Cyphostemma juttae
Cyphostemma juttae
Cyphostemma juttae
Cyphostemma juttae
Cyphostemma juttae
Cyphostemma juttae
Cyphostemma juttae
Cyphostemma juttae
Cyphostemma juttae
Cyphostemma juttae
Cyphostemma juttae

Introducing the rare Cyphostemma juttae, a fascinating and unique succulent plant, a member of the Cyphostemma genus. It has several other common names, such as Namibia grape, wild grape, and tree grape, because of its large grape-like bunches. This summer-growing species is known for its striking appearance and impressive growth habit. 

Originally from Namibia, it grows in rocky, arid areas covered by open, semi-tropical forests exposed to very dry and hot conditions. The Cyphostemma juttae has thick, succulent stems that can grow up to several 6 feet tall and 6 feet wide, giving it a tree-like appearance. The yellow-green stems are covered in a thick, corky bark that helps protect the wild grape from the intense heat and dry conditions of its natural habitat. 

The leaves of this Cyphostemma juttae are large, ovate, shiny, toothed, and they typically fall off during the winter, helping the plant conserve water. The caudex can become quite large and impressive over time, adding to its unique and visually appealing characteristics. 

The flowers of Cyphostemma juttae are in small and inconspicuous, greenish-yellow clusters that can add a touch of beauty to its already impressive appearance. This succulent, with its inconspicuous flowers, is a true showpiece for both containers and gardens due to its large grape-like bunches of bright wine-colored berries at the end of summer. 

To propagate Cyphostemma juttae, you can try using stem cuttings or seeds for successful reproduction. Cuttings should be repotted in coarse river sand or in a well-drained potting mix.

Watering Needs 

The Cyphostemma juttae, being a drought-tolerant succulent plant, has low watering needs. Like other caudiciform plants, it is important to allow the soil to dry out completely between waterings to prevent overwatering, which can lead to root rot. During the summer growing season, water your Cyphostemma sparingly to keep the plant cool. Make sure the soil is thoroughly soaked before watering again. 

In contrast, during the dormant period in colder winter months, you should reduce watering significantly as your Cyphostemma juttae requires less moisture. It is best to water only when the soil is completely dry, about once every few weeks or even less frequently. Remember, this succulent is adapted to arid conditions, so it is more tolerant of underwatering than overwatering. 

Observing the Cyphostemma juttae leaves can also provide clues about their watering needs. If the leaves appear plump and firm, it indicates that it is well-hydrated. On the other hand, if the leaves start to wrinkle or become soft, it may be a sign that your succulent needs water. Always remember to adjust your watering routine based on the specific conditions of your environment and the individual needs of Cyphostemma juttae, as too often, plants die as a result of overwatering. 

Light Requirements 

The Cyphostemma juttae loves basking in full sunlight to partial shade for at least 4-6 hours daily! It craves those rays to thrive and show off its unique features. Find a sunny spot near a south-facing window or in a well-lit area of your home where it can soak up the light. However, be careful not to expose your fully grown plant to direct sunlight for extended periods, as it can scorch the leaves. 

If you're growing the Cyphostemma juttae outdoors, make sure to provide it with some shade during the hottest parts of the day to protect it from intense sunlight. This Cyphostemma is well-suited to arid and desert-like environments, so it can handle a good amount of sunlight. Just keep an eye on it to ensure it's not getting too much direct exposure. 

Remember, each succulent plant is unique, so pay attention to how your Cyphostemma juttae responds to the light conditions in your specific location. If it starts to show signs of sunburn, like yellowing or browning leaves, it may be an indication that it needs a bit more shade. On the other hand, if it becomes leggy or stretches towards the light, it might be a sign that it needs more direct sunlight. 

In summary, the Cyphostemma juttae enjoys bright, indirect sunlight and can tolerate some direct sunlight, but be mindful of its individual needs and adjust the light conditions accordingly. 

