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Are you ready for a succulent sensation that will set your heart ablaze? Look no further than the incredible Lace Aloe - Aloe aristata (Aristaloe aristata) is vibrant among the aloe genus! The Lace Aloe gets its name from the intricate, lacy patterns on its leaves. The scientific name of this low-growing perennial succulent, Aloe, is derived from the Arabic. The specific epithet aristata means "bearing bristles or a beard." It is sometimes also known as torch plant and Guinea-fowl Aloe.

This lace aloe is not just any ordinary houseplant; it's a compact, hardy succulent that has recently undergone reclassification. The lace aloe is grown primarily for its attractive succulent rosettes with yellow spots and white bumps on dark green leaves with lacy edges and soft white spines.

Hailing all the way from South Africa, the Aloe aristata can grow up to 8 inches tall and 6 inches wide. From wide bottoms to sharper points at the top, these leaves are pure perfection. This sun-loving Aloe aristata plant thrives on warmth and dryness; it's like having your very own sunshine-filled oasis indoors or outdoors in xeriscape landscapes. This frost-hardy wonder boasts leaves that mimic the elegance of Haworthia plants and grows at an astonishing pace.  

Under just the right conditions, these pollinator-friendly lace aloe plants bloom with tubular orange-red lace aloe flowers during the sizzling summer months, that attract both bees and hummingbirds alike talk about being irresistible to nature's most delightful creatures! Lace Aloe propagation can be achieved by offsets or leaf cuttings. Offsets are small plantlets that grow from the base of the mother plant. So why wait? Get ready for an enchanting adventure with our extraordinary Aloe aristata lace aloe!"

Watering Need

The Lace Aloe has moderate watering needs. It is a succulent plant that prefers to be underwatered rather than overwatered. Its large, fleshy succulent stems and lanceolate leaves store water for use during times of drought. It's pretty risky to feed it too much water because it doesn't require it because of this adaptation.

This will result in the water being in the soil for an extended period of time, which will be disastrous for the torch plant roots. So, it is important to allow the soil to dry out between waterings to prevent root rot. 

When watering, make sure to thoroughly saturate the soil and then allow it to completely dry before watering again. This Aloe plant is drought-tolerant and can withstand periods of dryness, so it's better to err on the side of underwatering. 

 In terms of frequency, during the active growing season (spring and summer), you can water the Lace Aloe every two to three weeks. However, during the dormant period (fall and winter), reduce watering to once a month or even less, as the lace aloe plant requires less moisture during this time. It's always a good idea to check the moisture level of the soil before watering to ensure it is dry.

Light Requirements

Aloe Aristata prefers bright, indirect light. It thrives in a location with plenty of natural sunlight, such as a south-facing window. However, it's important to protect the aloe aristata from intense, direct sunlight, as it can cause the leaves to become scorched. If you notice the leaves turning brown or yellow, it may be a sign that the aloe aristata plant is receiving too much light.

If you're growing the Lace Aloe indoors, you can place it near a window where it can receive bright, filtered light throughout the day. If your home doesn't receive much natural light, you can also use artificial grow lights to provide the necessary light for the plant's growth. Just make sure to position the lights a few feet away from the plant to prevent heat damage. 

Remember, finding the right balance of light is crucial for the health of the Lace Aloe. If the aristata lace aloe isn't receiving enough light, it may become leggy, and its growth may slow down. On the other hand, too much light can cause the leaves to become discolored or sunburned. Observing the Aloe aristata response to its current light conditions and making adjustments as needed will help ensure its well-being.

Optimal Soil & Fertilizer Needs

The Lace Aloe thrives in well-drained soil that mimics its natural habitat. A coarse sand or gritty soil mix is ideal for this succulent plant, as it allows excess water to drain away quickly and prevents the roots from sitting in soggy soil. Instead, simply mix garden soil or buy a well-draining potting mix, or ideally use our specialized succulent potting mix that contains 5 natural substrates and mycorrhizae to promote the development of a strong root system that helps your succulent to thrive.

