Madagascar Palm Plant - Pachypodium lamerei -1
Madagascar Palm Plant - Pachypodium lamerei - 6
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Madagascar Palm Plant - Pachypodium lamerei -2
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Madagascar Palm Plant - Pachypodium lamerei - 9
Madagascar Palm Plant - Pachypodium lamerei -10
Madagascar Palm Plant - Pachypodium lamerei -11
Madagascar Palm Plant - Pachypodium lamerei -12
Madagascar Palm Plant - Pachypodium lamerei -13
Madagascar Palm Plant - Pachypodium lamerei -14
Madagascar Palm Plant - Pachypodium lamerei -15
Madagascar Palm Plant - Pachypodium lamerei -16
Madagascar Palm Plant - Pachypodium lamerei -17
Madagascar Palm Plant - Pachypodium lamerei
Madagascar Palm Plant - Pachypodium lamerei
Madagascar Palm Plant - Pachypodium lamerei
Madagascar Palm Plant - Pachypodium lamerei
Madagascar Palm Plant - Pachypodium lamerei
Madagascar Palm Plant - Pachypodium lamerei
Madagascar Palm Plant - Pachypodium lamerei
Madagascar Palm Plant - Pachypodium lamerei
Madagascar Palm Plant - Pachypodium lamerei
Madagascar Palm Plant - Pachypodium lamerei
Madagascar Palm Plant - Pachypodium lamerei
Madagascar Palm Plant - Pachypodium lamerei
Madagascar Palm Plant - Pachypodium lamerei
Madagascar Palm Plant - Pachypodium lamerei
Madagascar Palm Plant - Pachypodium lamerei
Madagascar Palm Plant - Pachypodium lamerei
Madagascar Palm Plant - Pachypodium lamerei
Madagascar Palm Plant - Pachypodium lamerei
Madagascar Palm Plant - Pachypodium lamerei
Madagascar Palm Plant - Pachypodium lamerei
Madagascar Palm Plant - Pachypodium lamerei
Madagascar Palm Plant - Pachypodium lamerei
Madagascar Palm Plant - Pachypodium lamerei
Madagascar Palm Plant - Pachypodium lamerei
Madagascar Palm Plant - Pachypodium lamerei
Madagascar Palm Plant - Pachypodium lamerei
Madagascar Palm Plant - Pachypodium lamerei
Madagascar Palm Plant - Pachypodium lamerei
Madagascar Palm Plant - Pachypodium lamerei

If you are looking for a stunning and unique addition to your plant collection, then look no further than the Madagascar palm, also known as Pachypodium lamerei. This unusual Pachypodium lamerei is sure to spark conversation with its adorable, grey-green leaves and eye-catching white flowers. Madagascar palm is actually succulent, not a true palm, despite popular belief. 

Pachypodium, which means "thick foot," refers to the plant's thick, swollen stem, which stores water and provides structure and strength to the Madagascar Palm. There are several species, but the two most common are Pachypodium lamerei and Pachypodium geayi.   

Native to Southwest Madagascar, your Pachypodium lamerei Madagascar Palms can reach 24 feet tall and 8 feet wide at maturity and are sure to make a statement wherever they're planted.

The trumpet-shaped flowers of the Madagascar Palm Pachypodium lamerei, add a touch of exotic beauty to any space from late spring to summer. During this bloom time, you can expect to see clusters of vibrant, white, yellow, red, pink, or cream-colored flowers with a delightful fragrance. Outdoor Madagascar palms are more likely to produce flowers than indoor ones, so use NPK fertilizer in the early spring and prune damaged branches for better blooming.

However, it's crucial to remember that this Pachypodium lamerei madagascar palm plant's sap is mildly toxic to both humans and pets if consumed, so handle it with care! 

So, if you're seeking to add a little bit of flair to your indoor or outdoor space, then read on to learn more about the stunning Madagascar palm tree.

Watering Needs 

The Madagascar palm succulent needs moderate watering, especially during its first season in a new planting container. These succulents need regular watering to keep the soil moist but not too wet.

Overwatering should be avoided at all costs, as the Madagascar palm is highly vulnerable to root rot if kept in constantly damp soil. It's important to allow the soil to completely dry out between each watering, and if you're unsure whether it's time for another drink, err on the side of caution and give it some extra time.

Although desert succulents can survive months without water, pay close attention to this little plant's specific watering needs, and you'll be able to keep your drought-tolerant Madagascar palm healthy and happy for years to come!

