Century Plant - Agave Americana
Century Plant - Agave Americana
Century Plant - Agave Americana
Century Plant - Agave Americana
Century Plant - Agave Americana
Century Plant - Agave Americana
Century Plant - Agave Americana
Century Plant - Agave Americana
Century Plant - Agave Americana
Century Plant - Agave Americana
Century Plant - Agave Americana
Century Plant - Agave Americana
Century Plant - Agave Americana
Century Plant - Agave Americana
Century Plant - Agave Americana
Century Plant - Agave Americana
Century Plant - Agave Americana
Century Plant - Agave Americana
Century Plant - Agave Americana
Century Plant - Agave Americana
Century Plant - Agave Americana
Century Plant - Agave Americana
Century Plant - Agave Americana
Century Plant - Agave Americana
Century Plant - Agave Americana
Century Plant - Agave Americana
Century Plant - Agave Americana
Century Plant - Agave Americana
Century Plant - Agave Americana
Century Plant - Agave Americana
Century Plant - Agave Americana
Century Plant - Agave Americana
Century Plant - Agave Americana
Century Plant - Agave Americana
Century Plant - Agave Americana
Century Plant - Agave Americana

Introducing the Century Plant, also known as Agave Americana, which is a stunning succulent that belongs to the family Asparagaceae. Native to Mexico and the Southwestern United States, the Agave americana has several other common names, including American aloe, maguey, flowering aloe, spiked aloe, blue agave, and Mexican soap plant. 


Century plant agaves have large, thick, and fleshy leaves that form a rosette shape.

The leaves of these American agave plants are a beautiful blue-green color and have sharp, spiky edges, which can be quite formidable.

The Agave americana itself can grow to be quite large, with mature specimens reaching up to 6 feet tall and 8–12 feet wide.

Century plants, with their tall, spiky leaves, are a stunning addition to any rock garden or landscaping, creating a striking focal point. 

When it comes to Century Plant blooming, it is truly a sight to behold. The Agave americana is a monocarpic plant, meaning century plant flowers only bloom once in their lifetime, typically after 10 to 30 years. The century plant flower stalk can shoot up to an impressive height of 20–40 feet.

The flowers themselves are yellow-green in color and are arranged in a dense cluster at the top of the stalk. This magnificent display of Agave americana blooming attracts pollinators like bees and hummingbirds.

Interestingly, the Agave  Americana is the only plant out of the family that is known to produce more than 20 gallons of nectar every week!

Agave americana can be propagated by using the offsets, or "pups," that grow around the base of the mature plant. These can be carefully separated and replanted to establish new agave-century plants. These American-century plants can be propagated through seeds, although this method requires more time and patience. 

Watering Needs 

Native to arid environments, the Century plant Agave americana requires very little watering. This agave stores water in its leaves so that it can survive during droughts or famines. To prevent root rot, allow the soil to completely dry between waterings. Overwatering can be detrimental to your Agave americana health. 

In the spring and summer, during the growing season, you can water the Century Plant once every 2-4 weeks. However, in cooler months or during winter, when your Agave americana century plant is in its dormant phase, you should reduce watering to once every 4-6 weeks or even less. The century plant's water needs decreased during this time. 

It's always a good idea to observe the ground level of your century plant and adjust the watering frequency based on its specific needs. By inserting your finger approximately an inch into the earth, you can determine the moisture level. If the soil seems dry, it's time to water it. If it's still moist, wait a little longer before watering. 

Remember, the century plant is well-suited to dry conditions and can tolerate drought. It's better to underwater than to overwater your succulent plants. With proper watering and care, your Agave Americana will thrive and add a touch of desert beauty to your space! 

Light Requirements

When growing the Century Plant indoors, it's crucial to provide it with bright, indirect light. Place your Agave Americana near a south-facing window or any spot that receives ample sunlight throughout the day. If direct sunlight is too intense, you can use sheer curtains or blinds to filter the light. The Agave americana should receive at least 6–8 hours of bright light daily to thrive indoors. 