Optimal Soil & Fertilizer Needs 

The Cyphostemma juttae favors heavy clay soils, loamy or sandy soil that drains well. Planting them in ordinary soil quality will result in compacted roots, stunted growth, and, most likely, root rot. Instead, make or buy a well-draining potting mix, or ideally use our specialized succulent potting mix that contains 5 natural substrates and mycorrhizae to promote the development of a strong root system that helps your succulent to thrive. 

When it comes to fertilizing the Cyphostemma juttae, it doesn't require excessive amounts of nutrients. A balanced, low-to-medium strength fertilizer can be applied during the growing season, such as a 5-10-5 fertilizer. However, it's important not to over-fertilize, as this can lead to excessive growth and potentially harm the Cyphostemma plant. 

Remember, it's always a good idea to observe your succulent for any signs of nutrient deficiencies or excesses. If you notice pale or yellowing leaves, it may be a sign that the plant needs some additional nutrients. Adjusting the fertilizer application accordingly can help maintain the health and vitality of your Cyphostemma juttae. 

Hardiness Zone & More 

The Cyphostemma juttae are hardy to 26 F (or less), but it is best to avoid freezing temperatures, especially if the plants are young. Cyphostemma comes from the hot, dry areas of southern Africa, so it has no problem taking temperatures up to 65 F - 85 F; however, it may need some afternoon shade in hot climates to avoid leaf burn. In terms of hardiness zones, the Cyphostemma juttae is typically suited for USDA hardiness zones 9-11. 

In these zones, the very sought-after plant Cyphostemma juttae can withstand mild winter temperatures and thrive in the warm, sunny conditions of its natural habitat.It is advisable to keep plants in large containers that can be transferred quickly to a protected area if one lives in a very damp environment. Since cyphostemmas are only partially resistant to frost, this is also beneficial in areas with severe frost. Therefore, if you live in a colder region, it's best to grow your Cyphostemma jutte as a container plant that can be brought indoors during the winter months or provide protection from frost.

With the help of Cyphostemma juttae, you'll start to spend less time maintaining your garden and more time taking in its beauty! 

Bloom Season Early summer
Botanical Name Cyphostemma juttae
Common Name Wild grape, tree grape, Namibian grape
Dormancy Winter
Family Vitaceae
Flower Color Greenish, yellow
Genus Cyphostemma
Growth Habit Bottle shaped, Tree like
Growth Rate Slow
Hardiness Zone 9, 10, 11
Mature Size 6 ft. tall, 6 ft. wide
Native Area Namibia
Plant Type Tree like Succulent
Propagation By stem cuttings, seed
Resistance Drought tolerant, pest resistant, heat tolerant
Soil PH 6.5, Acidic, Neutral
Special Features Easy to maintain, easy to grow
Sun Exposure Full sun, partial shade
Toxicity Mildly toxic to humans, mildly toxic to pets
Watering Needs Low

Pests & Common Problems of the Cyphostemma juttae

Native to South America, it is generally resistant to many pests and diseases, but there are a few common problems that can affect its health. 

Mealybugs: These small, white, cottony insects can infest your Cyphostemma juttae, especially in warm and humid conditions. Use a cotton swab dipped in rubbing alcohol to remove them, or consider using an organic insecticidal soap. 

Scale insects: These tiny, oval-shaped pests can latch onto the stems and leaves of your succulent, sucking out its sap. Wiping them off with a soft cloth soaked in soapy water or using horticultural oil can help control their population. 

Root rot: Overwatering or poorly draining soil can lead to root rot, causing the Cyphostemma juttae roots to become mushy and discolored. Ensure proper drainage and avoid overwatering to prevent this problem.

Sunburn: The Cyphostemma juttae prefers bright, indirect sunlight, but prolonged exposure to intense sunlight can cause sunburn on its leaves. Provide some shade during the hottest part of the day, or move your grape succulent to a spot with filtered light. 

