Crocodile Plant &
Crocodile Plant &
Crocodile Plant &
Crocodile Plant &
Crocodile Plant &
Crocodile Plant &
Crocodile Plant &
Crocodile Plant &
Crocodile Plant &
Crocodile Plant &
Crocodile Plant &
Crocodile Plant &

Get ready to meet the one and only Crocodile Plant, also known as Aloe brevifolia, a vibrant member of the Aloe genus! This little guy is a real showstopper with its teeth-like spikes that line each leaf and create a spine down its back like a crest of crocodile teeth, giving it its fierce common name, and also known as short-leaved aloe.  

However, it's important to note that this plant is mildly toxic and shouldn't be ingested by humans or pets.  It can thrive well in rock gardens, pots, and xeriscaping - making it an ideal small-scale groundcover too! And if you grow it just right in full sun, get ready for some seriously stunning colors as the tips turn shades of reds, yellows, and oranges when exposed to bright light. 

The aloe brevifolia crocodile plant, which grows in clumps up to 12 inches tall and wide in its natural habitat, is suitable for both indoor rock gardens and outdoor rock gardens in temperate climates. The blue-green leaves of the Aloe brevifolia crocodile plant have raised white spots that resemble thorns on the top and bottom, as well as soft white thorns on the leaf margins. The leaves sometimes acquire a lovely pinkish hue in cooler weather. 

While it is often confused with Aloe vera (aloe species), which is a very similar plant, Aloe brevifolia is primarily grown for its ornamental value and is not known to have any edible or medicinal properties. This plant can be propagated by removing offsets from the parent plant or by developing bare root cuttings.  

Hailing from South Africa, Aloe brevifolia grows faster during spring and fall. This beautiful aloe plant attracts birds, bees, and butterflies with its tall, red-pink flowers in late winter or early spring. Standing at less than a foot tall but with big personality traits such as thick triangular leaves colored glaucous green, yellow, blue, and gray - there's no denying that the Crocodile Plant makes for an exciting addition to any garden or container display! 

Watering needs 

Watering the drought tolerant Aloe brevifolia is a piece of cake! The leaves of this adorable succulent are full of water, so they do not require frequent, deep watering either. "Soak and dry " is the best approach in gardening in this case. 

During the growing season (spring and fall), it is recommended to water once every two weeks or so. In the winter and summer, when the plant is dormant, you can reduce watering to once a month. Be sure to use well-draining soil, and avoid getting water on the leaves or stem, as this can lead beautiful plants to rot. 

Keep an eye out for mushy, yellowing leaves, which are a sign of severe overwatering. If this occurs, repot your Aloe brevifolia crocodile plant in dry soil and avoid frequent watering of it. Whenever you touch the soil, if it feels like a desert with no sign of moisture in the soil, or if those cute little leaves start to turn yellow, look wrinkled, or shriveled up - that's when you know your crocodile plants are thirsty! 

If the plant needs water, give them some love by pouring water gently over the pots and around them until it drips off from the holes at the bottom of the pot.  With just a bit of attention paid to these little details, soon enough, your Aloe brevifolia plants will be thriving like never before. 

Light Requirements 

Aloe brevifolia needs a lot of sunlight in order to reach its full potential. You should expose the pot of this crocodile plant to direct sunlight every day for up to 4 hours. This may be simpler to accomplish if you are growing it outside, but if you want to grow it inside, all you need to do is set the potted succulent a few feet away from a south-facing window sill in your home. 

When exposed to direct sunlight, the leaves of this crocodile aloe plant change from their initial Blue-Green color to shades of red, Orange, and Pink. This is a natural response to the sun's UV rays and is a sign that the crocodile plant is producing more pigments to protect itself from the direct sun. In some cases, the leaves may also turn a yellowish color if they are not receiving enough light. On the other hand, if the leaves are thin and stretched out, it is also an indication that the plant is not receiving enough light. 

However, if the leaves are turning brown or black, this may be a sign of sunburn or over-watering the plant, which can be harmful to the plant. 