When it comes to fertilizer, the aristaloe aristata Lace Aloe is not a heavy feeder. It can thrive in nutrient-poor soil, so you don't need to fertilize it frequently. During the growing season, which is typically in spring, you can apply a balanced natural fertilizer once a year.

However, it's important to note that succulents like the Lace Aloe are more prone to damage from overfertilization than underfertilization. Excessive fertilizer can lead to burnt roots and other issues. So, it's best to err on the side of caution and fertilize sparingly. Always observe the plant's response and adjust your fertilization routine accordingly. 

Hardiness Zone & More

The Lace Aloe is a cold-hardy plant and can tolerate mild frost in USDA zones 7 - 10. It can tolerate temperatures as low as 20°F but prefers temperatures between 50-80°F. If you live in a colder climate, you should put them in a pot, and they can then be kept outdoors during the summer and brought in as the temperature drops. 

In terms of humidity, the Lace Aloe is adaptable and can tolerate a wide range of humidity levels, but it generally prefers drier conditions. It's important to provide good airflow around the plant to prevent excessive humidity and reduce the risk of fungal diseases. If you're growing the Lace Aloe indoors, you can place it in a well-ventilated area or use a fan to improve air circulation. It is strongly advised that plants be shielded from cold, wet soil conditions in areas that experience a lot of winter and spring moisture (especially rain). 

Be sure to add Aloe aristata - Lace aloe plant to your collection today and elevate the beauty of your home or garden, with this stunning-looking plant. 

Bloom Season Summer
Botanical Name Aloe aristata (Aristaloe aristata)
Common Name Lace aloe, Guinea-fowl Aloe, torch plant
Dormancy Winter
Family Xanthorrhoeaceae
Flower Color Orange, red
Genus Aristaloe
Growth Habit Rosette
Growth Rate Slow
Hardiness Zone 7, 8, 9, 10
Mature Size 8 in. tall, 6 in. wide
Native Area South Africa
Plant Type Perennial succulent
Propagation By offsets, leaf cuttings
Resistance Drought tolerant, mild frost hardy, deer resistant
Soil PH 6.5, Acidic, Neutral
Soil Type specialized succulent potting mix
Special Features Lance shaped leaves
Sun Exposure Partial shade
Toxicity Safe for humans, dogs friendly, cats friendly
Watering Needs Low

Pests & Common Problems of Lace Aloe

The Lace Aloe, or Aloe Aristata, is generally a resilient plant, but it can still face a few common pests and problems. Here are some details: 

Mealybugs: The Lace Aloe's leaves and stems may become infested with these tiny, white, cottony insects. You can eliminate them by hand using a cotton swab coated in rubbing alcohol to battle them. As an alternative, you might use neem oil or insecticidal soap to get rid of the issue.

Scale insects: These pests appear as small, brown, or black bumps on the plant's leaves and stems. They can be removed by gently scraping them off with a soft brush or cloth. You can also use insecticidal soap or neem oil to treat the affected areas.

Root rot: Overwatering or poorly draining soil can lead to root rot in the Lace Aloe. To prevent this, make sure to allow the soil to dry out between waterings and use a well-draining soil mix. If root rot occurs, you may need to trim off the affected roots and repot the Aloe aristata in fresh soil.

Leaf spots: Fungal infections or excessive moisture can cause leaf spots on the Lace Aloe. To prevent this, avoid overhead watering and ensure good airflow around the plant. If leaf spots appear, you can remove the affected leaves and treat the aristaloe aristata plant with a fungicide if necessary.

Remember that proper watering, adequate airflow, and regular pest inspections are all part of aloe aristata care to keep it healthy and thriving. 

FAQs - Aloe Aristata Plant

Does lace aloe like full sun? 

The Lace Aloe thrives in bright, indirect light. While it can tolerate some direct sunlight for a short period, it generally prefers partial shade or filtered sunlight. Placing it near a window with bright, indirect light or providing it with a few hours of morning sun would be ideal.  

Avoid exposing it to intense, direct sunlight for extended periods, as it can lead to sunburn or leaf damage. 

Is lace aloe an indoor plant? 

Yes, the Lace Aloe can be grown as an indoor succulant. It is well-suited for indoor environments, as it can tolerate lower light conditions and is generally low maintenance. Just make sure to provide it with bright, indirect light and well-draining soil.  

