Lady Fingers - Cotyledon orbiculata &
Lady Fingers - Cotyledon orbiculata &
Lady Fingers - Cotyledon orbiculata &
Lady Fingers - Cotyledon orbiculata &
Lady Fingers - Cotyledon orbiculata &
Lady Fingers - Cotyledon orbiculata &
Lady Fingers - Cotyledon orbiculata &
Lady Fingers - Cotyledon orbiculata &
Lady Fingers - Cotyledon orbiculata &
Lady Fingers - Cotyledon orbiculata &

Introducing the stunning succulent Lady Fingers, also known as Cotyledon orbiculata 'Oophylla' a rockstar of succulent subshrubs Cotyledon orbiculata! It is also known as lady's finger, pig's ear, and round-leaved navelwort. Hailing all the way from the vibrant coastal regions in South Africa, as well as southwestern Namibia.  

The lady's finger has branched stems and grey-green leaves that flaunt a white, waxy coating and a bold dark purple mark at their rounded tips; it knows how to make heads turn. This moderately fast-growing succulent 6 inches in height, spreads like wildfire into charming colonies that command attention.  

These opposite egg-shaped leaves, which can resemble the shape of a lady's fingers, earning it this popular nickname, become even more swoon-worthy when basking in full sun.  

During summer, clusters of stunning orange-red flowers on short, erect stalks appear alongside the succulent sensation's foliage, adding a burst of color that will make you breathless with delight.  

To encourage new growth, maintenance includes removing dried flowers and replanting every three years. All that needs to be done is to cut off the younger heads, remove the old growth, and replant. Like other members of the Crassulaceae family, Cotyledon orbiculata oophylla is not known to be toxic to humans and pets. 

Watering Needs 

Ladyfingers are a type of succulent that does not require much water. These cotyledons are adapted to survive in arid environments, so it's important to avoid overwatering them. Water them thoroughly, and then let the soil dry completely before watering again. During the growing season, which is generally from spring to fall, you can water them about once a week. In the winter, you can reduce watering to once every two to three weeks. 

Overwatering Cotyledon orbiculata can lead to root rot, which can be fatal to the plant. To avoid this, make sure to use well-drained soil and a pot with drainage holes to allow excess water to escape. It's also important to avoid getting water on the leaves or flowers of the lady finger succulent, as this can lead to fungal diseases. Instead, water the soil directly and allow the excess water to drain away. 

Light Requirements 

The lady's fingers require plenty of sunlight to thrive. This ladyfingers plant prefers bright, indirect light, so it's best to place them in a sunny spot or under grow lights if you're keeping them indoors. However, it's important to avoid exposing them to direct sunlight, which can cause their leaves to burn. If you notice that the leaves of your Cotyledon orbiculata oophylla ladyfingers are turning brown or yellow, it may be a sign that they're getting too much direct sunlight. 

In addition to sunlight, these cotyledon succulents also require a period of darkness each day to remain healthy. Make sure to provide them with at least 12 hours of darkness each day to allow them to rest and recover. If you're keeping them indoors, you can achieve this by placing them in a room that gets natural light during the day and turning off any artificial light sources at night.

Optimal Soil & Fertilizer Needs 

The lady fingers plant favors very airy, sandy soil that drains well. Planting them in ordinary soil will result in compacted roots, stunted growth, and most likely root rot. Instead, make or buy a well-draining potting mix, or ideally use our specialized succulent potting mix that contains 5 natural substrates and mycorrhizae to promote the development of a strong root system that helps your succulent to thrive. 

Natural fertilizers with an equal mixture of NPK (5-10-5) also last longer and keep your soil alive by adding other beneficial compounds and microbes that encourage plant health and nutrient absorption. So, skip those harsh chemicals and give your cotyledon succulent some love with some awesome natural fertilizer! 

Hardiness Zones & More 

The ladyfingers are hardy in USDA hardiness zones 9-11. These plants are adapted to warm, arid environments and are not tolerant of frost or freezing temperatures. If you live in a colder climate, you can still grow Cotyledon oophylla as indoor plants, as long as you provide them with plenty of sunlight and well-draining soil. 

