Madagascar ocotillo &
Madagascar ocotillo &
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Madagascar ocotillo &
Madagascar ocotillo &
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Madagascar ocotillo &
Madagascar ocotillo &
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Introducing the Madagascar ocotillo plant, also known as Alluaudia procera. The Madagascar ocotillo is a unique species of the striking Alluaudia genus that belongs to the family Didiereaceae. It is native to the arid regions of Madagascar and is also known as African ocotillo or Madagascan ocotillo.

The Madagascar ocotillo Alluaudia procera, is often referred to as the "false ocotillo" because of its striking resemblance to the Fouquieria splendens. The Madagascar ocotillo is a stunning succulent known for its unique leaves and columnar stem that can grow up to 25 feet tall. Its rounded succulent leaves and grey spines create a captivating visual appeal. 

The stems of the Madagascar ocotillo are covered in sharp thorns, which act as a defense mechanism against animals and help to conserve water. Some Madagascar ocotillo greyish-green stems occasionally fork off in a pendulous direction before curving back upwards.It takes several years for young Alluaudia procera to form a tangle of stems; during that time, a strong central stem develops.

The leaves sprout up from the main stem itself, which is mostly unbranched and grows upright. This gives the branches of the ocotillo plant an elegant and statuesque appearance. The Madagascar ocotillo has the ability to shed its leaves during periods of drought. This adaptation helps the Alluaudia procera conserve water and survive in their harsh natural habitat. When water becomes scarce, the leaves turn yellow and drop off the branches, allowing them to redirect their resources to the stems and roots.

The flowers of the Madagascar ocotillo are small, inconspicuous, and typically greenish-yellow in color, arranged in clusters along the stem. While the flowers themselves may not be showy, they do add a delicate touch to the overall appearance of your Alluaudia procera. The main attraction of the Madagascar ocotillo lies in its unique succulent leaves and tall, spiny stems. So, while the flowers may not steal the spotlight, the plant as a whole is still a stunning sight to behold!

Watering Needs

When it comes to watering the Madagascar ocotillo, it's important to strike the right balance. This unique drought-deciduous Madagascar ocotillo is well-adapted to arid conditions, so it prefers infrequent but deep watering. 

During the growing season, which is typically spring and summer, you can water your Alluaudia procera sparingly. Allow the soil to dry out between waterings to prevent overwatering, as this succulent plant is drought-tolerant. It's best to water it thoroughly, making sure the water reaches the roots, and then let the soil dry out before watering again. 

In the winter months, when your Alluaudia procera goes into a period of dormancy, it's important to reduce watering even further. The Madagascar ocotillo naturally experiences a long dry season in its native habitat, so it's best to mimic those conditions. Only water it when the soil is completely dry, and be cautious not to overwater during this dormant period. 

Remember, the key is to provide enough water to keep your plants, Alluaudia procera Madagascar Ocotillo, healthy without causing waterlogged soil. Observing your succulents closely and adjusting watering based on their needs is always a good practice. 

Light Requirements 

When it comes to the light requirements of the Madagascar ocotillo, it loves basking in the sun! If you're growing the Madagascar ocotillo indoors, place it near a sunny window where it can receive at least 6 hours of bright, indirect light daily. You can also supplement its light needs with artificial grow lights if necessary, especially during the winter months when natural sunlight may be limited.  

If you are growing it outdoors, your Alluaudia procera thrives in full sun to partial shade for at least 6–8 hours daily, so it's best to place it in a spot where it can soak up those rays. The more sunlight it gets, the happier it will be! 

Since the Madagascar ocotillo is native to arid regions, it has adapted to withstand intense sunlight and high temperatures. So, don't be afraid to give it all the sunshine it needs. Just make sure to protect the older stems of your Alluaudia procera from extreme heatwaves or scorching afternoon sun, as it may cause sunburn on its delicate stems. 