When it comes to propagating lace aloe, you can either use offsets or leaf cuttings to grow new healthy plants.

How often do you water lace aloe? 

  Lace Aloe is a drought-tolerant succulent plant that prefers underwatering, as its large stems and lanceolate leaves store water. It's best to allow the soil to dry out between waterings. Water it thoroughly and then waits until the top inch of soil is dry before watering again.  

This usually translates to watering every 2-3 weeks, but it can vary depending on factors like temperature and humidity. Remember, it's always better to go underwater than overwater the Lace Aloe. To prevent root rot, allow soil to dry between waterings, water during active growing seasons, and check moisture levels before watering. 

 Is lace aloe the same as aloe vera plant? 

 No, lace aloe (Aloe aristata) is not the same as the aloe vera plant (Aloe vera). While both belong to the Aloe genus and share some similar characteristics, they are distinct species with different appearances and growth habits.  

Lace aloe plant leaves develop in little clumps approximating a rosette shape, as opposed to other aloe vera plants that can have long, spindly leaves. One of the few aloe species that may survive in cold climates is lace aloe.

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'Lace Aloe - Aloe aristata'

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6 reviews
Regular price$ 10.49
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Please note: All Landscape Ready plants that are in a 6-inch pot or larger WILL NOT come with a pot as it will be shipped bare root.

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Please note: Our large plants are many years old, and as a result, they might have minor scaring but will arrive 100% healthy and looking great.

Please note: Our large plants are shipped bare root. They are also many years old, and as a result, they might have minor scaring but will arrive healthy and looking great.

If you live in a cold climate and are expecting temperatures below 40 degrees within the next five days after placing your order, we highly recommend adding a heat pack to your order. If you do not order a heat pack, we do not send one with your order.

BUY HEAT PACKS HERE

**FREE HEAT PACK WITH ORDERS OVER $50 before taxes and shipping- BY REQUEST ONLY, PLEASE MAKE A NOTE ON YOUR ORDER.

To prevent plants from freezing while in transit, orders placed for areas with extreme severe freezing temperatures will be held for shipment until it is safe to ship.

Plants that are in 3.5" pots and smaller will be shipped in its pot to prevent any damage to the roots. Any plant that is 6" and larger WILL NOT come with a pot as it will be shipped bare root.

Depending on the species and season, you will receive a very similar plant to the one in the picture. It may or may not be blooming at the time of your purchase.

We ship via USPS Priority Mail, and we calculate the shipping cost based on the weight and volume of your purchase. Care instructions are included in every package you order. Please allow us up to 3 business days to process your order. Depending on your location, we will ship the plants on a certain day to avoid transit time during weekends or holidays. If you wish to receive your order on a specific date, or have special instructions, please add a note on your order. If you have any questions or comments, please feel free to contact us at any time.

  • Description
  • Key Plant Features

Are you ready for a succulent sensation that will set your heart ablaze? Look no further than the incredible Lace Aloe - Aloe aristata (Aristaloe aristata) is vibrant among the aloe genus! The Lace Aloe gets its name from the intricate, lacy patterns on its leaves. The scientific name of this low-growing perennial succulent, Aloe, is derived from the Arabic. The specific epithet aristata means "bearing bristles or a beard." It is sometimes also known as torch plant and Guinea-fowl Aloe.

This lace aloe is not just any ordinary houseplant; it's a compact, hardy succulent that has recently undergone reclassification. The lace aloe is grown primarily for its attractive succulent rosettes with yellow spots and white bumps on dark green leaves with lacy edges and soft white spines.

Hailing all the way from South Africa, the Aloe aristata can grow up to 8 inches tall and 6 inches wide. From wide bottoms to sharper points at the top, these leaves are pure perfection. This sun-loving Aloe aristata plant thrives on warmth and dryness; it's like having your very own sunshine-filled oasis indoors or outdoors in xeriscape landscapes. This frost-hardy wonder boasts leaves that mimic the elegance of Haworthia plants and grows at an astonishing pace.  