In terms of temperature and humidity, these lady-finger plants prefer warm, dry conditions. They can tolerate temperatures between 50-80°F and prefer humidity levels between 30-50%. However, they are adapted to low-humidity environments and can survive in drier conditions as well. If you're keeping them indoors, it's important to avoid placing them near air conditioning vents or drafty windows, as this can cause their leaves to dry out. 

Give this Cotyledon orbiculata oophylla - Ladyfingers succulent a try if you're looking for an easy plant to care for!  

Bloom Season Summer
Botanical Name Cotyledon orbiculata 'Oophylla'
Common Name Lady finger
Dormancy Winter
Family Crassulaceae
Flower Color orange, red
Genus Cotyledon
Growth Habit Rosette
Growth Rate Moderate
Hardiness Zone 9, 10, 11
Mature Size 6 in. tall
Native Area South Africa
Plant Type Perennial succulent
Propagation By cuttings, seeds
Resistance Drought tolerant, heat resistant, pest resistant, deer resistant
Soil PH 6.5, Acidic, Neutral
Soil Type specialized succulent potting mix
Special Features Showy flowers
Sun Exposure Full sun, partial shade
Toxicity Safe for humans, friendly to dogs, friendly to cats
Watering Needs Low

Pests & Common Problems of Lady Fingers

The Ladyfingers are susceptible to a few common pests and problems. One common pest that affects a lady's fingers is the aphid. These tiny insects can cause stunted growth and leaf yellowing because they feed on the plant's sap.  

Another common problem is powdery mildew, a fungal disease that appears as a white powdery coating on the leaves and stems of the plant. It can weaken the plant and reduce its overall productivity. Ladyfingers are also susceptible to overwatering, which can cause the roots and stems to rot.

To avoid this problem, plant this cotyledon in well-draining soil and avoid watering it too frequently. 

FAQs - Lady Fingers Plant

How do you take care of lady fingers succulents? 

The ladyfingers are drought-tolerant houseplants that require well-draining soil, bright indirect light, and warm temperatures between 50-80°F.

They prefer a balanced, water-soluble fertilizer once a year during the growing season in the spring. Pruning is minimal, but removing dead or damaged leaves with sharp scissors can help maintain their health. These tips ensure a healthy and thriving Cotyledon orbiculata oophylla. 

Why is it called ladies finger? 

Cotyledon orbiculata oophylla, commonly known as "Lady Fingers," is named for the long, slender shape of its leaves, which can resemble the shape of a lady's fingers, hence earning it this popular nickname. This succulent is native to South Africa and is a member of the Crassulaceae family, which includes many other popular succulent plants.   

What is cotyledon Orbiculata used for? 

Cotyledon orbiculata, a plant in the Crassulaceae family, is used for various medicinal purposes, including treating skin sores, burns, and insect bites. Its leaves are used as poultices for wounds and topical skin treatments. In traditional medicine, Cotyledon orbiculata is also used to treat respiratory ailments like coughs and colds.

However, there is limited scientific evidence supporting its effectiveness in these applications. As with any herbal remedy, it's important to talk to your doctor before using Cotyledon orbiculata for medicinal purposes. 

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Lady Fingers - Cotyledon orbiculata 'Oophylla'

sku: 2350

Regular price$ 14.99
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Shipping calculated at checkout.

Size

Please note: All Landscape Ready plants that are in a 6-inch pot or larger WILL NOT come with a pot as it will be shipped bare root.

  • In stock, ready to ship
  • Inventory on the way

Please note: Our large plants are many years old, and as a result, they might have minor scaring but will arrive 100% healthy and looking great.

Please note: Our large plants are shipped bare root. They are also many years old, and as a result, they might have minor scaring but will arrive healthy and looking great.