Agave americana is well-suited for outdoor cultivation, especially in warm and arid regions. It thrives in full sun exposure, so choose a location in your garden that receives direct sunlight for most of the day. This plant can tolerate high temperatures and intense sunlight, making it an excellent choice for xeriscaping or desert landscapes. Just ensure that the soil has good drainage to prevent waterlogging. 

Remember, the Century Plant is a hardy succulent that can adapt to a variety of light conditions. Whether indoors or outdoors, make sure to monitor the succulent response to the light and adjust accordingly to ensure its well-being. 

Optimal Soil & Fertilizer Needs 

The Agave americana century plant prefers sandy, well-drained soil, as excess moisture can promote root and stem rot. Planet Desert specializes in succulents and has specialized succulent potting soil that includes an organic substrate with mycorrhizae to help with the growth of a healthy root system to help your Agave century plants thrive.

As an okay alternative, you can create your own potting mix by combining equal portions of perlite, coarse sand, and good-quality natural potting soil. 

The Agave americana is a low-maintenance plant that doesn't require frequent fertilization. In fact, it can thrive in nutrient-poor soils. During the growing season in the spring, you can apply a balanced (5-10-5), slow-release NPK fertilizer once a year. While the Century Plant doesn't require rich soil, you can enhance its growth by incorporating some organic matter into the soil.

Adding compost or well-rotted manure to the planting hole or top-dressing the soil with a thin layer of organic matter can provide some additional nutrients and improve soil structure. 

Hardiness Zone & More 

When it comes to indoor growing, the Century Plant Agave Americana prefers a warm environment with temperatures between 65°F and 85°F. This century plant is quite adaptable and can tolerate slightly cooler temperatures during the winter months, but it's best to keep it away from drafts and cold windows.

As for humidity, the Century Plant can handle average indoor humidity levels, but it prefers drier conditions, similar to the arid regions in which it naturally grows. So, it's important not to overwater the plant and to ensure proper drainage to prevent root rot. 

For outdoor cultivation, this plant is suitable in USDA zones 8–11. It thrives in full sun and can tolerate a wide range of temperatures, from hot and dry summers to cooler winter temperatures. In USDA Zone 8, it's important to protect your century plant from extreme cold temperatures by providing some winter protection, such as covering it with a frost cloth during freezing weather. 

When it comes to humidity, the Century Plant is well-suited to arid and semi-arid climates. It can tolerate low humidity levels and is relatively drought-tolerant once established. However, it's important to note that excessive humidity can lead to fungal diseases, so it's best to provide good air circulation and avoid overwatering new plants. 

Final Thoughts 

Overall, the Century Plant (Agave Americana), is a remarkable succulent that captivates with its striking features. With its large, fleshy leaves forming a rosette shape and its beautiful blue-green color, it's a true showstopper. The century plant can grow to impressive sizes and is often referred to by various common names, including American aloe and maguey. The Agave americana plant is known for its unique flowering habit, blooming only once in its lifetime with a towering flower stalk that attracts pollinators. It can be propagated through offsets or seeds, but caution should be exercised due to its toxic nature. Overall, Agave americana is a stunning plant that adds unique beauty and intrigue to any garden or landscape.  

Additionally, the Agave Americana variegata or variegated century plant, and the White Stripe Century Plant (Agave Americana 'Mediopicta Alba') are popular other types of century plants with unique green and yellow/white leaves, making them attractive to gardeners and enthusiasts.  