Under just the right conditions, these pollinator-friendly lace aloe plants bloom with tubular orange-red lace aloe flowers during the sizzling summer months, that attract both bees and hummingbirds alike talk about being irresistible to nature's most delightful creatures! Lace Aloe propagation can be achieved by offsets or leaf cuttings. Offsets are small plantlets that grow from the base of the mother plant. So why wait? Get ready for an enchanting adventure with our extraordinary Aloe aristata lace aloe!"

Watering Need

The Lace Aloe has moderate watering needs. It is a succulent plant that prefers to be underwatered rather than overwatered. Its large, fleshy succulent stems and lanceolate leaves store water for use during times of drought. It's pretty risky to feed it too much water because it doesn't require it because of this adaptation.

This will result in the water being in the soil for an extended period of time, which will be disastrous for the torch plant roots. So, it is important to allow the soil to dry out between waterings to prevent root rot. 

When watering, make sure to thoroughly saturate the soil and then allow it to completely dry before watering again. This Aloe plant is drought-tolerant and can withstand periods of dryness, so it's better to err on the side of underwatering. 

 In terms of frequency, during the active growing season (spring and summer), you can water the Lace Aloe every two to three weeks. However, during the dormant period (fall and winter), reduce watering to once a month or even less, as the lace aloe plant requires less moisture during this time. It's always a good idea to check the moisture level of the soil before watering to ensure it is dry.

Light Requirements

Aloe Aristata prefers bright, indirect light. It thrives in a location with plenty of natural sunlight, such as a south-facing window. However, it's important to protect the aloe aristata from intense, direct sunlight, as it can cause the leaves to become scorched. If you notice the leaves turning brown or yellow, it may be a sign that the aloe aristata plant is receiving too much light.

If you're growing the Lace Aloe indoors, you can place it near a window where it can receive bright, filtered light throughout the day. If your home doesn't receive much natural light, you can also use artificial grow lights to provide the necessary light for the plant's growth. Just make sure to position the lights a few feet away from the plant to prevent heat damage. 

Remember, finding the right balance of light is crucial for the health of the Lace Aloe. If the aristata lace aloe isn't receiving enough light, it may become leggy, and its growth may slow down. On the other hand, too much light can cause the leaves to become discolored or sunburned. Observing the Aloe aristata response to its current light conditions and making adjustments as needed will help ensure its well-being.

Optimal Soil & Fertilizer Needs

The Lace Aloe thrives in well-drained soil that mimics its natural habitat. A coarse sand or gritty soil mix is ideal for this succulent plant, as it allows excess water to drain away quickly and prevents the roots from sitting in soggy soil. Instead, simply mix garden soil or buy a well-draining potting mix, or ideally use our specialized succulent potting mix that contains 5 natural substrates and mycorrhizae to promote the development of a strong root system that helps your succulent to thrive.

When it comes to fertilizer, the aristaloe aristata Lace Aloe is not a heavy feeder. It can thrive in nutrient-poor soil, so you don't need to fertilize it frequently. During the growing season, which is typically in spring, you can apply a balanced natural fertilizer once a year.

However, it's important to note that succulents like the Lace Aloe are more prone to damage from overfertilization than underfertilization. Excessive fertilizer can lead to burnt roots and other issues. So, it's best to err on the side of caution and fertilize sparingly. Always observe the plant's response and adjust your fertilization routine accordingly. 

Hardiness Zone & More

The Lace Aloe is a cold-hardy plant and can tolerate mild frost in USDA zones 7 - 10. It can tolerate temperatures as low as 20°F but prefers temperatures between 50-80°F. If you live in a colder climate, you should put them in a pot, and they can then be kept outdoors during the summer and brought in as the temperature drops. 

In terms of humidity, the Lace Aloe is adaptable and can tolerate a wide range of humidity levels, but it generally prefers drier conditions. It's important to provide good airflow around the plant to prevent excessive humidity and reduce the risk of fungal diseases. If you're growing the Lace Aloe indoors, you can place it in a well-ventilated area or use a fan to improve air circulation. It is strongly advised that plants be shielded from cold, wet soil conditions in areas that experience a lot of winter and spring moisture (especially rain). 