Optimal Soil & Fertilizer Needs 

The Madagascar ocotillo prefers a well-draining soil mix that mimics its native arid habitat. The Madagascar ocotillo favors a very airy, sandy, well-drained soil mix that mimics its native arid habitat. Planting them in ordinary soil will result in compacted roots, stunted growth, and, most likely, root rot. Instead, make or buy a well-draining potting mix, or ideally, use our specialized succulent potting mix that contains 5 natural substrates and mycorrhizae to promote the development of a strong root system that helps your Alluaudia procera succulent to thrive. 

When it comes to fertilizing, the Madagascar ocotillo doesn't require frequent or heavy feeding. A balanced, slow-release fertilizer with low proportions of nitrogen and potassium (5-10-5) is a good choice. You can apply the fertilizer during the growing season, which is typically spring, following the instructions for the correct dosage. 

Remember, it's important not to over-fertilize the Madagascar ocotillo plants, as it can lead to excessive growth and weak stems. A light feeding once a year should be sufficient to keep the tiny male and female plants in your Alluaudia procera healthy and happy. 

Hardiness Zone & More 

When growing your Madagascar ocotillo indoors, it can tolerate temperatures well; it thrives in average room temperatures between 65°F and 75°F. The Alluaudia procera can tolerate slightly cooler temperatures during the winter months, but it's best to avoid exposing it to temperatures below 50°F. 

In terms of humidity, the Madagascar ocotillo is adaptable and can tolerate a range of humidity levels. It can handle average indoor humidity, but it also appreciates a slightly drier environment. Aim for a humidity level of around 40% to 60%, which is comfortable for most indoor spaces. 

Alluaudia procera is native to arid regions of Madagascar and is suitable for outdoor cultivation in USDA hardiness zones 9 to 11. These zones generally experience mild to warm temperatures throughout the year, with minimal frost or freezing conditions. 

If you're located in a colder region outside of these hardiness zones, you can still enjoy the Madagascar ocotillo as a beautiful indoor plant. Just make sure to provide it with the right temperature and humidity conditions indoors to keep it happy and healthy. 

Alluaudia procera Propagation 

Propagation of the Alluaudia procera Madagascar ocotillo cactus can be done through stem cuttings to encourage branching. Simply take a cutting from a healthy stem, let it dry for a few days to form a callus, and then plant it in well-draining soil. With proper care and the right conditions, you can enjoy the beauty of this unique cactus-like plant in your own garden. 

The Bottom Line 

Overall, the Alluaudia procera, also known as the Madagascar ocotillo or the false ocotillo, is a remarkable succulent plant with rounded succulent leaves, grey spines, and an upright, mostly unbranched stem. Alluaudia procera has its own unique charm and characteristics that make it a standout addition to any space. Its striking appearance and ability to thrive in arid conditions make it a popular choice among succulent enthusiasts. So, if you're looking for a captivating and low-maintenance plant, Alluaudia procera might just be the perfect choice for you! 

Bloom Season Late spring, mid summer
Botanical Name Alluaudia procera
Common Name Madagascar ocotillo
Dormancy Winter
Family Didiereaceae
Flower Color Gold, yellowish-white
Genus Alluaudia
Growth Habit Columnar
Growth Rate Fast
Hardiness Zone 9, 10, 11, 12
Mature Size Up to 25 ft. tall
Native Area Madagascar
Plant Type Branched succulent
Propagation By stem cuttings
Resistance Drought tolerant, pest resistance, heat resistance
Soil PH 6.5, Acidic, Neutral
Soil Type Succulents potting mix soil
Special Features Columnar plant with vertical stem
Sun Exposure Full sun, partial shade
Toxicity Toxic to humans, toxic to pets
Watering Needs Moderate

Common Pests & Problems of Alluaudia procera

Alluaudia procera-Madagascar ocotillo is a unique succulent tree that can face several common pests and problems. Here are the most common are: 

Spider mites: These tiny pests can infest the leaves and stems of small succulent trees, causing discoloration and webbing. Regularly inspect your succulent plant and use a gentle spray of water or insecticidal soap to control them. 