Bloom Season Once in a lifetime
Botanical Name Agave americana
Common Name Century plant, American Aloe, American Agave
Dormancy Winter
Family Asparagaceae
Flower Color Greenish yellow
Genus Agave
Growth Habit Rosette
Growth Rate Slow
Hardiness Zone 8, 9, 10, 11
Mature Size 6 ft. tall, 12 ft. wide
Native Area Mexico
Plant Type Perennial succulent
Propagation By offsets, seeds
Resistance Drought tolerant, pest resistance, heat tolerant
Soil PH 6.5, Acidic, Neutral
Soil Type specialized succulent potting soil
Special Features Esy to grow
Sun Exposure Full sun, partial shade
Toxicity Mild toxic to humans, mildly toxic for pets
Watering Needs Low

Pests & Common Problems of Century Plant

The Century Plant, also known as Agave americana, is generally a hardy and low-maintenance plant. However, it can still face a few common problems and pests. Here are the most common: 

Mealybugs: These small, white, cotton-like insects can infest the leaves and stems of Agave Americana. They suck sap from the century plant, causing yellowing, wilting, and stunted growth. To combat mealybugs, you can use insecticidal soap or wipe them off with a cotton swab dipped in rubbing alcohol. 

Agave Snout Weevil: This pesky beetle can be a problem for Agave Americana. The adult weevils lay their eggs in the plant's leaves, and the larvae feed on the leaf tip's inner tissue, causing damage and eventually killing the century plant. Prevention is key, so regularly inspect your Americana agave for signs of weevil activity and remove any affected leaves or century plants. 

Root Rot: Agave Americana is susceptible to root rot if the soil remains consistently wet. Overwatering or poor drainage can lead to this fungal disease, causing the roots to rot and the century plant to decline. To prevent root rot, make sure to use well-draining soil and water the plant sparingly, allowing the soil to dry out between waterings. 

Leaf Spots: Agave Americana can develop leaf spots, which are usually caused by fungal infections. These spots appear as discolored, brown, or black lesions on the leaves. To prevent leaf spots, avoid overhead watering and provide good air circulation around the century plant. If leaf spots occur, remove the affected leaves and treat them with fungicide if necessary. 

Remember, with the proper Agave Americana care, addressing any pest or problem promptly will help ensure its health and vitality. 

Frequently
Asked Questions

  • Is century plant an aloe?

    Despite the name 'American Aloe', the century plant does not belong to the family of aloe! The Century Plant belongs to the family of Agavaceae and the flower stalks may reach a height of 40 feet. Agave americana is a very attractive garden plant but it does take about 8-30 years to mature and reach its maximum height.

  • How fast do century plants grow?

    The Century Plant, Agave Americana, has a slow growth rate, taking 8 to 30 years to reach maturity and produce a flower stalk. It forms a rosette of thick, spiky leaves that can grow up to 6 feet long. Eventually, it shoots up a towering flower stalk that can reach heights of 20 to 40 feet. This remarkable growth spurt occurs in the plant's final year, as it puts all its energy into producing flowers and seeds before dying. Despite its slow growth, its final stage is truly awe-inspiring.

  • Does a century plant bloom only once in its lifetime?

    The Century Plant blooms once in its lifetime, reaching maturity after 8-30 years of slow growth. It produces a magnificent flower stalk that can reach 20 to 40 feet, a remarkable event as the plant puts all its energy into producing flowers and seeds. After blooming, the plant dies, leaving offspring in the form of seeds or offsets. Witnessing the Century Plant in full bloom is a unique and memorable addition to any garden or landscape.

  • Is Agave americana the same as Aloe vera?

    No, Agave Americana is not the same as Aloe Vera. While both plants are succulents and share some similarities in their appearance, they belong to different plant families and have distinct characteristics. Agave Americana an accent plant, also known as the Century Plant, has large, spiky leaves arranged in a rosette shape and produces a tall flower stalk once in its lifetime.

    On the other hand, Aloe Vera has long, fleshy leaves with serrated edges and is known for its medicinal properties, particularly the soothing gel found within its leaves. So, while they may look somewhat similar, Agave Americana and Aloe Vera are different plants with their own unique features and uses.

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Century Plant - Agave Americana

sku: 814

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Regular price$ 16.97
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Height: 8"-10"
Diameter: 10"-12"
Height: 13"-16"
Diameter: 16"- 18"
Height: 22"-25"
Diameter: 20"- 25"

Please note: All Landscape Ready plants that are in a 6-inch pot or larger WILL NOT come with a pot as it will be shipped bare root.