Optimal soil & Fertilizer Needs 

Use well-drained soil that is designed specifically for your Aloe brevifoia succulent. These specialty soil mixes have been precisely developed to imitate well-draining desert soils. That's why we at Planet Desert have got your back with our specialized succulent potting mix. This organic substrate has mycorrhizae which helps grow a healthy root system that makes all those spiky stems stand up tall and proud.  If you don't mind getting a bit of dirt on your hands and are okay with a basic gardening soil for your succulent, then you can save some money and make your own dry clay soil mix by simply combing healthy natural garden soil with equal parts of sand or perlite. 

And let's not forget about fertilizing! A small amount of fertilizer with an equal mixture of NPK (5-10-5) once a year in spring will do wonders for the roots and your plant's health and growth. Don't fertilize in the summer or winter. So, skip those harsh chemicals and give the roots of lace aloe and your succulent some love with some awesome organic fertilizer! Remember, avoid overfertilizing your aloe plants; it may cause fungal diseases and develop root rot. 

Hardiness Zones & More 

keep it at warm temperatures at all times. If the temperature falls below 20° F, bring your crocodile plant indoors. If you plant your Aloe brevifolia crocodile plant outdoors below that temperature, you won't likely be able to grow it. The leaves sometimes acquire a lovely pinkish hue in cooler weather. 

The crocodile plant is an outdoor tropical succulent that can be grown in USDA zones 8 and 11. In cooler zones, it can be kept outdoors during the summer and brought in as the temperature drops. It doesn't like humidity because it is adapted to a dry, hot climate. 

Be sure to add the Aloe brevifolia crocodile plant to your collection today and elevate the beauty of your home or garden with this stunning and healthy-looking plant. 

Bloom Season Late winter, early spring
Bloom Season Spring, summer
Botanical Name Aloe brevifolia
Common Name Crocodile plant
Common Name Crocodile plant, short leaf aloe
Dormancy Summer
Family Asphodelaceae
Flower Color Orange
Flower Color Orange, pink, red
Genus Aloe
Growth Habit Broadly triangular
Growth Habit Rosette
Growth Rate Fast
Growth Rate Fast growth
Hardiness Zone 8 to 11
Hardiness Zone 8, 9, 10, 11
Mature Size 12 in. tall , 12 in. wide
Mature Size 1’ to 2’ feet
Native Area South Africa
Plant Type Perennial succulent
Propagation By cuttings, offsets
Resistance 6.7° C
Resistance Drought tolerant, deer resistant, pest resistant, mild frost tolerant
Soil PH 6.5, Acidic, Neutral
Soil Type specialized succulent potting mix.
Special Features Beautiful ornamental plant
Sun Exposure Full sun
Sun Exposure Full sun, partial shade
Toxicity Toxic for humans, toxic for pets(Keeps away from Children)
Watering Needs Low

Pests & Common Problems of Aloe brevifolia

Aloe brevifolia is generally a low-maintenance plant, but it can still be susceptible to certain pests and problems. Overwatering is a common problem that can lead to root rot and other fungal diseases. Additionally, mealybugs and spider mites are known to infest Aloe brevifolia, causing damage to the leaves and stunting growth. It's important to monitor the plant regularly and take action at the first sign of any issues. 

FAQs - Aloe Brevifolia Plant

Does Aloe brevifolia flower? 

Yes, Aloe brevifolia does produce flowers. The flowers of this plant are typically pink or red in color and grow on tall stalks that emerge from the center of the plant. The flowers are tubular in shape and are a favorite of hummingbirds and other pollinators.

It typically blooms in the late winter or early spring, although the exact timing of the flowering can vary depending on the growing conditions and climate. While the flowers of Aloe brevifolia are an attractive feature of this plant, it is primarily grown for its striking foliage. 

Is Aloe brevifolia edible? 

There is no evidence to suggest that Aloe brevifolia is edible. While some species of Aloe are used for medicinal or culinary purposes and in drinks. Aloe brevifolia is primarily grown as an ornamental plant and is not known to have any edible or medicinal properties.  