Mealybugs: These white, cottony insects can cluster on the Madagascar ocotillo, especially in the leaf axils. Remove them manually or use insecticidal soap or neem oil to eliminate them. 

Root rot: Overwatering or poorly draining soil can lead to root rot, which can cause the Alluaudia procera roots to decay. Ensure that the soil is well-drained and avoid overwatering to prevent this issue. 

Stem rot: Excessive moisture or high humidity can contribute to stem rot, which causes the stems to become mushy and black. Ensure good air circulation and avoid overwatering to prevent this problem. 

Leaf drop: Sudden changes in temperature, inadequate light, or overwatering can cause leaf drop in the Madagascar ocotillo. Maintain stable temperature and lighting conditions, and water the Alluaudia procera only when the top inch of soil in the new pot is dry. 

Remember, prevention is key! Regularly inspect your Alluaudia procera for signs of pests or problems and provide it with the proper care and conditions to keep it healthy and thriving. If you notice any issues, take action promptly to address them.

FAQs - Alluaudia procera Plant

Does Alluaudia procera lose the Leaves? 

The Alluaudia procera is a deciduous plant, which means that it does lose its leaves seasonally. During the winter dormant month, the Madagascar ocotillo may shed all its leaves as part of its natural growth cycle.  

However, it's important to note that the timing and duration of leaf loss can vary depending on factors such as climate and growing conditions. When the leaves are shed, their unique stems and spines become more prominent, adding to their visual appeal. So, don't be surprised if you see the Alluaudia procera without leaves during certain times of the year! 

How do you care for Alluaudia procera indoors? 

To care for Alluaudia procera indoors, there are a few key things to keep in mind. First, make sure to place your Madagascar ocotillo in high interior lighting with bright, indirect sunlight for at least 6 hours.  

Additionally, provide well-drained soil and water your succulent thoroughly, allowing the soil to dry out between waterings and freely circulating air. Overwatering can lead to root rot, so it's important to find the right balance.  

Maintain a warm temperature between 65-85°F and provide occasional misting to increase humidity. With these care tips, your Alluaudia procera should thrive and bring beauty to your indoor space! 

How big do Alluaudia procera get? 

Alluaudia procera can be grown both indoors and outdoors. When grown indoors, they may not reach their full height potential because of limited space and sunlight. Outdoors, in suitable conditions, they can grow to their full height of about 25 feet tall. However, it's important to note that they thrive best in warm, arid climates. So, if you have the space and proper conditions, you can enjoy the magnificent growth of Alluaudia procera both indoors and outdoors!  

How fast does Madagascar Ocotillo grow? 

The Madagascar Ocotillo, or Alluaudia procera, is known for its relatively fast growth rate compared to other cacti. It grows between 2 feet each season, even at the coast, and develops into spectacular specimens of elevated branches stretching out into the sky.  

However, it's important to keep in mind that the growth rate can vary depending on factors such as bright sunlight, warm temperatures and minimal water availability. So, with a little patience and proper care, you can witness the impressive growth of the Madagascar Ocotillo! 

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Madagascar ocotillo 'Alluaudia procera'

sku: 2333

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Regular price$ 30.49
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Size
Height:
Diameter:
Height: 8"-10"
Diameter:
Height: 25" - 27"
Diameter:
Height: 32" - 34"
Diameter:
Height: 55" - 60"
Diameter:
Height: 70"-80"
Diameter:

Please note: All Landscape Ready plants that are in a 6-inch pot or larger WILL NOT come with a pot as it will be shipped bare root.

  • In stock, ready to ship
  • Inventory on the way

Please note: Our large plants are many years old, and as a result, they might have minor scaring but will arrive 100% healthy and looking great.

Please note: Our large plants are shipped bare root. They are also many years old, and as a result, they might have minor scaring but will arrive healthy and looking great.

If you live in a cold climate and are expecting temperatures below 40 degrees within the next five days after placing your order, we highly recommend adding a heat pack to your order. If you do not order a heat pack, we do not send one with your order.