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Please note: Our large plants are many years old, and as a result, they might have minor scaring but will arrive 100% healthy and looking great.

Please note: Our large plants are shipped bare root. They are also many years old, and as a result, they might have minor scaring but will arrive healthy and looking great.

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Detailed description of this plant is below...

If you live in a cold climate and are expecting temperatures below 40 degrees within the next five days after placing your order, we highly recommend adding a heat pack to your order. If you do not order a heat pack, we do not send one with your order.

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FREE SHIPPING ON ALL ORDERS OVER $89 in the
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Plants that are in 3.5" pots and smaller will be shipped in its pot to prevent any damage to the roots.

Any plant that is 6" and larger WILL NOT come with a pot as it will be shipped bare root.

Depending on the species and season, you will receive a very similar plant to the one in the picture. It may or may not be blooming at the time of your purchase.

We ship via USPS Priority Mail, If you don't get Free Shipping, then we calculate the shipping cost based on the weight and volume of your purchase.

Care instructions are included in every package you order. Please allow us up to 3 business days to process your order. Depending on your location, we will ship the plants on a certain day to avoid transit time during weekends or holidays. If you wish to receive your order on a specific date, or have special instructions, please add a note on your order. If you have any questions or comments, please feel free to contact us at any time.

  • Description
  • Key Plant Features

Introducing the Century Plant, also known as Agave Americana, which is a stunning succulent that belongs to the family Asparagaceae. Native to Mexico and the Southwestern United States, the Agave americana has several other common names, including American aloe, maguey, flowering aloe, spiked aloe, blue agave, and Mexican soap plant. 


Century plant agaves have large, thick, and fleshy leaves that form a rosette shape.

The leaves of these American agave plants are a beautiful blue-green color and have sharp, spiky edges, which can be quite formidable.

The Agave americana itself can grow to be quite large, with mature specimens reaching up to 6 feet tall and 8–12 feet wide.

Century plants, with their tall, spiky leaves, are a stunning addition to any rock garden or landscaping, creating a striking focal point. 

When it comes to Century Plant blooming, it is truly a sight to behold. The Agave americana is a monocarpic plant, meaning century plant flowers only bloom once in their lifetime, typically after 10 to 30 years. The century plant flower stalk can shoot up to an impressive height of 20–40 feet.

The flowers themselves are yellow-green in color and are arranged in a dense cluster at the top of the stalk. This magnificent display of Agave americana blooming attracts pollinators like bees and hummingbirds.

Interestingly, the Agave  Americana is the only plant out of the family that is known to produce more than 20 gallons of nectar every week!

Agave americana can be propagated by using the offsets, or "pups," that grow around the base of the mature plant. These can be carefully separated and replanted to establish new agave-century plants. These American-century plants can be propagated through seeds, although this method requires more time and patience. 

Watering Needs 

Native to arid environments, the Century plant Agave americana requires very little watering. This agave stores water in its leaves so that it can survive during droughts or famines. To prevent root rot, allow the soil to completely dry between waterings. Overwatering can be detrimental to your Agave americana health. 

In the spring and summer, during the growing season, you can water the Century Plant once every 2-4 weeks. However, in cooler months or during winter, when your Agave americana century plant is in its dormant phase, you should reduce watering to once every 4-6 weeks or even less. The century plant's water needs decreased during this time. 

It's always a good idea to observe the ground level of your century plant and adjust the watering frequency based on its specific needs. By inserting your finger approximately an inch into the earth, you can determine the moisture level. If the soil seems dry, it's time to water it. If it's still moist, wait a little longer before watering. 

Remember, the century plant is well-suited to dry conditions and can tolerate drought. It's better to underwater than to overwater your succulent plants. With proper watering and care, your Agave Americana will thrive and add a touch of desert beauty to your space! 