In fact, the sap of this plant can be toxic if ingested in large quantities and can cause skin irritation or other adverse reactions in some people. Therefore, it is not recommended to consume Aloe brevifolia or any other species of Aloe unless you have consulted with a medical professional or other qualified expert. 

What is the use of Aloe Brevifolia? 

Aloe brevifolia is primarily grown as an ornamental plant due to its attractive and unique foliage. The leaves of this plant are thick and fleshy and have a bluish-green color with white spots. The plant is often used in succulent gardens, rock gardens, and other landscaping projects due to its striking appearance and ability to thrive in hot, dry conditions.  

While Aloe brevifolia is not typically used for medicinal or culinary purposes, some people believe that the sap of the plant has healing properties and may be used to treat burns, cuts, and other skin conditions.  

However, there is no scientific evidence to support these claims, and it is not recommended to use Aloe brevifolia or any other species of Aloe for medicinal purposes without consulting with a medical professional or other qualified expert. 

Is Aloe brevifolia the same as Aloe vera? 

No, Aloe brevifolia is not the same as aloe vera. While both plants belong to the Aloe genus and have similar medicinal properties, they differ in their physical appearance and geographic distribution. Aloe vera has longer leaves and is commonly found in tropical regions, while Aloe brevifolia has shorter leaves and is native to South Africa. Aloe vera can be consumed internally, whereas aloe brevifolia should not.   

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Crocodile Plant 'Aloe brevifolia'

sku: 337

7 reviews
Regular price$ 8.97
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Please note: All Landscape Ready plants that are in a 6-inch pot or larger WILL NOT come with a pot as it will be shipped bare root.

  • In stock, ready to ship
  • Inventory on the way

Please note: Our large plants are many years old, and as a result, they might have minor scaring but will arrive 100% healthy and looking great.

Please note: Our large plants are shipped bare root. They are also many years old, and as a result, they might have minor scaring but will arrive healthy and looking great.

If you live in a cold climate and are expecting temperatures below 40 degrees within the next five days after placing your order, we highly recommend adding a heat pack to your order. If you do not order a heat pack, we do not send one with your order.

BUY HEAT PACKS HERE

**FREE HEAT PACK WITH ORDERS OVER $50 before taxes and shipping- BY REQUEST ONLY, PLEASE MAKE A NOTE ON YOUR ORDER.

To prevent plants from freezing while in transit, orders placed for areas with extreme severe freezing temperatures will be held for shipment until it is safe to ship.

Plants that are in 3.5" pots and smaller will be shipped in its pot to prevent any damage to the roots. Any plant that is 6" and larger WILL NOT come with a pot as it will be shipped bare root.

Depending on the species and season, you will receive a very similar plant to the one in the picture. It may or may not be blooming at the time of your purchase.

We ship via USPS Priority Mail, and we calculate the shipping cost based on the weight and volume of your purchase. Care instructions are included in every package you order. Please allow us up to 3 business days to process your order. Depending on your location, we will ship the plants on a certain day to avoid transit time during weekends or holidays. If you wish to receive your order on a specific date, or have special instructions, please add a note on your order. If you have any questions or comments, please feel free to contact us at any time.

  • Description
  • Key Plant Features

Get ready to meet the one and only Crocodile Plant, also known as Aloe brevifolia, a vibrant member of the Aloe genus! This little guy is a real showstopper with its teeth-like spikes that line each leaf and create a spine down its back like a crest of crocodile teeth, giving it its fierce common name, and also known as short-leaved aloe.  

However, it's important to note that this plant is mildly toxic and shouldn't be ingested by humans or pets.  It can thrive well in rock gardens, pots, and xeriscaping - making it an ideal small-scale groundcover too! And if you grow it just right in full sun, get ready for some seriously stunning colors as the tips turn shades of reds, yellows, and oranges when exposed to bright light. 

The aloe brevifolia crocodile plant, which grows in clumps up to 12 inches tall and wide in its natural habitat, is suitable for both indoor rock gardens and outdoor rock gardens in temperate climates. The blue-green leaves of the Aloe brevifolia crocodile plant have raised white spots that resemble thorns on the top and bottom, as well as soft white thorns on the leaf margins. The leaves sometimes acquire a lovely pinkish hue in cooler weather. 

