Cascalote Tree &
Cascalote Tree &
Cascalote Tree &
Cascalote Tree &
Cascalote Tree &
Cascalote Tree &
Cascalote Tree &
Cascalote Tree &
Cascalote Tree &
Cascalote Tree &
Cascalote Tree &

Are you looking for a splash of color in your garden year-round? Look no further than the Cascalote tree, also known as 'Caesalpinia cacalaco' and Tara cacalaco! With over 70 species in the Caesalpinia genus, Caesalpinia cacalaco is well suited for southwest desert landscapes.  This evergreen small tree or shrub is native to tropical Mexico and boasts medium green leaves with alternate, bipinnate (compound leaves that grow opposite) arrangements.  

Plus, impress your friends by letting them know it was named after Andreas Caesalpinia - chief physician to Pope Clement VII! The name "cascalote" may come from the Nahuatl word "cascallotl," which means "hard shell. Cascalote" is a Spanish word that refers to the Caesalpinia cacalaco plant, also known as the Mexican or yellow bird of paradise. 

But don't be fooled by its beauty - the cascalote stems are usually thorny, similar to those of a pesky rose bush. And if thorns aren't your thing, fear not! It also has a cultivated variety called 'Smoothie' that has been bred for urban use and doesn't come with all those pesky thorns. However, these thorns are well worth it when you see the striking burst of bright yellow color that this plant produces in winter and spring! 

 In warm climates, this little guy stays evergreen with glossy green compound leaves that will elevate any landscape. The Caesalpinia cacalaco can grow up to 20 feet tall and 15 feet wide when mature, although it typically grows to be around 10-15 feet tall and wide.  

This large woody shrub can even be trained into a small patio tree.  Its seasonal pruning allows you to keep this beauty in its shrub form if you'd prefer. Additionally, Gallic and tannic acids, which are essential to the Mexican tannery industry, are abundant in cascalote.  

Watering Needs 

Like many other succulents, the cascalote requires moderate watering, which means that you should water it enough to keep the soil moist, but not too much that the soil becomes waterlogged. Overwatering the plant can lead to root rot and other problems. It's important to allow the soil to dry out slightly between waterings, as this will help prevent issues with fungal diseases.  

During the plant's active growing season in spring and summer, it may require more frequent watering (3-4 weeks), while in the winter dormant season, it may require less water (2-3 weeks). By monitoring the plant closely and adjusting your watering schedule as needed, you can help ensure that it stays healthy and thrives. 

Light Requirements 

The cascalote tree requires a lot of sunlight to grow properly, which means that it needs to be placed in a location where it can receive at least six hours of direct sunlight each day. If you're growing the plant indoors, it's important to place it near a sunny window or under a grow light to ensure it's getting enough light.  

If you're growing the plant outdoors, make sure it's in a location that receives plenty of sunlight but is also protected from strong winds and extreme temperatures. This will help ensure that the plant stays healthy and can grow to its full potential. 

Low light can negatively affect Caesalpinia cacalaco growth and health, as it needs a lot of sunlight to grow properly. If the plant is not getting enough light, it may become leggy, meaning that it will grow tall and thin with fewer leaves and flowers. Additionally, the plant may not flower as well or may not flower at all if it's not getting enough light.  

Optimal Soil & Fertilizer Needs 

The cascalote likes very airy, porous, nutrient-rich soil with a pH of 5.6- 6.5. These succulents require fast-draining soil that dries completely between waterings. Your soil must have a sandy texture and a low water-holding capacity, just like desert soil.  Soggy wet soil can damage your succulent and contributes to bacterial and fungal rot. Ideally, you want to use our specialized succulent potting mix that contains over 10 natural substrates and organic mycorrhizae to promote the development of a strong root system that helps your succulent to thrive. 

And let's not forget about fertilizing! Your succulent only needs a tiny bit applied once a year in springtime with a natural fertilizer that has lower doses of NPK (5-10-5). No harsh chemicals here, folks - just pure, natural goodness that lasts longer and encourages nutrient absorption, so your succulent stays happy as a clam.  

So, go ahead and give your little guy some love with some awesomely balanced fertilizer because when it comes to soil and fertilizers, we know what works best! 

