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Variegated Century Plant - Agave americana &
Variegated Century Plant - Agave americana &
Variegated Century Plant - Agave americana &
Variegated Century Plant - Agave americana &
Variegated Century Plant - Agave americana &
Variegated Century Plant - Agave americana &
Variegated Century Plant - Agave americana &
Variegated Century Plant - Agave americana &
Variegated Century Plant - Agave americana &
Variegated Century Plant - Agave americana &

Introducing the Agave americana 'Variegata or Agave americana 'Marginata', a stunning variety of Agave americana. Agave Americana is commonly referred to as a century plant because it was once believed that it took 100 years for the plant to bloom. However, this is a common misconception.  

The century plant blooms light-green yellow flowers once in its lifetime after it has reached maturity. This can take anywhere from 10 to 30 years, depending on light, temperature, and humidity. Being monocarpic, the mother plant dies after blooming.  

The twisted, silvery-green leaves of this variegated century plant form a large rosette, and the leaf margins have bright yellow stripes that resemble a striped ribbon. Its stiff, rosette-shaped, sword-like leaves grow upright, and the mature plant can reach the height of 6 feet and 10 feet wide. Each leaf has a pointed, spiny tip and is armed with tiny brown hooks. This variegated type will grow a bit smaller than other Agaves Americans but still is bigger than the one with white stripes (non-variegated).  

Native to Mexico, there are numerous variegated forms of Agave americana, each with distinctive names and leaf types. This stunning variegated century plant is sure to stand out in any garden, adding a touch of exotic beauty to your outdoor oasis. 

This Century plant is incredibly low-maintenance, requiring low water and very little attention from you. Whether you're an experienced gardener or just starting out, this plant is perfect for anyone who wants a gorgeous addition to their collection without all the fuss. 

Watering Needs 

This variegated century plant, like other succulents, is drought-tolerant by nature, and their fleshy, water-storing leaves can hold a lot of water.  However, their root structure is easily susceptible to overwatering so make sure that you don't overwater, as it can lead to root rot and fungal infections. 

When this variegated Americana agave is dormant in the winter, reduce watering to once every 4-6 weeks, soaking it completely.  During the growing season in summer, water the agave century plant once every 2-3 weeks. 

In spite of the right watering frequency, succulent roots can be damaged if the soil is not fast-draining.  Allow the pot and soil to dry out thoroughly between waterings. 

Light Requirements 

This century plants thrive best in bright, sunny environments. It cannot tolerate full shade or low light. The variegated agave americana should be planted in full sun outdoors. 

To ensure that your succulent thrives, provide it with 8-10 hours of direct light and a minimum of 5-6 hours of survivable bright light; the variegation of creamy yellow margins will be more pronounced in brighter light.  

When grown indoors, place it in the sunniest place in your house. This agave century plant may benefit from shade in consistently hot climates. It is ideal to grow this succulent in a west- or south-facing window. 

Optimal Soil & Fertilizer Needs 

Are you ready to take your Americana Variegata game to the next level?  When it comes to choosing the right soil and fertilizers for your adorable agave plants, you need to be extra cautious and need to use the right kind of sandy soil.  Moisture can be a real killer, leading to root and stem rot in no time flat. But fear not, my fellow green thumbs! Planet Desert has got your back with our specialized succulent potting mix that includes organic mycorrhizae – perfect for promoting healthy roots and happy plants. 

When it comes to fertilizing your variegated agave americana, it only needs a small amount of fertilizer applied once a year in spring. Century plants prefer a fertilizer with lower doses of NPK, with a maximum ratio of 5-10-5 that is higher in phosphorus than nitrogen. 

Hardiness Zones & More 

This century plant can tolerate mild frost but does best in sunny, warm climates. They are not entirely cold-hardy, though.  Generally, these can be grown in the garden in USDA zone 8 -11, and they can tolerate temperatures down to 20 F, but they may suffer damage if exposed to prolonged periods of freezing temperatures. 

So, if you live in an area with cold winters, it's best to protect these century plants by covering them with a frost cloth or moving it indoors during the coldest months. 

This Agave americana 'Variegata' century plant is quite a hardy plant that is suitable for beginners to grow in the garden and as houseplants. Their growth rate is slow, and they tend to last for many years. 