Light Requirements 

When growing your Madagascar palm Pachypodium lamerei indoors, it prefers bright, indirect light. Placing it near a window where it can receive plenty of filtered sunlight is ideal. However, be cautious when placing it in direct sunlight, as it can scorch the leaves. If you notice the leaves turning yellow or brown, it may be a sign that the plant is receiving too much direct sunlight.

If you're growing your Madagascar palm outdoors, it is important to grow Pachypodium species in areas that receive at least 4-6 hours of bright, direct light every day to keep them happy. New plants can get burned in the full sun as they were probably grown in a greenhouse; therefore, gradually increase their exposure to sunlight.

Remember, like most succulents, the Madagascar palm requires plenty of sun exposure and should be grown in either full sun or partial shade.  If the sun is too bright and is burning your plant's leaves, consider purchasing a sunshade or moving the plant to a more shaded location.

Optimal soil & Fertilizers Needs 

Are you ready to take your Madagascar palm plant game to the next level?  When it comes to choosing the right soil and fertilizers for your adorable succulent, you need to be extra cautious and use the right kind of soil mix and a container with drainage holes to prevent root rot. Moisture can be a real killer, leading to root and stem rot in no time. But fear not, my fellow green thumbs! Planet Desert has got your back with our specialized potting mix that includes organic mycorrhizae, perfect for promoting healthy roots and happy Madagascar palm plants.

When it comes to fertilizing your Pachypodium lamerei, remember that less is more. A small amount of organic fertilizer once a year in the spring will do wonders for your plant's health and growth. Using organic fertilizers with an approximate blend of 5-10-5 (NPK) that is higher in phosphorus than nitrogen also ensures that other beneficial compounds and microbes are added to the soil without the use of harsh chemicals. Show your Madagascar palm some love with awesome natural fertilizer and watch it thrive.

A little goes a long way!

Hardiness Zone & More 

If growing indoors, this Pachypodium lamerei prefers a warm environment, ideally between 65°F and 80°F. It can tolerate slightly cooler temperatures, but it's best to avoid drafts or extreme temperature fluctuations.

If you live in USDA zones 9–11 year-round, you can grow your Madagascar palm outdoors. These zones generally experience mild winters with temperatures ranging from 30°F to 40°F and above. However, if you live in a region with colder temperatures, you can still enjoy this plant by growing it in a container and bringing it indoors during the winter months.

Madagascar palms are hardy plants that can tolerate a wide range of temperatures and humidity levels. Native to the arid regions of Madagascar, in their natural habitat, they are well-suited to dry, desert-like conditions.

Propagating the Pachypodium lamerei Madagascar Palm 

To propagate Madagascar palm Pachypodium lamerei, one common method is by stem cuttings. You can take a stem cutting from a healthy, mature plant, let it dry for a few days to form a callus, and then plant it in well-draining soil.

Another method is propagation by seeds. You can collect the seeds from a mature Madagascar palm and sow them in a suitable potting mix. Keep the soil slightly moist and provide warmth and a bright, indirect, sunny spot for germination. Both methods require some patience and care, but with a little bit of love, you can successfully propagate your own Madagascar palms.

The Bottom Line

Overall, the Madagascar Palm (Pachypodium lamerei) is a fascinating succulent plant native to Madagascar. It has a tall, slender trunk and spiky leaves, making it quite a unique addition to any succulent collection. It thrives outdoors in USDA zones 10–11, where temperatures range from 30°F to 40°F and above. This Pachypodium lamerei madagascar loves dry and warm climates, so it's important to provide it with plenty of sunlight and well-draining soil. Don't miss out on adding the Pachypodium lamerei Madagascar Palm to your garden! Order now, and you will be able to enjoy its beauty for many years to come.


Bloom Season Spring, early summer
Bloom Season Summer
Botanical Name Pachypodium lamerei
Common Name Madagascar palm
Common Name Madagascar palm plant, Madagascar plant
Dormancy Winter
Family Apocynaceae
Flower Color White
Genus Pachypodium
Growth Habit Columnar/tree
Growth Rate Fast
Growth Rate Fast (Outdoor), Slow (Indoor)
Hardiness Zone 9, 10, 11
Mature Size 20 ft tall (Outdoor), 4 ft 6 ft tall 9 (Indoor)
Mature Size 4 in. tall, 90 in. wide
Native Area Western Madagascar
Plant Type Shrubby succulents
Plant Type Spiny semideciduous succulent
Propagation By Offsets, seeds
Propagation By stem cuttings
Resistance Drought tolerant, deer resistant, pest resistant
Resistance Drought tolerant, Pest and disease resistance
Soil PH 6.5, Acidic, Neutral
Soil Type Succulent potting mix soil
Special Features Noticeable palm tree shape
Special Features Thick Spinebearing metallic silver trunk
Sun Exposure Full sun, Brightdirect light, Light shade
Sun Exposure Full sun, partial shade
Toxicity Toxic for humans, toxic for pets
Watering Needs Moderate