Hardiness Zones & More 

The cascalote requires sunny, warm climates to thrive, but they can withstand mild cold temperatures. Generally, these are hardy plants that can be grown in the garden in the USDA zone 8-11 and it is an excellent houseplant for beginners because it won't suffer if you neglect to water it for a while. 

If you live in a colder climate, you may need to protect the plant from frost or bring it indoors during the winter months. Additionally, it's important to make sure the succulent is in a location that is protected from strong winds, as this can also damage the Caesalpinia.  

If you're unsure what hardiness zone you're in, you can check with your local nursery or garden center, or look up your location on the USDA Plant Hardiness Zone Map. A cascalote tree succulent tends to live for many years and grows slowly. Plant them in the spring after the weather warms up. 

We think you will love this plant – order your very own Caesalpinia cacalaco - Cascalote tree today and start enjoying its beauty in no time! 

Bloom Season Spring, winter
Botanical Name Caesalpinia cacalaco
Common Name Cascalote Tree, Cascalote
Dormancy Winter
Family Fabaceae
Flower Color Yellow
Genus Caesalpinia
Growth Habit Spreading
Growth Rate Moderate
Hardiness Zone 8, 9, 10, 11
Mature Size 15 ft. tall, 15 ft. wide
Native Area Mexico
Plant Type Shrub, succulent
Propagation By seeds, cuttings
Resistance Drought tolerant, heat resistant, mild frost tolerant, pest resistant
Soil PH 6.5, Acidic, Neutral
Soil Type specialized succulent potting mix
Special Features Fern like foliage, showy flowers
Sun Exposure Full sun, partial shade
Toxicity Toxic for humans, toxic for pets (Keeps away from children)
Watering Needs Moderate

Pests & Common Problems of the Cascalote

The cascalote tree is typically a hardy, low-maintenance tree, but it is still susceptible to some pests and problems. 

The most common problems are: 

Yellowing of leaves: A common sign of root rot is the yellowing of leaves, which eventually drop off. These are also signs of a plant that doesn't get enough sunlight. The leaves will be yellow if your soil has been dry, especially in the winter. For a few days, leave the plant outside in the sun for about six hours each day, and it will heal. 

Pests attack: To prevent these pests from infesting the cascalote, it is important to keep the plant in a clean environment and avoid overwatering, as this can create a humid environment that is conducive to pest infestations. If pests are present, they can be treated with insecticidal soap or neem oil, which are effective at killing pests without harming the plant.  

Curling Leaves:  Evaluate your plant's growing situation closely to determine the cause of curling leaves, such as overwatering, underwatering, or temperature shock. Increase watering to prevent future curling, repot with fresh soil, and avoid major temperature changes. 

FAQs – Cascalote Post

How big does cascalote get? 

The Caesalpinia cacalaco can grow up to 20 feet tall and 15 feet wide when mature, although it typically grows to be around 10-15 feet tall and wide. The plant can be pruned to maintain a smaller size if desired, but it's important to prune it properly to avoid damaging the plant.  

If you're growing the plant in a smaller space, you may want to consider planting a dwarf variety or choosing a different plant that is more suitable for your space. 

What is the meaning of Cascalote? 

"Cascalote" is a Spanish word that refers to the Caesalpinia cacalaco plant, which is also known as the Mexican bird of paradise or yellow bird of paradise. The name "cascalote" may come from the Nahuatl word "cascallotl," which means "hard shell," possibly referring to the tough, woody bark of the plant. 

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Cascalote Tree 'Caesalpinia cacalaco'

sku: 2247

Regular price$ 16.97
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Shipping calculated at checkout.

Size

Please note: All Landscape Ready plants that are in a 6-inch pot or larger WILL NOT come with a pot as it will be shipped bare root.

  • In stock, ready to ship
  • Inventory on the way

Please note: Our large plants are many years old, and as a result, they might have minor scaring but will arrive 100% healthy and looking great.

Please note: Our large plants are shipped bare root. They are also many years old, and as a result, they might have minor scaring but will arrive healthy and looking great.

sku:
Detailed description of this plant is below...

If you live in a cold climate and are expecting temperatures below 40 degrees within the next five days after placing your order, we highly recommend adding a heat pack to your order. If you do not order a heat pack, we do not send one with your order.