Light Requirements

When growing the Century Plant indoors, it's crucial to provide it with bright, indirect light. Place your Agave Americana near a south-facing window or any spot that receives ample sunlight throughout the day. If direct sunlight is too intense, you can use sheer curtains or blinds to filter the light. The Agave americana should receive at least 6–8 hours of bright light daily to thrive indoors. 

Agave americana is well-suited for outdoor cultivation, especially in warm and arid regions. It thrives in full sun exposure, so choose a location in your garden that receives direct sunlight for most of the day. This plant can tolerate high temperatures and intense sunlight, making it an excellent choice for xeriscaping or desert landscapes. Just ensure that the soil has good drainage to prevent waterlogging. 

Remember, the Century Plant is a hardy succulent that can adapt to a variety of light conditions. Whether indoors or outdoors, make sure to monitor the succulent response to the light and adjust accordingly to ensure its well-being. 

Optimal Soil & Fertilizer Needs 

The Agave americana century plant prefers sandy, well-drained soil, as excess moisture can promote root and stem rot. Planet Desert specializes in succulents and has specialized succulent potting soil that includes an organic substrate with mycorrhizae to help with the growth of a healthy root system to help your Agave century plants thrive.

As an okay alternative, you can create your own potting mix by combining equal portions of perlite, coarse sand, and good-quality natural potting soil. 

The Agave americana is a low-maintenance plant that doesn't require frequent fertilization. In fact, it can thrive in nutrient-poor soils. During the growing season in the spring, you can apply a balanced (5-10-5), slow-release NPK fertilizer once a year. While the Century Plant doesn't require rich soil, you can enhance its growth by incorporating some organic matter into the soil.

Adding compost or well-rotted manure to the planting hole or top-dressing the soil with a thin layer of organic matter can provide some additional nutrients and improve soil structure. 

Hardiness Zone & More 

When it comes to indoor growing, the Century Plant Agave Americana prefers a warm environment with temperatures between 65°F and 85°F. This century plant is quite adaptable and can tolerate slightly cooler temperatures during the winter months, but it's best to keep it away from drafts and cold windows.

As for humidity, the Century Plant can handle average indoor humidity levels, but it prefers drier conditions, similar to the arid regions in which it naturally grows. So, it's important not to overwater the plant and to ensure proper drainage to prevent root rot. 

For outdoor cultivation, this plant is suitable in USDA zones 8–11. It thrives in full sun and can tolerate a wide range of temperatures, from hot and dry summers to cooler winter temperatures. In USDA Zone 8, it's important to protect your century plant from extreme cold temperatures by providing some winter protection, such as covering it with a frost cloth during freezing weather. 

When it comes to humidity, the Century Plant is well-suited to arid and semi-arid climates. It can tolerate low humidity levels and is relatively drought-tolerant once established. However, it's important to note that excessive humidity can lead to fungal diseases, so it's best to provide good air circulation and avoid overwatering new plants. 

Final Thoughts 

Overall, the Century Plant (Agave Americana), is a remarkable succulent that captivates with its striking features. With its large, fleshy leaves forming a rosette shape and its beautiful blue-green color, it's a true showstopper. The century plant can grow to impressive sizes and is often referred to by various common names, including American aloe and maguey. The Agave americana plant is known for its unique flowering habit, blooming only once in its lifetime with a towering flower stalk that attracts pollinators. It can be propagated through offsets or seeds, but caution should be exercised due to its toxic nature. Overall, Agave americana is a stunning plant that adds unique beauty and intrigue to any garden or landscape.  

Additionally, the Agave Americana variegata or variegated century plant, and the White Stripe Century Plant (Agave Americana 'Mediopicta Alba') are popular other types of century plants with unique green and yellow/white leaves, making them attractive to gardeners and enthusiasts.  