Nutrient deficiencies: Lack of essential nutrients can lead to stunted growth and yellowing leaves. Ensure the plant is receiving balanced fertilization, and consider adding a slow-release fertilizer to provide a steady supply of nutrients. 

Remember, regular observation and care can help prevent and manage these issues. If you notice any problems, take prompt action to address them and keep your Cyphostemma juttae healthy and thriving!

FAQs - Cyphostemma juttae Plant

Is Cyphostemma Juttae poisonous? 

The Cyphostemma juttae (Namibian grape or tree gape) is considered mildly poisonous. However, as with any succulent plant, it's always a good idea to exercise caution and avoid ingesting large quantities of any part of the plant without proper knowledge or guidance.  

How do you care for Cyphostemma juttae? 

To care for Cyphostemma juttae (Namibian grape or tree gape), place it in a spot with bright, indirect sunlight for at least 4-6 hours daily. Water it sparingly, allowing the soil to dry between waterings. Make sure to use well-drained soil and avoid overwatering to prevent root rot.  

During the growing season, once a year in the spring, provide natural balanced fertilizer (5-10-5). Protect it from frost and prune it as needed to maintain its shape. If you live in a frost-free environment in USDA zones 9-11, you can grow these Namibian trees outdoors year-round.

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Cyphostemma juttae

sku: 1004

15 reviews
Regular price$ 17.29
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Shipping calculated at checkout.

Size

Please note: All Landscape Ready plants that are in a 6-inch pot or larger WILL NOT come with a pot as it will be shipped bare root.

  • In stock, ready to ship
  • Inventory on the way

Please note: Our large plants are many years old, and as a result, they might have minor scaring but will arrive 100% healthy and looking great.

Please note: Our large plants are shipped bare root. They are also many years old, and as a result, they might have minor scaring but will arrive healthy and looking great.

If you live in a cold climate and are expecting temperatures below 40 degrees within the next five days after placing your order, we highly recommend adding a heat pack to your order. If you do not order a heat pack, we do not send one with your order.

BUY HEAT PACKS HERE

**FREE HEAT PACK WITH ORDERS OVER $50 before taxes and shipping- BY REQUEST ONLY, PLEASE MAKE A NOTE ON YOUR ORDER.

To prevent plants from freezing while in transit, orders placed for areas with extreme severe freezing temperatures will be held for shipment until it is safe to ship.

Plants that are in 3.5" pots and smaller will be shipped in its pot to prevent any damage to the roots. Any plant that is 6" and larger WILL NOT come with a pot as it will be shipped bare root.

Depending on the species and season, you will receive a very similar plant to the one in the picture. It may or may not be blooming at the time of your purchase.

We ship via USPS Priority Mail, and we calculate the shipping cost based on the weight and volume of your purchase. Care instructions are included in every package you order. Please allow us up to 3 business days to process your order. Depending on your location, we will ship the plants on a certain day to avoid transit time during weekends or holidays. If you wish to receive your order on a specific date, or have special instructions, please add a note on your order. If you have any questions or comments, please feel free to contact us at any time.

  • Description
  • Key Plant Features

Introducing the rare Cyphostemma juttae, a fascinating and unique succulent plant, a member of the Cyphostemma genus. It has several other common names, such as Namibia grape, wild grape, and tree grape, because of its large grape-like bunches. This summer-growing species is known for its striking appearance and impressive growth habit. 

Originally from Namibia, it grows in rocky, arid areas covered by open, semi-tropical forests exposed to very dry and hot conditions. The Cyphostemma juttae has thick, succulent stems that can grow up to several 6 feet tall and 6 feet wide, giving it a tree-like appearance. The yellow-green stems are covered in a thick, corky bark that helps protect the wild grape from the intense heat and dry conditions of its natural habitat. 

The leaves of this Cyphostemma juttae are large, ovate, shiny, toothed, and they typically fall off during the winter, helping the plant conserve water. The caudex can become quite large and impressive over time, adding to its unique and visually appealing characteristics. 