Bloom Season Mayjune
Bloom Season Summer
Botanical Name Agave americana
Botanical Name Agave americana 'Marginata'
Common Name American century plant
Common Name Variegated Century Plant
Dormancy Winter
Family Asparagaceae
Flower Color Green-yellow
Flower Color Yellow
Genus Agave
Growth Habit Rosette
Growth Rate Slow
Hardiness Zone 8, 9, 10, 11
Mature Size 2m
Mature Size 6 ft. tall, 10 ft. wide
Native Area Mexico
Plant Type Perennial succulent
Propagation By offsets, cuttings
Resistance Drought tolerant, pest resistant, mild frost tolerant
Resistance  10° to 50° f
Soil PH 6.5, Acidic, Neutral
Soil Type specialized succulent potting mix
Special Features Sword-like leaves
Sun Exposure Full sun, partial shade
Toxicity Toxic for humans, toxic for pets (Keeps away from Children)
Watering Needs Low

Pests & Common Problems of Century Plant

This century plant is hardy and easy to cultivate. It is uncommon for you to encounter difficulties with it. Let's go over some of the possibilities! 

Pest Infestation: These small, white, cotton-like insects' agave snout weevil can infest the foliage and roots of the century plant, causing wilting and yellowing of the leaves. Neem oil or insecticidal soap can be used to get rid of them. 

Root Rot: Overwatering and poorly-draining soil can cause root rot, which can lead to wilting and yellowing of the leaves. This can be prevented by allowing the soil to dry out between waterings and ensuring that the plant is growing in well-draining soil. 

Burning of Leaves: The tips of the new plants' leaves can become brown and crispy if the plant is exposed to too much direct sunlight. This can be prevented by providing the plant with bright, indirect sunlight or partial shade and avoiding direct sunlight for extended periods during the hottest part of the day. 

Underwatering: If the plant is not watered enough, the leaves can become wilted and yellow. This can be prevented by watering the plant when the top inch of soil is dry.

Century Plant FAQs

How do you care for a variegated century plant? 

The variegated century plants prefer bright, indirect sunlight, but too much can cause the tips to become brown and crispy. They can withstand droughts and reduce watering to once every 4-6 weeks.

They are resistant to pets but can be susceptible to mealybugs, spider mites, and scale insects. If living in an area with cold winters, it is best to protect the plant by covering it with a frost cloth or moving it indoors. Remove any dead or damaged leaves as needed, but avoid pruning the plant too much, as this can cause stress. 

How many times does a century plant bloom? 

Century plants typically bloom once in their lifetime, and mature plants produce yellow-green flowers. This can take anywhere from 10 to 30 years, depending on the availability and quantity of light, temperature, and humidity. After the plant blooms, it will die back, but it will produce offsets or "pups" that can be separated and replanted to continue the cycle. 

What is century plant good for? 

The century plant is primarily grown as an ornamental plant for its striking appearance and architectural shape. However, it has also been used for medicinal purposes by various cultures throughout history. 

The sap of the plant has been used as a topical treatment for burns, wounds, and insect bites, and the leaves have been used to make a tea that is said to have a calming effect. However, it's important to note that the sap of the plant can be irritating to the skin, so it should be used with caution. 

Why is Agave americana called a century plant? 

Agave Americana is commonly referred to as a century plant because it was once believed that it took 100 years for the plant to bloom. However, this is a common misconception. The plant actually blooms once in its lifetime, after it has reached maturity.  

This can take anywhere from 10 to 30 years, depending on light, temperature, and humidity. After the plant blooms, it will die back, but it will produce offsets or "pups" that can be separated and replanted to continue the cycle. 

How big does Agave Americana Variegata get? 

Variegated century plants can grow up to 6 feet tall and 8 feet wide, although the size can vary depending on growing conditions. These plants are slow-growing and can take almost several years to reach their full size. Its leaves are variegated with white or yellow stripes, making it a popular ornamental plant in gardens and landscapes.

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Variegated Century Plant - Agave americana 'Variegata'

sku: 813

14 reviews
Regular price$ 12.99
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Shipping calculated at checkout.

Size
Height:
Diameter:
Height: 9" - 11"
Diameter: 8"-10"
Height: 9"-11"
Diameter: 15"-20"
Height: 30"-35"
Diameter: 21"-23"

Please note: All Landscape Ready plants that are in a 6-inch pot or larger WILL NOT come with a pot as it will be shipped bare root.

  • In stock, ready to ship
  • Inventory on the way

Please note: Our large plants are many years old, and as a result, they might have minor scaring but will arrive 100% healthy and looking great.

Please note: Our large plants are shipped bare root. They are also many years old, and as a result, they might have minor scaring but will arrive healthy and looking great.