If you live in a cold climate and are expecting temperatures below 40 degrees within the next five days after placing your order, we highly recommend adding a heat pack to your order. If you do not order a heat pack, we do not send one with your order.

BUY HEAT PACKS HERE

**FREE HEAT PACK WITH ORDERS OVER $50 before taxes and shipping- BY REQUEST ONLY, PLEASE MAKE A NOTE ON YOUR ORDER.

To prevent plants from freezing while in transit, orders placed for areas with extreme severe freezing temperatures will be held for shipment until it is safe to ship.

Plants that are in 3.5" pots and smaller will be shipped in its pot to prevent any damage to the roots. Any plant that is 6" and larger WILL NOT come with a pot as it will be shipped bare root.

Depending on the species and season, you will receive a very similar plant to the one in the picture. It may or may not be blooming at the time of your purchase.

We ship via USPS Priority Mail, and we calculate the shipping cost based on the weight and volume of your purchase. Care instructions are included in every package you order. Please allow us up to 3 business days to process your order. Depending on your location, we will ship the plants on a certain day to avoid transit time during weekends or holidays. If you wish to receive your order on a specific date, or have special instructions, please add a note on your order. If you have any questions or comments, please feel free to contact us at any time.

  • Description
  • Key Plant Features

Introducing the stunning succulent Lady Fingers, also known as Cotyledon orbiculata 'Oophylla' a rockstar of succulent subshrubs Cotyledon orbiculata! It is also known as lady's finger, pig's ear, and round-leaved navelwort. Hailing all the way from the vibrant coastal regions in South Africa, as well as southwestern Namibia.  

The lady's finger has branched stems and grey-green leaves that flaunt a white, waxy coating and a bold dark purple mark at their rounded tips; it knows how to make heads turn. This moderately fast-growing succulent 6 inches in height, spreads like wildfire into charming colonies that command attention.  

These opposite egg-shaped leaves, which can resemble the shape of a lady's fingers, earning it this popular nickname, become even more swoon-worthy when basking in full sun.  

During summer, clusters of stunning orange-red flowers on short, erect stalks appear alongside the succulent sensation's foliage, adding a burst of color that will make you breathless with delight.  

To encourage new growth, maintenance includes removing dried flowers and replanting every three years. All that needs to be done is to cut off the younger heads, remove the old growth, and replant. Like other members of the Crassulaceae family, Cotyledon orbiculata oophylla is not known to be toxic to humans and pets. 

Watering Needs 

Ladyfingers are a type of succulent that does not require much water. These cotyledons are adapted to survive in arid environments, so it's important to avoid overwatering them. Water them thoroughly, and then let the soil dry completely before watering again. During the growing season, which is generally from spring to fall, you can water them about once a week. In the winter, you can reduce watering to once every two to three weeks. 

Overwatering Cotyledon orbiculata can lead to root rot, which can be fatal to the plant. To avoid this, make sure to use well-drained soil and a pot with drainage holes to allow excess water to escape. It's also important to avoid getting water on the leaves or flowers of the lady finger succulent, as this can lead to fungal diseases. Instead, water the soil directly and allow the excess water to drain away. 

Light Requirements 

The lady's fingers require plenty of sunlight to thrive. This ladyfingers plant prefers bright, indirect light, so it's best to place them in a sunny spot or under grow lights if you're keeping them indoors. However, it's important to avoid exposing them to direct sunlight, which can cause their leaves to burn. If you notice that the leaves of your Cotyledon orbiculata oophylla ladyfingers are turning brown or yellow, it may be a sign that they're getting too much direct sunlight. 

In addition to sunlight, these cotyledon succulents also require a period of darkness each day to remain healthy. Make sure to provide them with at least 12 hours of darkness each day to allow them to rest and recover. If you're keeping them indoors, you can achieve this by placing them in a room that gets natural light during the day and turning off any artificial light sources at night.