The flowers of Cyphostemma juttae are in small and inconspicuous, greenish-yellow clusters that can add a touch of beauty to its already impressive appearance. This succulent, with its inconspicuous flowers, is a true showpiece for both containers and gardens due to its large grape-like bunches of bright wine-colored berries at the end of summer. 

To propagate Cyphostemma juttae, you can try using stem cuttings or seeds for successful reproduction. Cuttings should be repotted in coarse river sand or in a well-drained potting mix.

Watering Needs 

The Cyphostemma juttae, being a drought-tolerant succulent plant, has low watering needs. Like other caudiciform plants, it is important to allow the soil to dry out completely between waterings to prevent overwatering, which can lead to root rot. During the summer growing season, water your Cyphostemma sparingly to keep the plant cool. Make sure the soil is thoroughly soaked before watering again. 

In contrast, during the dormant period in colder winter months, you should reduce watering significantly as your Cyphostemma juttae requires less moisture. It is best to water only when the soil is completely dry, about once every few weeks or even less frequently. Remember, this succulent is adapted to arid conditions, so it is more tolerant of underwatering than overwatering. 

Observing the Cyphostemma juttae leaves can also provide clues about their watering needs. If the leaves appear plump and firm, it indicates that it is well-hydrated. On the other hand, if the leaves start to wrinkle or become soft, it may be a sign that your succulent needs water. Always remember to adjust your watering routine based on the specific conditions of your environment and the individual needs of Cyphostemma juttae, as too often, plants die as a result of overwatering. 

Light Requirements 

The Cyphostemma juttae loves basking in full sunlight to partial shade for at least 4-6 hours daily! It craves those rays to thrive and show off its unique features. Find a sunny spot near a south-facing window or in a well-lit area of your home where it can soak up the light. However, be careful not to expose your fully grown plant to direct sunlight for extended periods, as it can scorch the leaves. 

If you're growing the Cyphostemma juttae outdoors, make sure to provide it with some shade during the hottest parts of the day to protect it from intense sunlight. This Cyphostemma is well-suited to arid and desert-like environments, so it can handle a good amount of sunlight. Just keep an eye on it to ensure it's not getting too much direct exposure. 

Remember, each succulent plant is unique, so pay attention to how your Cyphostemma juttae responds to the light conditions in your specific location. If it starts to show signs of sunburn, like yellowing or browning leaves, it may be an indication that it needs a bit more shade. On the other hand, if it becomes leggy or stretches towards the light, it might be a sign that it needs more direct sunlight. 

In summary, the Cyphostemma juttae enjoys bright, indirect sunlight and can tolerate some direct sunlight, but be mindful of its individual needs and adjust the light conditions accordingly. 

Optimal Soil & Fertilizer Needs 

The Cyphostemma juttae favors heavy clay soils, loamy or sandy soil that drains well. Planting them in ordinary soil quality will result in compacted roots, stunted growth, and, most likely, root rot. Instead, make or buy a well-draining potting mix, or ideally use our specialized succulent potting mix that contains 5 natural substrates and mycorrhizae to promote the development of a strong root system that helps your succulent to thrive. 

When it comes to fertilizing the Cyphostemma juttae, it doesn't require excessive amounts of nutrients. A balanced, low-to-medium strength fertilizer can be applied during the growing season, such as a 5-10-5 fertilizer. However, it's important not to over-fertilize, as this can lead to excessive growth and potentially harm the Cyphostemma plant. 

Remember, it's always a good idea to observe your succulent for any signs of nutrient deficiencies or excesses. If you notice pale or yellowing leaves, it may be a sign that the plant needs some additional nutrients. Adjusting the fertilizer application accordingly can help maintain the health and vitality of your Cyphostemma juttae. 