BUY HEAT PACKS HERE

**FREE HEAT PACK WITH ORDERS OVER $50 before taxes and shipping- BY REQUEST ONLY, PLEASE MAKE A NOTE ON YOUR ORDER.

To prevent plants from freezing while in transit, orders placed for areas with extreme severe freezing temperatures will be held for shipment until it is safe to ship.

Plants that are in 3.5" pots and smaller will be shipped in its pot to prevent any damage to the roots. Any plant that is 6" and larger WILL NOT come with a pot as it will be shipped bare root.

Depending on the species and season, you will receive a very similar plant to the one in the picture. It may or may not be blooming at the time of your purchase.

We ship via USPS Priority Mail, and we calculate the shipping cost based on the weight and volume of your purchase. Care instructions are included in every package you order. Please allow us up to 3 business days to process your order. Depending on your location, we will ship the plants on a certain day to avoid transit time during weekends or holidays. If you wish to receive your order on a specific date, or have special instructions, please add a note on your order. If you have any questions or comments, please feel free to contact us at any time.

  • Description
  • Key Plant Features

Introducing the Madagascar ocotillo plant, also known as Alluaudia procera. The Madagascar ocotillo is a unique species of the striking Alluaudia genus that belongs to the family Didiereaceae. It is native to the arid regions of Madagascar and is also known as African ocotillo or Madagascan ocotillo.

The Madagascar ocotillo Alluaudia procera, is often referred to as the "false ocotillo" because of its striking resemblance to the Fouquieria splendens. The Madagascar ocotillo is a stunning succulent known for its unique leaves and columnar stem that can grow up to 25 feet tall. Its rounded succulent leaves and grey spines create a captivating visual appeal. 

The stems of the Madagascar ocotillo are covered in sharp thorns, which act as a defense mechanism against animals and help to conserve water. Some Madagascar ocotillo greyish-green stems occasionally fork off in a pendulous direction before curving back upwards.It takes several years for young Alluaudia procera to form a tangle of stems; during that time, a strong central stem develops.

The leaves sprout up from the main stem itself, which is mostly unbranched and grows upright. This gives the branches of the ocotillo plant an elegant and statuesque appearance. The Madagascar ocotillo has the ability to shed its leaves during periods of drought. This adaptation helps the Alluaudia procera conserve water and survive in their harsh natural habitat. When water becomes scarce, the leaves turn yellow and drop off the branches, allowing them to redirect their resources to the stems and roots.

The flowers of the Madagascar ocotillo are small, inconspicuous, and typically greenish-yellow in color, arranged in clusters along the stem. While the flowers themselves may not be showy, they do add a delicate touch to the overall appearance of your Alluaudia procera. The main attraction of the Madagascar ocotillo lies in its unique succulent leaves and tall, spiny stems. So, while the flowers may not steal the spotlight, the plant as a whole is still a stunning sight to behold!

Watering Needs

When it comes to watering the Madagascar ocotillo, it's important to strike the right balance. This unique drought-deciduous Madagascar ocotillo is well-adapted to arid conditions, so it prefers infrequent but deep watering. 

During the growing season, which is typically spring and summer, you can water your Alluaudia procera sparingly. Allow the soil to dry out between waterings to prevent overwatering, as this succulent plant is drought-tolerant. It's best to water it thoroughly, making sure the water reaches the roots, and then let the soil dry out before watering again. 

In the winter months, when your Alluaudia procera goes into a period of dormancy, it's important to reduce watering even further. The Madagascar ocotillo naturally experiences a long dry season in its native habitat, so it's best to mimic those conditions. Only water it when the soil is completely dry, and be cautious not to overwater during this dormant period. 

Remember, the key is to provide enough water to keep your plants, Alluaudia procera Madagascar Ocotillo, healthy without causing waterlogged soil. Observing your succulents closely and adjusting watering based on their needs is always a good practice. 