While it is often confused with Aloe vera (aloe species), which is a very similar plant, Aloe brevifolia is primarily grown for its ornamental value and is not known to have any edible or medicinal properties. This plant can be propagated by removing offsets from the parent plant or by developing bare root cuttings.  

Hailing from South Africa, Aloe brevifolia grows faster during spring and fall. This beautiful aloe plant attracts birds, bees, and butterflies with its tall, red-pink flowers in late winter or early spring. Standing at less than a foot tall but with big personality traits such as thick triangular leaves colored glaucous green, yellow, blue, and gray - there's no denying that the Crocodile Plant makes for an exciting addition to any garden or container display! 

Watering needs 

Watering the drought tolerant Aloe brevifolia is a piece of cake! The leaves of this adorable succulent are full of water, so they do not require frequent, deep watering either. "Soak and dry " is the best approach in gardening in this case. 

During the growing season (spring and fall), it is recommended to water once every two weeks or so. In the winter and summer, when the plant is dormant, you can reduce watering to once a month. Be sure to use well-draining soil, and avoid getting water on the leaves or stem, as this can lead beautiful plants to rot. 

Keep an eye out for mushy, yellowing leaves, which are a sign of severe overwatering. If this occurs, repot your Aloe brevifolia crocodile plant in dry soil and avoid frequent watering of it. Whenever you touch the soil, if it feels like a desert with no sign of moisture in the soil, or if those cute little leaves start to turn yellow, look wrinkled, or shriveled up - that's when you know your crocodile plants are thirsty! 

If the plant needs water, give them some love by pouring water gently over the pots and around them until it drips off from the holes at the bottom of the pot.  With just a bit of attention paid to these little details, soon enough, your Aloe brevifolia plants will be thriving like never before. 

Light Requirements 

Aloe brevifolia needs a lot of sunlight in order to reach its full potential. You should expose the pot of this crocodile plant to direct sunlight every day for up to 4 hours. This may be simpler to accomplish if you are growing it outside, but if you want to grow it inside, all you need to do is set the potted succulent a few feet away from a south-facing window sill in your home. 

When exposed to direct sunlight, the leaves of this crocodile aloe plant change from their initial Blue-Green color to shades of red, Orange, and Pink. This is a natural response to the sun's UV rays and is a sign that the crocodile plant is producing more pigments to protect itself from the direct sun. In some cases, the leaves may also turn a yellowish color if they are not receiving enough light. On the other hand, if the leaves are thin and stretched out, it is also an indication that the plant is not receiving enough light. 

However, if the leaves are turning brown or black, this may be a sign of sunburn or over-watering the plant, which can be harmful to the plant. 

Optimal soil & Fertilizer Needs 

Use well-drained soil that is designed specifically for your Aloe brevifoia succulent. These specialty soil mixes have been precisely developed to imitate well-draining desert soils. That's why we at Planet Desert have got your back with our specialized succulent potting mix. This organic substrate has mycorrhizae which helps grow a healthy root system that makes all those spiky stems stand up tall and proud.  If you don't mind getting a bit of dirt on your hands and are okay with a basic gardening soil for your succulent, then you can save some money and make your own dry clay soil mix by simply combing healthy natural garden soil with equal parts of sand or perlite. 

And let's not forget about fertilizing! A small amount of fertilizer with an equal mixture of NPK (5-10-5) once a year in spring will do wonders for the roots and your plant's health and growth. Don't fertilize in the summer or winter. So, skip those harsh chemicals and give the roots of lace aloe and your succulent some love with some awesome organic fertilizer! Remember, avoid overfertilizing your aloe plants; it may cause fungal diseases and develop root rot. 

Hardiness Zones & More 

keep it at warm temperatures at all times. If the temperature falls below 20° F, bring your crocodile plant indoors. If you plant your Aloe brevifolia crocodile plant outdoors below that temperature, you won't likely be able to grow it. The leaves sometimes acquire a lovely pinkish hue in cooler weather. 