Pest & Common Problems of Madagascar Palm

The Madagascar Palm is susceptible to aphids while flowering, however, this Pachypodium lamerei species is comparatively disease-resistant. Insecticidal soaps can be used to get rid of whiteflies, so be on high alert for them. Remove the damaged parts of this succulent plant if it displays symptoms of a severe pest infestation. 

An indoor or outdoor Madagascar palm may appoint a few fungi-related diseases, such as leaf spot, southern blight, powdery mildew, botrytis (grey mold), leaf rust, and leaf spot (a soilborne fungus). 

Use fungicides to address fungus problems as soon as you notice them. Alternatively, you could treat a Madagascar palm plant indoors with a homemade fungal solution made from water and baking soda. Watch out for a lance nematode-related soilborne illness that can cause root rot in Madagascar palms that are kept inside or outside. 

Madagascar Palm FAQs

How long does a Madagascar Palm take to grow? 

Indoor plants like the Madagascar palm grow 6 to 12 inches on average per year. They might grow even taller and wider, exceeding 6 feet and beyond, if you have the right conditions and plenty of light! 

Where is the best place to plant a Madagascar palm? 

These plants thrive in direct sunlight and flourish in hot, arid areas of the landscape. The Madagascar palm prefers Zone 10, but in warmer parts of Zone 9, you can keep it in a pot to bring indoors during cold spells or plant it in a protected area and cover it during cold nights. The Madagascar palm is moderately cold-tolerant. 

Are Madagascar Palm leaves poisonous? 

Yes, the leaves of the Madagascar palm are poisonous and can irritate the skin or cause gastrointestinal problems if ingested but slightly touching them is safe. It is crucial to keep them away from children and animals.   

Why are my Madagascar palm's leaves falling off?

Leaf drop in Madagascar palms can be caused by improper watering, inadequate lighting, and temperature fluctuations. Overwatering or underwatering can cause stress, while inadequate lighting can cause the plant to shed leaves. Temperature fluctuations and drafts can also cause leaf drops. Addressing these issues can help restore the plant's health and prevent further leaf drop.

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Madagascar Palm Plant - Pachypodium lamerei

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Regular price$ 14.99
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Size
Height:
Diameter:
Height: 5"-7"
Diameter:
Height: 11"-15"
Diameter:
Height: 16"-20"
Diameter:
Height: 22"-30"
Diameter:
Height: 32"-38"
Diameter:

Please note: All Landscape Ready plants that are in a 6-inch pot or larger WILL NOT come with a pot as it will be shipped bare root.

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  • Inventory on the way

Please note: Our large plants are many years old, and as a result, they might have minor scaring but will arrive 100% healthy and looking great.

Please note: Our large plants are shipped bare root. They are also many years old, and as a result, they might have minor scaring but will arrive healthy and looking great.

If you live in a cold climate and are expecting temperatures below 40 degrees within the next five days after placing your order, we highly recommend adding a heat pack to your order. If you do not order a heat pack, we do not send one with your order.

BUY HEAT PACKS HERE

**FREE HEAT PACK WITH ORDERS OVER $50 before taxes and shipping- BY REQUEST ONLY, PLEASE MAKE A NOTE ON YOUR ORDER.

To prevent plants from freezing while in transit, orders placed for areas with extreme severe freezing temperatures will be held for shipment until it is safe to ship.

Plants that are in 3.5" pots and smaller will be shipped in its pot to prevent any damage to the roots. Any plant that is 6" and larger WILL NOT come with a pot as it will be shipped bare root.

Depending on the species and season, you will receive a very similar plant to the one in the picture. It may or may not be blooming at the time of your purchase.

We ship via USPS Priority Mail, and we calculate the shipping cost based on the weight and volume of your purchase. Care instructions are included in every package you order. Please allow us up to 3 business days to process your order. Depending on your location, we will ship the plants on a certain day to avoid transit time during weekends or holidays. If you wish to receive your order on a specific date, or have special instructions, please add a note on your order. If you have any questions or comments, please feel free to contact us at any time.

