 

In the spring and fall, during the active growing season, you can water the carrion flower plant about once every 2-3 weeks. However, depending on the specific conditions in your environment, you should adjust the frequency. Factors such as temperature, humidity, and the type of soil mixed can affect the watering needs of the plant.

In the winter during the dormant period, when your Stapelia gigantea plant is not actively growing, you should reduce watering even further. It's best to allow the soil to dry out completely between watering and water sparingly, only when it shows signs of thirst, such as wrinkled stems or leaves. 

Remember, it's always better to underwater than to overwater the carrion plant. If in doubt, it's safer to wait for the soil to dry out before watering again. This will help prevent any potential issues related to overwatering and promote the overall health of your carrion plant. 

Light Requirements

When it comes to growing your Stapelia gigantea indoors, it thrives in bright, indirect light. Place it near a window where it can receive bright, filtered sunlight for 4-6 hours a day. Avoid placing it in direct sunlight, as the intense rays can scorch the leaves and cause damage to the carrion plant. If you notice that the stems are stretching or leaning toward the light source, it's a sign that it needs more light. In that case, you can consider supplementing with artificial grow lights to provide the necessary brightness. 

If you decide to grow the Stapelia gigantea outdoors, it works best in partial sun or light shade. It can tolerate some direct sunlight, especially during the morning or late afternoon, but it's best to avoid the scorching midday sun. A location with dappled sunlight or a spot under a tree that provides filtered light can be ideal for the carrion plant. Just make sure it still gets enough brightness to thrive. 

Remember, finding the right balance of light is crucial for the health of the Stapelia gigantea. Too much direct sunlight can cause sunburn and damage the plant, while insufficient light can lead to weak growth and poor blooming. Observing your Stapelia's response to light and making adjustments accordingly will help ensure its well-being. 

Optimal Soil & Fertilizer Needs

When it comes to the soil requirements for your Stapelia gigantea plant, it prefers a well-draining soil mix. You can create a suitable blend by combining equal parts of potting soil, perlite, and coarse sand. This mixture allows excess water to drain away efficiently, preventing the roots from sitting in soggy soil, which can lead to root rot. Remember to choose a pot with drainage holes to further aid in proper drainage. Instead, make or buy a well-draining potting mix, or ideally, use our specialized succulent potting mix that contains 5 natural substrates and mycorrhizae to promote the development of a strong root system that helps your succulent to thrive. 

The Stapelia gigantea carrion plant doesn't require frequent fertilization, but it can benefit from light feeding during the growing season. Fertilize once a year during the growing season in the spring with a balanced fertilizer diluted to ½ the strength recommended on the label.   Dilute the fertilizer according to the instructions and apply it to the soil once a year in the spring. Be cautious not to over-fertilize, as this can result in excessive growth with fewer blooms. This provides a slow-release source of nutrients and helps improve the overall soil structure. 

Remember, it's important to monitor your Stapelia gigantea response to fertilization and adjust accordingly. If you notice any signs of nutrient deficiencies or excessive growth, you can make adjustments to the fertilizer regimen. 

Hardiness Zone & More 

The Stapelia gigantea is native to warm, tropical regions, so it thrives in indoor environments where temperatures are consistently between 60°F to 80°F. It prefers bright, indirect light, so placing it near a window with filtered sunlight works well. In terms of humidity, this plant can tolerate average indoor humidity levels, but it appreciates a slightly higher humidity level. You can increase humidity by placing a tray of water near the plant or by using a humidifier. 

In regions where the climate is warm and frost-free, you can also grow the Stapelia gigantea outdoors. It is suitable for USDA zones 10 to 12 and needs a cool, dry rest period in winter but keeps above 30°F and avoids any frost. It can tolerate higher temperatures, but it's essential to provide some protection from the intense midday sun, especially in hotter climates. In terms of humidity, the Stapelia gigantea can handle a range of humidity levels, but it appreciates moderate to high humidity. 

Remember to acclimate your Stapelia gigantea gradually when transitioning it from indoor to outdoor or vice versa. Sudden changes in temperature or light can stress your carrion plant. Take care to protect the plant from extreme weather conditions like frost or excessive heat. 

Additionally, Stapelia gigantea propagation by stem cuttings is a common method used by gardeners and plant enthusiasts. With proper care and attention, the stem cuttings will develop roots and grow into new Carrion plants.  