The crocodile plant is an outdoor tropical succulent that can be grown in USDA zones 8 and 11. In cooler zones, it can be kept outdoors during the summer and brought in as the temperature drops. It doesn't like humidity because it is adapted to a dry, hot climate. 

Be sure to add the Aloe brevifolia crocodile plant to your collection today and elevate the beauty of your home or garden with this stunning and healthy-looking plant. 

Bloom Season Late winter, early spring
Bloom Season Spring, summer
Botanical Name Aloe brevifolia
Common Name Crocodile plant
Common Name Crocodile plant, short leaf aloe
Dormancy Summer
Family Asphodelaceae
Flower Color Orange
Flower Color Orange, pink, red
Genus Aloe
Growth Habit Broadly triangular
Growth Habit Rosette
Growth Rate Fast
Growth Rate Fast growth
Hardiness Zone 8 to 11
Hardiness Zone 8, 9, 10, 11
Mature Size 12 in. tall , 12 in. wide
Mature Size 1’ to 2’ feet
Native Area South Africa
Plant Type Perennial succulent
Propagation By cuttings, offsets
Resistance 6.7° C
Resistance Drought tolerant, deer resistant, pest resistant, mild frost tolerant
Soil PH 6.5, Acidic, Neutral
Soil Type specialized succulent potting mix.
Special Features Beautiful ornamental plant
Sun Exposure Full sun
Sun Exposure Full sun, partial shade
Toxicity Toxic for humans, toxic for pets(Keeps away from Children)
Watering Needs Low

Pests & Common Problems of Aloe brevifolia

Aloe brevifolia is generally a low-maintenance plant, but it can still be susceptible to certain pests and problems. Overwatering is a common problem that can lead to root rot and other fungal diseases. Additionally, mealybugs and spider mites are known to infest Aloe brevifolia, causing damage to the leaves and stunting growth. It's important to monitor the plant regularly and take action at the first sign of any issues. 

FAQs - Aloe Brevifolia Plant

Does Aloe brevifolia flower? 

Yes, Aloe brevifolia does produce flowers. The flowers of this plant are typically pink or red in color and grow on tall stalks that emerge from the center of the plant. The flowers are tubular in shape and are a favorite of hummingbirds and other pollinators.

It typically blooms in the late winter or early spring, although the exact timing of the flowering can vary depending on the growing conditions and climate. While the flowers of Aloe brevifolia are an attractive feature of this plant, it is primarily grown for its striking foliage. 

Is Aloe brevifolia edible? 

There is no evidence to suggest that Aloe brevifolia is edible. While some species of Aloe are used for medicinal or culinary purposes and in drinks. Aloe brevifolia is primarily grown as an ornamental plant and is not known to have any edible or medicinal properties.  

In fact, the sap of this plant can be toxic if ingested in large quantities and can cause skin irritation or other adverse reactions in some people. Therefore, it is not recommended to consume Aloe brevifolia or any other species of Aloe unless you have consulted with a medical professional or other qualified expert. 

What is the use of Aloe Brevifolia? 

Aloe brevifolia is primarily grown as an ornamental plant due to its attractive and unique foliage. The leaves of this plant are thick and fleshy and have a bluish-green color with white spots. The plant is often used in succulent gardens, rock gardens, and other landscaping projects due to its striking appearance and ability to thrive in hot, dry conditions.  

While Aloe brevifolia is not typically used for medicinal or culinary purposes, some people believe that the sap of the plant has healing properties and may be used to treat burns, cuts, and other skin conditions.  

However, there is no scientific evidence to support these claims, and it is not recommended to use Aloe brevifolia or any other species of Aloe for medicinal purposes without consulting with a medical professional or other qualified expert. 

Is Aloe brevifolia the same as Aloe vera? 

No, Aloe brevifolia is not the same as aloe vera. While both plants belong to the Aloe genus and have similar medicinal properties, they differ in their physical appearance and geographic distribution. Aloe vera has longer leaves and is commonly found in tropical regions, while Aloe brevifolia has shorter leaves and is native to South Africa. Aloe vera can be consumed internally, whereas aloe brevifolia should not.   

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