  • Description
  • Key Plant Features

If you are looking for a stunning and unique addition to your plant collection, then look no further than the Madagascar palm, also known as Pachypodium lamerei. This unusual Pachypodium lamerei is sure to spark conversation with its adorable, grey-green leaves and eye-catching white flowers. Madagascar palm is actually succulent, not a true palm, despite popular belief. 

Pachypodium, which means "thick foot," refers to the plant's thick, swollen stem, which stores water and provides structure and strength to the Madagascar Palm. There are several species, but the two most common are Pachypodium lamerei and Pachypodium geayi.   

Native to Southwest Madagascar, your Pachypodium lamerei Madagascar Palms can reach 24 feet tall and 8 feet wide at maturity and are sure to make a statement wherever they're planted.

The trumpet-shaped flowers of the Madagascar Palm Pachypodium lamerei, add a touch of exotic beauty to any space from late spring to summer. During this bloom time, you can expect to see clusters of vibrant, white, yellow, red, pink, or cream-colored flowers with a delightful fragrance. Outdoor Madagascar palms are more likely to produce flowers than indoor ones, so use NPK fertilizer in the early spring and prune damaged branches for better blooming.

However, it's crucial to remember that this Pachypodium lamerei madagascar palm plant's sap is mildly toxic to both humans and pets if consumed, so handle it with care! 

So, if you're seeking to add a little bit of flair to your indoor or outdoor space, then read on to learn more about the stunning Madagascar palm tree.

Watering Needs 

The Madagascar palm succulent needs moderate watering, especially during its first season in a new planting container. These succulents need regular watering to keep the soil moist but not too wet.

Overwatering should be avoided at all costs, as the Madagascar palm is highly vulnerable to root rot if kept in constantly damp soil. It's important to allow the soil to completely dry out between each watering, and if you're unsure whether it's time for another drink, err on the side of caution and give it some extra time.

Although desert succulents can survive months without water, pay close attention to this little plant's specific watering needs, and you'll be able to keep your drought-tolerant Madagascar palm healthy and happy for years to come!

Light Requirements 

When growing your Madagascar palm Pachypodium lamerei indoors, it prefers bright, indirect light. Placing it near a window where it can receive plenty of filtered sunlight is ideal. However, be cautious when placing it in direct sunlight, as it can scorch the leaves. If you notice the leaves turning yellow or brown, it may be a sign that the plant is receiving too much direct sunlight.

If you're growing your Madagascar palm outdoors, it is important to grow Pachypodium species in areas that receive at least 4-6 hours of bright, direct light every day to keep them happy. New plants can get burned in the full sun as they were probably grown in a greenhouse; therefore, gradually increase their exposure to sunlight.

Remember, like most succulents, the Madagascar palm requires plenty of sun exposure and should be grown in either full sun or partial shade.  If the sun is too bright and is burning your plant's leaves, consider purchasing a sunshade or moving the plant to a more shaded location.

Optimal soil & Fertilizers Needs 

Are you ready to take your Madagascar palm plant game to the next level?  When it comes to choosing the right soil and fertilizers for your adorable succulent, you need to be extra cautious and use the right kind of soil mix and a container with drainage holes to prevent root rot. Moisture can be a real killer, leading to root and stem rot in no time. But fear not, my fellow green thumbs! Planet Desert has got your back with our specialized potting mix that includes organic mycorrhizae, perfect for promoting healthy roots and happy Madagascar palm plants.

When it comes to fertilizing your Pachypodium lamerei, remember that less is more. A small amount of organic fertilizer once a year in the spring will do wonders for your plant's health and growth. Using organic fertilizers with an approximate blend of 5-10-5 (NPK) that is higher in phosphorus than nitrogen also ensures that other beneficial compounds and microbes are added to the soil without the use of harsh chemicals. Show your Madagascar palm some love with awesome natural fertilizer and watch it thrive.

A little goes a long way!

Hardiness Zone & More 

If growing indoors, this Pachypodium lamerei prefers a warm environment, ideally between 65°F and 80°F. It can tolerate slightly cooler temperatures, but it's best to avoid drafts or extreme temperature fluctuations.

If you live in USDA zones 9–11 year-round, you can grow your Madagascar palm outdoors. These zones generally experience mild winters with temperatures ranging from 30°F to 40°F and above. However, if you live in a region with colder temperatures, you can still enjoy this plant by growing it in a container and bringing it indoors during the winter months.

Madagascar palms are hardy plants that can tolerate a wide range of temperatures and humidity levels. Native to the arid regions of Madagascar, in their natural habitat, they are well-suited to dry, desert-like conditions.