The Bottom Line 

Overall, the Stapelia gigantea (Carrion plant) is unique and captivating, with its large, star-shaped flowers that have distinctive carrion-like scent, hence known as carrion flowers. It is a low-maintenance succulent plant that thrives in bright, indirect light and well-draining soil. The Stapelia gigantea is also known for its ability to attract pollinators like flies, making it a great addition to any garden or indoor collection.

So, if you're looking for a striking and low-maintenance succulent for your rock gardens, the Carrion Plant Stapelia gigantea is definitely worth considering! 

Bloom Season Fall
Botanical Name Stapelia gigantea
Common Name Carrion plant, Carrion flower
Dormancy Winter
Family Apocynaceae
Flower Color Pale yellow, reddish brown
Genus Stapelia
Growth Habit Shrubby, spineless
Growth Rate Fast
Hardiness Zone 10, 11, 12
Mature Size 2 ft. tall, 3 ft. wide
Native Area South Africa
Plant Type Succulent
Propagation By stem cuttings
Resistance Drought tolerant, heat resistance
Soil PH 6.5, Acidic, Neutral
Soil Type specialized succulent potting mix
Special Features Largest flowers
Sun Exposure Full sun, partial shade
Toxicity Mildly toxic for humanss, mildly toxic for pets
Watering Needs Low

Pests & Common Problems of the Stapelia gigantea

The Stapelia gigantea carrion flower plant is a resilient succulent, but it can still face a few common problems and pests. The most common are:

Mealybugs: These small, white, cotton-like insects can infest your carrion plant and cause damage. You can remove them by gently wiping them off with a cotton swab dipped in rubbing alcohol.

Scale insects: These pests appear as small, brown, or black bumps on the stems of the Stapelia gigantea plant. They can be removed by gently scraping them off with a soft brush or cloth.

Root rot: Overwatering or poor drainage can lead to root rot in the Stapelia gigantea. To prevent this, make sure the soil is well-drained and allow it to dry out between waterings.

Fungal diseases: Excessive moisture or high humidity can create conditions for fungal diseases like powdery mildew or black spots. To prevent these, avoid overwatering and ensure good air circulation around the Stapelia gigantea.

Lack of blooms: If your Stapelia gigantea is not blooming, it may be due to insufficient light or improper care. Make sure the plant is getting enough bright, indirect light and provide it with the right conditions for growth.

Remember, prevention is key when it comes to pests and problems. Regularly inspect your plant for any signs of pests or diseases and provide it with the proper care to keep it healthy and thriving. 

FAQs of Stapelia gigantea

What does Stapelia gigantea smell like? 

The Stapelia gigantea carrion flowers have a leathery texture that mimics the rotting flesh of a dead animal (like meat and fat rotting in the hot sun). This distinctive smell is actually what attracts flies and other pollinators to the flowers.  

They remember drying flesh peeling back from the bone and also fringes of soft white hairs on the corolla segments superficially resembling a layer of mold growing on rotting matter. The Stapelia gigantea is a carrion plant, and the foul odor helps it attract flies, which then aid in the pollination process. 

Is the carrion plant a cactus? 

No, the carrion plant, also known as the Stapelia gigantea, is not a cactus. It is a succulent plant. While cacti are a type of succulent, not all succulents are cacti. The carrion plant belongs to the genus Stapelia and has its own unique characteristics and growth habits. 

What is Stapelia gigantea used for in medicine? 

The Stapelia gigantea (Carrion flower or carrion plant) has been used in traditional medicine for its potential medicinal properties. Some traditional healers believe that it may have antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory, and analgesic properties.  

However, it's important to note that scientific research on the medicinal uses of Stapelia gigantea is limited, and more studies are needed to validate its potential benefits. As always, it's best to consult with a healthcare professional before using any plant for medicinal purposes. 

Is Stapelia gigantea toxic? 

Yes, the Stapelia gigantea is considered to be mildly toxic for humans and pets. The carrion plant contains compounds that can cause gastrointestinal discomfort if consumed. It's important to keep it out of the reach of children and pets to avoid any potential issues. If accidental ingestion occurs, it's best to seek medical advice immediately. Safety should always be a priority when dealing with plants, especially if there are any concerns about toxicity.   

Why is my Stapelia gigantea turning black? 

Stapelia gigantea may turn black due to rot, fungal infection, overwatering, or poor drainage. It may also be a natural part of the plant's lifecycle, as some species develop darkened areas as they mature. If blackening is accompanied by wilting or distress, it's best to closely examine your carrion plant and adjust its care. 

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