Optimal Soil & Fertilizer Needs 

The lady fingers plant favors very airy, sandy soil that drains well. Planting them in ordinary soil will result in compacted roots, stunted growth, and most likely root rot. Instead, make or buy a well-draining potting mix, or ideally use our specialized succulent potting mix that contains 5 natural substrates and mycorrhizae to promote the development of a strong root system that helps your succulent to thrive. 

Natural fertilizers with an equal mixture of NPK (5-10-5) also last longer and keep your soil alive by adding other beneficial compounds and microbes that encourage plant health and nutrient absorption. So, skip those harsh chemicals and give your cotyledon succulent some love with some awesome natural fertilizer! 

Hardiness Zones & More 

The ladyfingers are hardy in USDA hardiness zones 9-11. These plants are adapted to warm, arid environments and are not tolerant of frost or freezing temperatures. If you live in a colder climate, you can still grow Cotyledon oophylla as indoor plants, as long as you provide them with plenty of sunlight and well-draining soil. 

In terms of temperature and humidity, these lady-finger plants prefer warm, dry conditions. They can tolerate temperatures between 50-80°F and prefer humidity levels between 30-50%. However, they are adapted to low-humidity environments and can survive in drier conditions as well. If you're keeping them indoors, it's important to avoid placing them near air conditioning vents or drafty windows, as this can cause their leaves to dry out. 

Give this Cotyledon orbiculata oophylla - Ladyfingers succulent a try if you're looking for an easy plant to care for!  

Bloom Season Summer
Botanical Name Cotyledon orbiculata 'Oophylla'
Common Name Lady finger
Dormancy Winter
Family Crassulaceae
Flower Color orange, red
Genus Cotyledon
Growth Habit Rosette
Growth Rate Moderate
Hardiness Zone 9, 10, 11
Mature Size 6 in. tall
Native Area South Africa
Plant Type Perennial succulent
Propagation By cuttings, seeds
Resistance Drought tolerant, heat resistant, pest resistant, deer resistant
Soil PH 6.5, Acidic, Neutral
Soil Type specialized succulent potting mix
Special Features Showy flowers
Sun Exposure Full sun, partial shade
Toxicity Safe for humans, friendly to dogs, friendly to cats
Watering Needs Low

Pests & Common Problems of Lady Fingers

The Ladyfingers are susceptible to a few common pests and problems. One common pest that affects a lady's fingers is the aphid. These tiny insects can cause stunted growth and leaf yellowing because they feed on the plant's sap.  

Another common problem is powdery mildew, a fungal disease that appears as a white powdery coating on the leaves and stems of the plant. It can weaken the plant and reduce its overall productivity. Ladyfingers are also susceptible to overwatering, which can cause the roots and stems to rot.

To avoid this problem, plant this cotyledon in well-draining soil and avoid watering it too frequently. 

FAQs - Lady Fingers Plant

How do you take care of lady fingers succulents? 

The ladyfingers are drought-tolerant houseplants that require well-draining soil, bright indirect light, and warm temperatures between 50-80°F.

They prefer a balanced, water-soluble fertilizer once a year during the growing season in the spring. Pruning is minimal, but removing dead or damaged leaves with sharp scissors can help maintain their health. These tips ensure a healthy and thriving Cotyledon orbiculata oophylla. 

Why is it called ladies finger? 

Cotyledon orbiculata oophylla, commonly known as "Lady Fingers," is named for the long, slender shape of its leaves, which can resemble the shape of a lady's fingers, hence earning it this popular nickname. This succulent is native to South Africa and is a member of the Crassulaceae family, which includes many other popular succulent plants.   

What is cotyledon Orbiculata used for? 

Cotyledon orbiculata, a plant in the Crassulaceae family, is used for various medicinal purposes, including treating skin sores, burns, and insect bites. Its leaves are used as poultices for wounds and topical skin treatments. In traditional medicine, Cotyledon orbiculata is also used to treat respiratory ailments like coughs and colds.

However, there is limited scientific evidence supporting its effectiveness in these applications. As with any herbal remedy, it's important to talk to your doctor before using Cotyledon orbiculata for medicinal purposes. 

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