Be sure to add Aloe aristata - Lace aloe plant to your collection today and elevate the beauty of your home or garden, with this stunning-looking plant. 

Bloom Season Summer
Botanical Name Aloe aristata (Aristaloe aristata)
Common Name Lace aloe, Guinea-fowl Aloe, torch plant
Dormancy Winter
Family Xanthorrhoeaceae
Flower Color Orange, red
Genus Aristaloe
Growth Habit Rosette
Growth Rate Slow
Hardiness Zone 7, 8, 9, 10
Mature Size 8 in. tall, 6 in. wide
Native Area South Africa
Plant Type Perennial succulent
Propagation By offsets, leaf cuttings
Resistance Drought tolerant, mild frost hardy, deer resistant
Soil PH 6.5, Acidic, Neutral
Soil Type specialized succulent potting mix
Special Features Lance shaped leaves
Sun Exposure Partial shade
Toxicity Safe for humans, dogs friendly, cats friendly
Watering Needs Low

Pests & Common Problems of Lace Aloe

The Lace Aloe, or Aloe Aristata, is generally a resilient plant, but it can still face a few common pests and problems. Here are some details: 

Mealybugs: The Lace Aloe's leaves and stems may become infested with these tiny, white, cottony insects. You can eliminate them by hand using a cotton swab coated in rubbing alcohol to battle them. As an alternative, you might use neem oil or insecticidal soap to get rid of the issue.

Scale insects: These pests appear as small, brown, or black bumps on the plant's leaves and stems. They can be removed by gently scraping them off with a soft brush or cloth. You can also use insecticidal soap or neem oil to treat the affected areas.

Root rot: Overwatering or poorly draining soil can lead to root rot in the Lace Aloe. To prevent this, make sure to allow the soil to dry out between waterings and use a well-draining soil mix. If root rot occurs, you may need to trim off the affected roots and repot the Aloe aristata in fresh soil.

Leaf spots: Fungal infections or excessive moisture can cause leaf spots on the Lace Aloe. To prevent this, avoid overhead watering and ensure good airflow around the plant. If leaf spots appear, you can remove the affected leaves and treat the aristaloe aristata plant with a fungicide if necessary.

Remember that proper watering, adequate airflow, and regular pest inspections are all part of aloe aristata care to keep it healthy and thriving. 

FAQs - Aloe Aristata Plant

Does lace aloe like full sun? 

The Lace Aloe thrives in bright, indirect light. While it can tolerate some direct sunlight for a short period, it generally prefers partial shade or filtered sunlight. Placing it near a window with bright, indirect light or providing it with a few hours of morning sun would be ideal.  

Avoid exposing it to intense, direct sunlight for extended periods, as it can lead to sunburn or leaf damage. 

Is lace aloe an indoor plant? 

Yes, the Lace Aloe can be grown as an indoor succulant. It is well-suited for indoor environments, as it can tolerate lower light conditions and is generally low maintenance. Just make sure to provide it with bright, indirect light and well-draining soil.  

When it comes to propagating lace aloe, you can either use offsets or leaf cuttings to grow new healthy plants.

How often do you water lace aloe? 

  Lace Aloe is a drought-tolerant succulent plant that prefers underwatering, as its large stems and lanceolate leaves store water. It's best to allow the soil to dry out between waterings. Water it thoroughly and then waits until the top inch of soil is dry before watering again.  

This usually translates to watering every 2-3 weeks, but it can vary depending on factors like temperature and humidity. Remember, it's always better to go underwater than overwater the Lace Aloe. To prevent root rot, allow soil to dry between waterings, water during active growing seasons, and check moisture levels before watering. 

 Is lace aloe the same as aloe vera plant? 

 No, lace aloe (Aloe aristata) is not the same as the aloe vera plant (Aloe vera). While both belong to the Aloe genus and share some similar characteristics, they are distinct species with different appearances and growth habits.  

Lace aloe plant leaves develop in little clumps approximating a rosette shape, as opposed to other aloe vera plants that can have long, spindly leaves. One of the few aloe species that may survive in cold climates is lace aloe.

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