Light Requirements 

When it comes to the light requirements of the Madagascar ocotillo, it loves basking in the sun! If you're growing the Madagascar ocotillo indoors, place it near a sunny window where it can receive at least 6 hours of bright, indirect light daily. You can also supplement its light needs with artificial grow lights if necessary, especially during the winter months when natural sunlight may be limited.  

If you are growing it outdoors, your Alluaudia procera thrives in full sun to partial shade for at least 6–8 hours daily, so it's best to place it in a spot where it can soak up those rays. The more sunlight it gets, the happier it will be! 

Since the Madagascar ocotillo is native to arid regions, it has adapted to withstand intense sunlight and high temperatures. So, don't be afraid to give it all the sunshine it needs. Just make sure to protect the older stems of your Alluaudia procera from extreme heatwaves or scorching afternoon sun, as it may cause sunburn on its delicate stems. 

Optimal Soil & Fertilizer Needs 

The Madagascar ocotillo prefers a well-draining soil mix that mimics its native arid habitat. The Madagascar ocotillo favors a very airy, sandy, well-drained soil mix that mimics its native arid habitat. Planting them in ordinary soil will result in compacted roots, stunted growth, and, most likely, root rot. Instead, make or buy a well-draining potting mix, or ideally, use our specialized succulent potting mix that contains 5 natural substrates and mycorrhizae to promote the development of a strong root system that helps your Alluaudia procera succulent to thrive. 

When it comes to fertilizing, the Madagascar ocotillo doesn't require frequent or heavy feeding. A balanced, slow-release fertilizer with low proportions of nitrogen and potassium (5-10-5) is a good choice. You can apply the fertilizer during the growing season, which is typically spring, following the instructions for the correct dosage. 

Remember, it's important not to over-fertilize the Madagascar ocotillo plants, as it can lead to excessive growth and weak stems. A light feeding once a year should be sufficient to keep the tiny male and female plants in your Alluaudia procera healthy and happy. 

Hardiness Zone & More 

When growing your Madagascar ocotillo indoors, it can tolerate temperatures well; it thrives in average room temperatures between 65°F and 75°F. The Alluaudia procera can tolerate slightly cooler temperatures during the winter months, but it's best to avoid exposing it to temperatures below 50°F. 

In terms of humidity, the Madagascar ocotillo is adaptable and can tolerate a range of humidity levels. It can handle average indoor humidity, but it also appreciates a slightly drier environment. Aim for a humidity level of around 40% to 60%, which is comfortable for most indoor spaces. 

Alluaudia procera is native to arid regions of Madagascar and is suitable for outdoor cultivation in USDA hardiness zones 9 to 11. These zones generally experience mild to warm temperatures throughout the year, with minimal frost or freezing conditions. 

If you're located in a colder region outside of these hardiness zones, you can still enjoy the Madagascar ocotillo as a beautiful indoor plant. Just make sure to provide it with the right temperature and humidity conditions indoors to keep it happy and healthy. 

Alluaudia procera Propagation 

Propagation of the Alluaudia procera Madagascar ocotillo cactus can be done through stem cuttings to encourage branching. Simply take a cutting from a healthy stem, let it dry for a few days to form a callus, and then plant it in well-draining soil. With proper care and the right conditions, you can enjoy the beauty of this unique cactus-like plant in your own garden. 

The Bottom Line 

Overall, the Alluaudia procera, also known as the Madagascar ocotillo or the false ocotillo, is a remarkable succulent plant with rounded succulent leaves, grey spines, and an upright, mostly unbranched stem. Alluaudia procera has its own unique charm and characteristics that make it a standout addition to any space. Its striking appearance and ability to thrive in arid conditions make it a popular choice among succulent enthusiasts. So, if you're looking for a captivating and low-maintenance plant, Alluaudia procera might just be the perfect choice for you! 