Hardiness Zone & More 

The Cyphostemma juttae are hardy to 26 F (or less), but it is best to avoid freezing temperatures, especially if the plants are young. Cyphostemma comes from the hot, dry areas of southern Africa, so it has no problem taking temperatures up to 65 F - 85 F; however, it may need some afternoon shade in hot climates to avoid leaf burn. In terms of hardiness zones, the Cyphostemma juttae is typically suited for USDA hardiness zones 9-11. 

In these zones, the very sought-after plant Cyphostemma juttae can withstand mild winter temperatures and thrive in the warm, sunny conditions of its natural habitat.It is advisable to keep plants in large containers that can be transferred quickly to a protected area if one lives in a very damp environment. Since cyphostemmas are only partially resistant to frost, this is also beneficial in areas with severe frost. Therefore, if you live in a colder region, it's best to grow your Cyphostemma jutte as a container plant that can be brought indoors during the winter months or provide protection from frost.

With the help of Cyphostemma juttae, you'll start to spend less time maintaining your garden and more time taking in its beauty! 

Bloom Season Early summer
Botanical Name Cyphostemma juttae
Common Name Wild grape, tree grape, Namibian grape
Dormancy Winter
Family Vitaceae
Flower Color Greenish, yellow
Genus Cyphostemma
Growth Habit Bottle shaped, Tree like
Growth Rate Slow
Hardiness Zone 9, 10, 11
Mature Size 6 ft. tall, 6 ft. wide
Native Area Namibia
Plant Type Tree like Succulent
Propagation By stem cuttings, seed
Resistance Drought tolerant, pest resistant, heat tolerant
Soil PH 6.5, Acidic, Neutral
Special Features Easy to maintain, easy to grow
Sun Exposure Full sun, partial shade
Toxicity Mildly toxic to humans, mildly toxic to pets
Watering Needs Low

Pests & Common Problems of the Cyphostemma juttae

Native to South America, it is generally resistant to many pests and diseases, but there are a few common problems that can affect its health. 

Mealybugs: These small, white, cottony insects can infest your Cyphostemma juttae, especially in warm and humid conditions. Use a cotton swab dipped in rubbing alcohol to remove them, or consider using an organic insecticidal soap. 

Scale insects: These tiny, oval-shaped pests can latch onto the stems and leaves of your succulent, sucking out its sap. Wiping them off with a soft cloth soaked in soapy water or using horticultural oil can help control their population. 

Root rot: Overwatering or poorly draining soil can lead to root rot, causing the Cyphostemma juttae roots to become mushy and discolored. Ensure proper drainage and avoid overwatering to prevent this problem.

Sunburn: The Cyphostemma juttae prefers bright, indirect sunlight, but prolonged exposure to intense sunlight can cause sunburn on its leaves. Provide some shade during the hottest part of the day, or move your grape succulent to a spot with filtered light. 

Nutrient deficiencies: Lack of essential nutrients can lead to stunted growth and yellowing leaves. Ensure the plant is receiving balanced fertilization, and consider adding a slow-release fertilizer to provide a steady supply of nutrients. 

Remember, regular observation and care can help prevent and manage these issues. If you notice any problems, take prompt action to address them and keep your Cyphostemma juttae healthy and thriving!

FAQs - Cyphostemma juttae Plant

Is Cyphostemma Juttae poisonous? 

The Cyphostemma juttae (Namibian grape or tree gape) is considered mildly poisonous. However, as with any succulent plant, it's always a good idea to exercise caution and avoid ingesting large quantities of any part of the plant without proper knowledge or guidance.  

How do you care for Cyphostemma juttae? 

To care for Cyphostemma juttae (Namibian grape or tree gape), place it in a spot with bright, indirect sunlight for at least 4-6 hours daily. Water it sparingly, allowing the soil to dry between waterings. Make sure to use well-drained soil and avoid overwatering to prevent root rot.  

During the growing season, once a year in the spring, provide natural balanced fertilizer (5-10-5). Protect it from frost and prune it as needed to maintain its shape. If you live in a frost-free environment in USDA zones 9-11, you can grow these Namibian trees outdoors year-round.

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