Bloom Season Once in a lifetime
Botanical Name Agave americana
Common Name Century plant, American Aloe, American Agave
Dormancy Winter
Family Asparagaceae
Flower Color Greenish yellow
Genus Agave
Growth Habit Rosette
Growth Rate Slow
Hardiness Zone 8, 9, 10, 11
Mature Size 6 ft. tall, 12 ft. wide
Native Area Mexico
Plant Type Perennial succulent
Propagation By offsets, seeds
Resistance Drought tolerant, pest resistance, heat tolerant
Soil PH 6.5, Acidic, Neutral
Soil Type specialized succulent potting soil
Special Features Esy to grow
Sun Exposure Full sun, partial shade
Toxicity Mild toxic to humans, mildly toxic for pets
Watering Needs Low

Pests & Common Problems of Century Plant

The Century Plant, also known as Agave americana, is generally a hardy and low-maintenance plant. However, it can still face a few common problems and pests. Here are the most common: 

Mealybugs: These small, white, cotton-like insects can infest the leaves and stems of Agave Americana. They suck sap from the century plant, causing yellowing, wilting, and stunted growth. To combat mealybugs, you can use insecticidal soap or wipe them off with a cotton swab dipped in rubbing alcohol. 

Agave Snout Weevil: This pesky beetle can be a problem for Agave Americana. The adult weevils lay their eggs in the plant's leaves, and the larvae feed on the leaf tip's inner tissue, causing damage and eventually killing the century plant. Prevention is key, so regularly inspect your Americana agave for signs of weevil activity and remove any affected leaves or century plants. 

Root Rot: Agave Americana is susceptible to root rot if the soil remains consistently wet. Overwatering or poor drainage can lead to this fungal disease, causing the roots to rot and the century plant to decline. To prevent root rot, make sure to use well-draining soil and water the plant sparingly, allowing the soil to dry out between waterings. 

Leaf Spots: Agave Americana can develop leaf spots, which are usually caused by fungal infections. These spots appear as discolored, brown, or black lesions on the leaves. To prevent leaf spots, avoid overhead watering and provide good air circulation around the century plant. If leaf spots occur, remove the affected leaves and treat them with fungicide if necessary. 

Remember, with the proper Agave Americana care, addressing any pest or problem promptly will help ensure its health and vitality. 

Frequently
Asked Questions

  • Is century plant an aloe?

    Despite the name 'American Aloe', the century plant does not belong to the family of aloe! The Century Plant belongs to the family of Agavaceae and the flower stalks may reach a height of 40 feet. Agave americana is a very attractive garden plant but it does take about 8-30 years to mature and reach its maximum height.

  • How fast do century plants grow?

    The Century Plant, Agave Americana, has a slow growth rate, taking 8 to 30 years to reach maturity and produce a flower stalk. It forms a rosette of thick, spiky leaves that can grow up to 6 feet long. Eventually, it shoots up a towering flower stalk that can reach heights of 20 to 40 feet. This remarkable growth spurt occurs in the plant's final year, as it puts all its energy into producing flowers and seeds before dying. Despite its slow growth, its final stage is truly awe-inspiring.

  • Does a century plant bloom only once in its lifetime?

    The Century Plant blooms once in its lifetime, reaching maturity after 8-30 years of slow growth. It produces a magnificent flower stalk that can reach 20 to 40 feet, a remarkable event as the plant puts all its energy into producing flowers and seeds. After blooming, the plant dies, leaving offspring in the form of seeds or offsets. Witnessing the Century Plant in full bloom is a unique and memorable addition to any garden or landscape.

  • Is Agave americana the same as Aloe vera?

    No, Agave Americana is not the same as Aloe Vera. While both plants are succulents and share some similarities in their appearance, they belong to different plant families and have distinct characteristics. Agave Americana an accent plant, also known as the Century Plant, has large, spiky leaves arranged in a rosette shape and produces a tall flower stalk once in its lifetime.

    On the other hand, Aloe Vera has long, fleshy leaves with serrated edges and is known for its medicinal properties, particularly the soothing gel found within its leaves. So, while they may look somewhat similar, Agave Americana and Aloe Vera are different plants with their own unique features and uses.

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