If you live in a cold climate and are expecting temperatures below 40 degrees within the next five days after placing your order, we highly recommend adding a heat pack to your order. If you do not order a heat pack, we do not send one with your order.

BUY HEAT PACKS HERE

**FREE HEAT PACK WITH ORDERS OVER $50 before taxes and shipping- BY REQUEST ONLY, PLEASE MAKE A NOTE ON YOUR ORDER.

To prevent plants from freezing while in transit, orders placed for areas with extreme severe freezing temperatures will be held for shipment until it is safe to ship.

Plants that are in 3.5" pots and smaller will be shipped in its pot to prevent any damage to the roots. Any plant that is 6" and larger WILL NOT come with a pot as it will be shipped bare root.

Depending on the species and season, you will receive a very similar plant to the one in the picture. It may or may not be blooming at the time of your purchase.

We ship via USPS Priority Mail, and we calculate the shipping cost based on the weight and volume of your purchase. Care instructions are included in every package you order. Please allow us up to 3 business days to process your order. Depending on your location, we will ship the plants on a certain day to avoid transit time during weekends or holidays. If you wish to receive your order on a specific date, or have special instructions, please add a note on your order. If you have any questions or comments, please feel free to contact us at any time.

  • Description
  • Key Plant Features

Introducing the Agave americana 'Variegata or Agave americana 'Marginata', a stunning variety of Agave americana. Agave Americana is commonly referred to as a century plant because it was once believed that it took 100 years for the plant to bloom. However, this is a common misconception.  

The century plant blooms light-green yellow flowers once in its lifetime after it has reached maturity. This can take anywhere from 10 to 30 years, depending on light, temperature, and humidity. Being monocarpic, the mother plant dies after blooming.  

The twisted, silvery-green leaves of this variegated century plant form a large rosette, and the leaf margins have bright yellow stripes that resemble a striped ribbon. Its stiff, rosette-shaped, sword-like leaves grow upright, and the mature plant can reach the height of 6 feet and 10 feet wide. Each leaf has a pointed, spiny tip and is armed with tiny brown hooks. This variegated type will grow a bit smaller than other Agaves Americans but still is bigger than the one with white stripes (non-variegated).  

Native to Mexico, there are numerous variegated forms of Agave americana, each with distinctive names and leaf types. This stunning variegated century plant is sure to stand out in any garden, adding a touch of exotic beauty to your outdoor oasis. 

This Century plant is incredibly low-maintenance, requiring low water and very little attention from you. Whether you're an experienced gardener or just starting out, this plant is perfect for anyone who wants a gorgeous addition to their collection without all the fuss. 

Watering Needs 

This variegated century plant, like other succulents, is drought-tolerant by nature, and their fleshy, water-storing leaves can hold a lot of water.  However, their root structure is easily susceptible to overwatering so make sure that you don't overwater, as it can lead to root rot and fungal infections. 

When this variegated Americana agave is dormant in the winter, reduce watering to once every 4-6 weeks, soaking it completely.  During the growing season in summer, water the agave century plant once every 2-3 weeks. 

In spite of the right watering frequency, succulent roots can be damaged if the soil is not fast-draining.  Allow the pot and soil to dry out thoroughly between waterings. 

Light Requirements 

This century plants thrive best in bright, sunny environments. It cannot tolerate full shade or low light. The variegated agave americana should be planted in full sun outdoors. 

To ensure that your succulent thrives, provide it with 8-10 hours of direct light and a minimum of 5-6 hours of survivable bright light; the variegation of creamy yellow margins will be more pronounced in brighter light.  

When grown indoors, place it in the sunniest place in your house. This agave century plant may benefit from shade in consistently hot climates. It is ideal to grow this succulent in a west- or south-facing window. 

Optimal Soil & Fertilizer Needs 

Are you ready to take your Americana Variegata game to the next level?  When it comes to choosing the right soil and fertilizers for your adorable agave plants, you need to be extra cautious and need to use the right kind of sandy soil.  Moisture can be a real killer, leading to root and stem rot in no time flat. But fear not, my fellow green thumbs! Planet Desert has got your back with our specialized succulent potting mix that includes organic mycorrhizae – perfect for promoting healthy roots and happy plants. 

When it comes to fertilizing your variegated agave americana, it only needs a small amount of fertilizer applied once a year in spring. Century plants prefer a fertilizer with lower doses of NPK, with a maximum ratio of 5-10-5 that is higher in phosphorus than nitrogen. 