BUY HEAT PACKS HERE

**FREE HEAT PACK WITH ORDERS OVER $50 before taxes and shipping- BY REQUEST ONLY, PLEASE MAKE A NOTE ON YOUR ORDER.

To prevent plants from freezing while in transit, orders placed for areas with extreme severe freezing temperatures will be held for shipment until it is safe to ship.

Plants that are in 3.5" pots and smaller will be shipped in its pot to prevent any damage to the roots. Any plant that is 6" and larger WILL NOT come with a pot as it will be shipped bare root.

Depending on the species and season, you will receive a very similar plant to the one in the picture. It may or may not be blooming at the time of your purchase.

We ship via USPS Priority Mail, and we calculate the shipping cost based on the weight and volume of your purchase. Care instructions are included in every package you order. Please allow us up to 3 business days to process your order. Depending on your location, we will ship the plants on a certain day to avoid transit time during weekends or holidays. If you wish to receive your order on a specific date, or have special instructions, please add a note on your order. If you have any questions or comments, please feel free to contact us at any time.

  • Description
  • Key Plant Features

Are you looking for a splash of color in your garden year-round? Look no further than the Cascalote tree, also known as 'Caesalpinia cacalaco' and Tara cacalaco! With over 70 species in the Caesalpinia genus, Caesalpinia cacalaco is well suited for southwest desert landscapes.  This evergreen small tree or shrub is native to tropical Mexico and boasts medium green leaves with alternate, bipinnate (compound leaves that grow opposite) arrangements.  

Plus, impress your friends by letting them know it was named after Andreas Caesalpinia - chief physician to Pope Clement VII! The name "cascalote" may come from the Nahuatl word "cascallotl," which means "hard shell. Cascalote" is a Spanish word that refers to the Caesalpinia cacalaco plant, also known as the Mexican or yellow bird of paradise. 

But don't be fooled by its beauty - the cascalote stems are usually thorny, similar to those of a pesky rose bush. And if thorns aren't your thing, fear not! It also has a cultivated variety called 'Smoothie' that has been bred for urban use and doesn't come with all those pesky thorns. However, these thorns are well worth it when you see the striking burst of bright yellow color that this plant produces in winter and spring! 

 In warm climates, this little guy stays evergreen with glossy green compound leaves that will elevate any landscape. The Caesalpinia cacalaco can grow up to 20 feet tall and 15 feet wide when mature, although it typically grows to be around 10-15 feet tall and wide.  

This large woody shrub can even be trained into a small patio tree.  Its seasonal pruning allows you to keep this beauty in its shrub form if you'd prefer. Additionally, Gallic and tannic acids, which are essential to the Mexican tannery industry, are abundant in cascalote.  

Watering Needs 

Like many other succulents, the cascalote requires moderate watering, which means that you should water it enough to keep the soil moist, but not too much that the soil becomes waterlogged. Overwatering the plant can lead to root rot and other problems. It's important to allow the soil to dry out slightly between waterings, as this will help prevent issues with fungal diseases.  

During the plant's active growing season in spring and summer, it may require more frequent watering (3-4 weeks), while in the winter dormant season, it may require less water (2-3 weeks). By monitoring the plant closely and adjusting your watering schedule as needed, you can help ensure that it stays healthy and thrives. 

Light Requirements 

The cascalote tree requires a lot of sunlight to grow properly, which means that it needs to be placed in a location where it can receive at least six hours of direct sunlight each day. If you're growing the plant indoors, it's important to place it near a sunny window or under a grow light to ensure it's getting enough light.  

If you're growing the plant outdoors, make sure it's in a location that receives plenty of sunlight but is also protected from strong winds and extreme temperatures. This will help ensure that the plant stays healthy and can grow to its full potential. 

Low light can negatively affect Caesalpinia cacalaco growth and health, as it needs a lot of sunlight to grow properly. If the plant is not getting enough light, it may become leggy, meaning that it will grow tall and thin with fewer leaves and flowers. Additionally, the plant may not flower as well or may not flower at all if it's not getting enough light.  