Propagating the Pachypodium lamerei Madagascar Palm 

To propagate Madagascar palm Pachypodium lamerei, one common method is by stem cuttings. You can take a stem cutting from a healthy, mature plant, let it dry for a few days to form a callus, and then plant it in well-draining soil.

Another method is propagation by seeds. You can collect the seeds from a mature Madagascar palm and sow them in a suitable potting mix. Keep the soil slightly moist and provide warmth and a bright, indirect, sunny spot for germination. Both methods require some patience and care, but with a little bit of love, you can successfully propagate your own Madagascar palms.

The Bottom Line

Overall, the Madagascar Palm (Pachypodium lamerei) is a fascinating succulent plant native to Madagascar. It has a tall, slender trunk and spiky leaves, making it quite a unique addition to any succulent collection. It thrives outdoors in USDA zones 10–11, where temperatures range from 30°F to 40°F and above. This Pachypodium lamerei madagascar loves dry and warm climates, so it's important to provide it with plenty of sunlight and well-draining soil. Don't miss out on adding the Pachypodium lamerei Madagascar Palm to your garden! Order now, and you will be able to enjoy its beauty for many years to come.


Bloom Season Spring, early summer
Bloom Season Summer
Botanical Name Pachypodium lamerei
Common Name Madagascar palm
Common Name Madagascar palm plant, Madagascar plant
Dormancy Winter
Family Apocynaceae
Flower Color White
Genus Pachypodium
Growth Habit Columnar/tree
Growth Rate Fast
Growth Rate Fast (Outdoor), Slow (Indoor)
Hardiness Zone 9, 10, 11
Mature Size 20 ft tall (Outdoor), 4 ft 6 ft tall 9 (Indoor)
Mature Size 4 in. tall, 90 in. wide
Native Area Western Madagascar
Plant Type Shrubby succulents
Plant Type Spiny semideciduous succulent
Propagation By Offsets, seeds
Propagation By stem cuttings
Resistance Drought tolerant, deer resistant, pest resistant
Resistance Drought tolerant, Pest and disease resistance
Soil PH 6.5, Acidic, Neutral
Soil Type Succulent potting mix soil
Special Features Noticeable palm tree shape
Special Features Thick Spinebearing metallic silver trunk
Sun Exposure Full sun, Brightdirect light, Light shade
Sun Exposure Full sun, partial shade
Toxicity Toxic for humans, toxic for pets
Watering Needs Moderate

Pest & Common Problems of Madagascar Palm

The Madagascar Palm is susceptible to aphids while flowering, however, this Pachypodium lamerei species is comparatively disease-resistant. Insecticidal soaps can be used to get rid of whiteflies, so be on high alert for them. Remove the damaged parts of this succulent plant if it displays symptoms of a severe pest infestation. 

An indoor or outdoor Madagascar palm may appoint a few fungi-related diseases, such as leaf spot, southern blight, powdery mildew, botrytis (grey mold), leaf rust, and leaf spot (a soilborne fungus). 

Use fungicides to address fungus problems as soon as you notice them. Alternatively, you could treat a Madagascar palm plant indoors with a homemade fungal solution made from water and baking soda. Watch out for a lance nematode-related soilborne illness that can cause root rot in Madagascar palms that are kept inside or outside. 

Madagascar Palm FAQs

How long does a Madagascar Palm take to grow? 

Indoor plants like the Madagascar palm grow 6 to 12 inches on average per year. They might grow even taller and wider, exceeding 6 feet and beyond, if you have the right conditions and plenty of light! 

Where is the best place to plant a Madagascar palm? 

These plants thrive in direct sunlight and flourish in hot, arid areas of the landscape. The Madagascar palm prefers Zone 10, but in warmer parts of Zone 9, you can keep it in a pot to bring indoors during cold spells or plant it in a protected area and cover it during cold nights. The Madagascar palm is moderately cold-tolerant. 

Are Madagascar Palm leaves poisonous? 

Yes, the leaves of the Madagascar palm are poisonous and can irritate the skin or cause gastrointestinal problems if ingested but slightly touching them is safe. It is crucial to keep them away from children and animals.   

Why are my Madagascar palm's leaves falling off?

Leaf drop in Madagascar palms can be caused by improper watering, inadequate lighting, and temperature fluctuations. Overwatering or underwatering can cause stress, while inadequate lighting can cause the plant to shed leaves. Temperature fluctuations and drafts can also cause leaf drops. Addressing these issues can help restore the plant's health and prevent further leaf drop.

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