Hardiness Zones & More 

This century plant can tolerate mild frost but does best in sunny, warm climates. They are not entirely cold-hardy, though.  Generally, these can be grown in the garden in USDA zone 8 -11, and they can tolerate temperatures down to 20 F, but they may suffer damage if exposed to prolonged periods of freezing temperatures. 

So, if you live in an area with cold winters, it's best to protect these century plants by covering them with a frost cloth or moving it indoors during the coldest months. 

This Agave americana 'Variegata' century plant is quite a hardy plant that is suitable for beginners to grow in the garden and as houseplants. Their growth rate is slow, and they tend to last for many years. 

Bloom Season Mayjune
Bloom Season Summer
Botanical Name Agave americana
Botanical Name Agave americana 'Marginata'
Common Name American century plant
Common Name Variegated Century Plant
Dormancy Winter
Family Asparagaceae
Flower Color Green-yellow
Flower Color Yellow
Genus Agave
Growth Habit Rosette
Growth Rate Slow
Hardiness Zone 8, 9, 10, 11
Mature Size 2m
Mature Size 6 ft. tall, 10 ft. wide
Native Area Mexico
Plant Type Perennial succulent
Propagation By offsets, cuttings
Resistance Drought tolerant, pest resistant, mild frost tolerant
Resistance  10° to 50° f
Soil PH 6.5, Acidic, Neutral
Soil Type specialized succulent potting mix
Special Features Sword-like leaves
Sun Exposure Full sun, partial shade
Toxicity Toxic for humans, toxic for pets (Keeps away from Children)
Watering Needs Low

Pests & Common Problems of Century Plant

This century plant is hardy and easy to cultivate. It is uncommon for you to encounter difficulties with it. Let's go over some of the possibilities! 

Pest Infestation: These small, white, cotton-like insects' agave snout weevil can infest the foliage and roots of the century plant, causing wilting and yellowing of the leaves. Neem oil or insecticidal soap can be used to get rid of them. 

Root Rot: Overwatering and poorly-draining soil can cause root rot, which can lead to wilting and yellowing of the leaves. This can be prevented by allowing the soil to dry out between waterings and ensuring that the plant is growing in well-draining soil. 

Burning of Leaves: The tips of the new plants' leaves can become brown and crispy if the plant is exposed to too much direct sunlight. This can be prevented by providing the plant with bright, indirect sunlight or partial shade and avoiding direct sunlight for extended periods during the hottest part of the day. 

Underwatering: If the plant is not watered enough, the leaves can become wilted and yellow. This can be prevented by watering the plant when the top inch of soil is dry.

Century Plant FAQs

How do you care for a variegated century plant? 

The variegated century plants prefer bright, indirect sunlight, but too much can cause the tips to become brown and crispy. They can withstand droughts and reduce watering to once every 4-6 weeks.

They are resistant to pets but can be susceptible to mealybugs, spider mites, and scale insects. If living in an area with cold winters, it is best to protect the plant by covering it with a frost cloth or moving it indoors. Remove any dead or damaged leaves as needed, but avoid pruning the plant too much, as this can cause stress. 

How many times does a century plant bloom? 

Century plants typically bloom once in their lifetime, and mature plants produce yellow-green flowers. This can take anywhere from 10 to 30 years, depending on the availability and quantity of light, temperature, and humidity. After the plant blooms, it will die back, but it will produce offsets or "pups" that can be separated and replanted to continue the cycle. 

What is century plant good for? 

The century plant is primarily grown as an ornamental plant for its striking appearance and architectural shape. However, it has also been used for medicinal purposes by various cultures throughout history. 

The sap of the plant has been used as a topical treatment for burns, wounds, and insect bites, and the leaves have been used to make a tea that is said to have a calming effect. However, it's important to note that the sap of the plant can be irritating to the skin, so it should be used with caution. 

Why is Agave americana called a century plant? 

Agave Americana is commonly referred to as a century plant because it was once believed that it took 100 years for the plant to bloom. However, this is a common misconception. The plant actually blooms once in its lifetime, after it has reached maturity.  

This can take anywhere from 10 to 30 years, depending on light, temperature, and humidity. After the plant blooms, it will die back, but it will produce offsets or "pups" that can be separated and replanted to continue the cycle. 

How big does Agave Americana Variegata get? 

Variegated century plants can grow up to 6 feet tall and 8 feet wide, although the size can vary depending on growing conditions. These plants are slow-growing and can take almost several years to reach their full size. Its leaves are variegated with white or yellow stripes, making it a popular ornamental plant in gardens and landscapes.

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