Optimal Soil & Fertilizer Needs 

The cascalote likes very airy, porous, nutrient-rich soil with a pH of 5.6- 6.5. These succulents require fast-draining soil that dries completely between waterings. Your soil must have a sandy texture and a low water-holding capacity, just like desert soil.  Soggy wet soil can damage your succulent and contributes to bacterial and fungal rot. Ideally, you want to use our specialized succulent potting mix that contains over 10 natural substrates and organic mycorrhizae to promote the development of a strong root system that helps your succulent to thrive. 

And let's not forget about fertilizing! Your succulent only needs a tiny bit applied once a year in springtime with a natural fertilizer that has lower doses of NPK (5-10-5). No harsh chemicals here, folks - just pure, natural goodness that lasts longer and encourages nutrient absorption, so your succulent stays happy as a clam.  

So, go ahead and give your little guy some love with some awesomely balanced fertilizer because when it comes to soil and fertilizers, we know what works best! 

Hardiness Zones & More 

The cascalote requires sunny, warm climates to thrive, but they can withstand mild cold temperatures. Generally, these are hardy plants that can be grown in the garden in the USDA zone 8-11 and it is an excellent houseplant for beginners because it won't suffer if you neglect to water it for a while. 

If you live in a colder climate, you may need to protect the plant from frost or bring it indoors during the winter months. Additionally, it's important to make sure the succulent is in a location that is protected from strong winds, as this can also damage the Caesalpinia.  

If you're unsure what hardiness zone you're in, you can check with your local nursery or garden center, or look up your location on the USDA Plant Hardiness Zone Map. A cascalote tree succulent tends to live for many years and grows slowly. Plant them in the spring after the weather warms up. 

We think you will love this plant – order your very own Caesalpinia cacalaco - Cascalote tree today and start enjoying its beauty in no time! 

Bloom Season Spring, winter
Botanical Name Caesalpinia cacalaco
Common Name Cascalote Tree, Cascalote
Dormancy Winter
Family Fabaceae
Flower Color Yellow
Genus Caesalpinia
Growth Habit Spreading
Growth Rate Moderate
Hardiness Zone 8, 9, 10, 11
Mature Size 15 ft. tall, 15 ft. wide
Native Area Mexico
Plant Type Shrub, succulent
Propagation By seeds, cuttings
Resistance Drought tolerant, heat resistant, mild frost tolerant, pest resistant
Soil PH 6.5, Acidic, Neutral
Soil Type specialized succulent potting mix
Special Features Fern like foliage, showy flowers
Sun Exposure Full sun, partial shade
Toxicity Toxic for humans, toxic for pets (Keeps away from children)
Watering Needs Moderate

Pests & Common Problems of the Cascalote

The cascalote tree is typically a hardy, low-maintenance tree, but it is still susceptible to some pests and problems. 

The most common problems are: 

Yellowing of leaves: A common sign of root rot is the yellowing of leaves, which eventually drop off. These are also signs of a plant that doesn't get enough sunlight. The leaves will be yellow if your soil has been dry, especially in the winter. For a few days, leave the plant outside in the sun for about six hours each day, and it will heal. 

Pests attack: To prevent these pests from infesting the cascalote, it is important to keep the plant in a clean environment and avoid overwatering, as this can create a humid environment that is conducive to pest infestations. If pests are present, they can be treated with insecticidal soap or neem oil, which are effective at killing pests without harming the plant.  

Curling Leaves:  Evaluate your plant's growing situation closely to determine the cause of curling leaves, such as overwatering, underwatering, or temperature shock. Increase watering to prevent future curling, repot with fresh soil, and avoid major temperature changes. 

FAQs – Cascalote Post

How big does cascalote get? 

The Caesalpinia cacalaco can grow up to 20 feet tall and 15 feet wide when mature, although it typically grows to be around 10-15 feet tall and wide. The plant can be pruned to maintain a smaller size if desired, but it's important to prune it properly to avoid damaging the plant.  

If you're growing the plant in a smaller space, you may want to consider planting a dwarf variety or choosing a different plant that is more suitable for your space. 

What is the meaning of Cascalote? 

"Cascalote" is a Spanish word that refers to the Caesalpinia cacalaco plant, which is also known as the Mexican bird of paradise or yellow bird of paradise. The name "cascalote" may come from the Nahuatl word "cascallotl," which means "hard shell," possibly referring to the tough, woody bark of the plant. 

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