Bloom Season Late spring, mid summer
Botanical Name Alluaudia procera
Common Name Madagascar ocotillo
Dormancy Winter
Family Didiereaceae
Flower Color Gold, yellowish-white
Genus Alluaudia
Growth Habit Columnar
Growth Rate Fast
Hardiness Zone 9, 10, 11, 12
Mature Size Up to 25 ft. tall
Native Area Madagascar
Plant Type Branched succulent
Propagation By stem cuttings
Resistance Drought tolerant, pest resistance, heat resistance
Soil PH 6.5, Acidic, Neutral
Soil Type Succulents potting mix soil
Special Features Columnar plant with vertical stem
Sun Exposure Full sun, partial shade
Toxicity Toxic to humans, toxic to pets
Watering Needs Moderate

Common Pests & Problems of Alluaudia procera

Alluaudia procera-Madagascar ocotillo is a unique succulent tree that can face several common pests and problems. Here are the most common are: 

Spider mites: These tiny pests can infest the leaves and stems of small succulent trees, causing discoloration and webbing. Regularly inspect your succulent plant and use a gentle spray of water or insecticidal soap to control them. 

Mealybugs: These white, cottony insects can cluster on the Madagascar ocotillo, especially in the leaf axils. Remove them manually or use insecticidal soap or neem oil to eliminate them. 

Root rot: Overwatering or poorly draining soil can lead to root rot, which can cause the Alluaudia procera roots to decay. Ensure that the soil is well-drained and avoid overwatering to prevent this issue. 

Stem rot: Excessive moisture or high humidity can contribute to stem rot, which causes the stems to become mushy and black. Ensure good air circulation and avoid overwatering to prevent this problem. 

Leaf drop: Sudden changes in temperature, inadequate light, or overwatering can cause leaf drop in the Madagascar ocotillo. Maintain stable temperature and lighting conditions, and water the Alluaudia procera only when the top inch of soil in the new pot is dry. 

Remember, prevention is key! Regularly inspect your Alluaudia procera for signs of pests or problems and provide it with the proper care and conditions to keep it healthy and thriving. If you notice any issues, take action promptly to address them.

FAQs - Alluaudia procera Plant

Does Alluaudia procera lose the Leaves? 

The Alluaudia procera is a deciduous plant, which means that it does lose its leaves seasonally. During the winter dormant month, the Madagascar ocotillo may shed all its leaves as part of its natural growth cycle.  

However, it's important to note that the timing and duration of leaf loss can vary depending on factors such as climate and growing conditions. When the leaves are shed, their unique stems and spines become more prominent, adding to their visual appeal. So, don't be surprised if you see the Alluaudia procera without leaves during certain times of the year! 

How do you care for Alluaudia procera indoors? 

To care for Alluaudia procera indoors, there are a few key things to keep in mind. First, make sure to place your Madagascar ocotillo in high interior lighting with bright, indirect sunlight for at least 6 hours.  

Additionally, provide well-drained soil and water your succulent thoroughly, allowing the soil to dry out between waterings and freely circulating air. Overwatering can lead to root rot, so it's important to find the right balance.  

Maintain a warm temperature between 65-85°F and provide occasional misting to increase humidity. With these care tips, your Alluaudia procera should thrive and bring beauty to your indoor space! 

How big do Alluaudia procera get? 

Alluaudia procera can be grown both indoors and outdoors. When grown indoors, they may not reach their full height potential because of limited space and sunlight. Outdoors, in suitable conditions, they can grow to their full height of about 25 feet tall. However, it's important to note that they thrive best in warm, arid climates. So, if you have the space and proper conditions, you can enjoy the magnificent growth of Alluaudia procera both indoors and outdoors!  

How fast does Madagascar Ocotillo grow? 

The Madagascar Ocotillo, or Alluaudia procera, is known for its relatively fast growth rate compared to other cacti. It grows between 2 feet each season, even at the coast, and develops into spectacular specimens of elevated branches stretching out into the sky.  

However, it's important to keep in mind that the growth rate can vary depending on factors such as bright sunlight, warm temperatures and minimal water availability. So, with a little patience and proper care, you can witness the impressive growth of the Madagascar Ocotillo! 

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