Mother of Thousands Plant &
Mother of Thousands Plant &
Mother of Thousands Plant &
Mother of Thousands Plant &
Mother of Thousands Plant &
Mother of Thousands Plant &
Mother of Thousands Plant &
Mother of Thousands Plant &
Mother of Thousands Plant &
Mother of Thousands Plant &
Mother of Thousands Plant &
Mother of Thousands Plant &
Mother of Thousands Plant &
Mother of Thousands Plant &
Mother of Thousands Plant &
Mother of Thousands Plant &
Mother of Thousands Plant &
Mother of Thousands Plant &
Mother of Thousands Plant &

Introducing the mother of thousands plants, scientifically known as Kalanchoe laetivirens, is a fascinating succulent from the Kalanchoe genus that is native to Madagascar. It has several other common names, such as Alligator Plant, Mexican Hat Plant, and Devil's Backbone. 

The mother of thousands gets its name from its unique ability to produce a lot of plantlets along the edges of its leaves. These plantlets, also known as "baby plantlets" or "pups," are miniature versions of the mother plant and can easily drop off and take root in the surrounding soil, giving rise to new plants.  

Most people confuse the Kalanchoe plants because of their similarities, but the name "mother of thousands" (Kalanchoe laetivirens) refers to the tiny plantlets that develop along the edges of its leaves, whereas "mother of millions" (Kalanchoe delagoensis) produces plantlets on the tips of its leaves. There's even a hybrid called Kalanchoe houghtonii that combines the features of both plants. It's like a wonderful Kalanchoe family reunion! 

The leaves of this monocarpic mother-of-thousand plant are thick and fleshy, with an attractive grayish-green color. They are often adorned with small, reddish-brown spots or markings, adding to the Kalanchoe plant's visual appeal. The mother-of-thousand succulent has an upright growth habit and can reach a height of up to 3 feet, making it a striking addition to any indoor or outdoor space. 

The flowers of the mother of thousands plants are small, tubular, and bell-shaped. They are typically pinkish-grey in color and can appear in clusters on tall stalks. The flowering season for this mother-of-thousand plant is usually in late winter or early spring, and the flowers can last for several weeks. When grown indoors, it rarely blooms. 

Mothers of thousands are considered to be mildly toxic to pets and humans if ingested. It contains compounds that can cause gastrointestinal discomfort. It's always best to keep it out of reach of curious pets and children. 

You can propagate your alligator plant through its small plantlets. Pick two or three plantlets from the leaves and propagate them properly. The plant does not require any pruning other than the removal of dead stalks and dropped plantlets. It's like a little plant factory!  

It's worth noting that while the Kalanchoe daigremontiana mother-of-thousand plant can be a delightful addition to your plant collection, it can also be considered invasive in some regions. The plantlets it produces can spread easily and take over if not properly managed. So, if you decide to grow this plant, it's important to be mindful of its potential to become invasive and take appropriate measures to control its growth.

Watering Needs 

Just like its closely related Kalanchoe plant, the mother of millions, this succulent is also adapted to arid conditions and is drought tolerant. Mother of thousands needs water at room temperature. Extreme cold or freezing temperatures or extremely hot water damages the roots of your Kalanchoe laetivirens. 

To keep your mother of thousands happy, allow the soil to dry out completely between waterings. Stick your finger about an inch into the soil, and if it feels dry, then it's time to give it a good drink. Remember to use well-drained soil and a pot with good drainage and holes to prevent water from pooling and causing root rot. 

During the cooler months or when the plant is in a dormant phase, you can reduce the frequency of watering even further. These succulents are built to store water in their leaves, so they can handle dry spells better than excessive moisture. 

Light Requirements 

The mother of thousands loves bright, indirect sunlight. It thrives in a spot where it can soak up plenty of light throughout 4-6 hours of the day. Find a sunny east-facing window or a well-lit area in your home for your Kalanchoe mother-of-thousand succulent to bask in the sunshine. 

However, be careful not to expose the mother of thousands to direct sunlight for extended periods, as it can scorch its leaves. So, a balance of bright, indirect light is ideal for this plant's growth and health. 

Remember, finding the right lighting conditions will help your mother-of-thousand plant flourish and showcase its unique characteristics! 

Optimal Soil & Fertilizers

When it comes to the soil and fertilizer needs of the mother-of-thousand plant, here's what you need to know!

For soil, the mother of thousands prefers well-draining potting soil that allows excess water to flow away. Instead of using the peat-moss-based soil, make or buy a well-draining potting mix, or ideally use our specialized succulent potting mix that contains 5 natural substrates and mycorrhizae to promote the development of a strong root system that helps your succulent to thrive. 

As for fertilizing, the mother of thousands doesn't require frequent feeding. You can use a balanced, natural NPK fertilizer with an equal ratio of about (5-10-5) during the growing season, which is typically spring. 

Remember, it's always best to under-fertilize rather than over-fertilize succulents like the mother of thousands. Too much fertilizer can cause salt buildup and harm the plant. So, a light feeding every few months should be sufficient to keep your plant happy and thriving! 

Hardiness Zone & More 

Typically grown in hot, arid desert regions, the mother of Thousands plants thrive indoors in warm, dry surroundings. Only in hotter climates, such as Florida and Hawaii, can the slow-growing mother of thousands be grown outside. 

 If you live in USDA regions 9 to 11, you can also grow this particular plant outdoors year-round, but they are not frost-tolerant, so you should plant them indoors or put them in a pot and move them indoors during the winter if you live outside of these regions. Keep your Kalanchoe laetivirens away from cold, drafty windows and air vents if you are growing it indoors in a cold climate. 

As for humidity, this Kalanchoe mother-of-thousands succulent grows wherever it can tolerate a range of levels, but it's important to provide good air circulation. While household humidity is generally good enough, these mother-of-thousand succulents will do even better with some extra moisture in the air. Set up a humidifier nearby or grow them in naturally humid rooms like your bathroom or kitchen. 

Give it a try and enjoy the beauty and intrigue this unique Kalanchoe laetivirens mother of thousands brings to your home or garden! You can find out more information about the difference between the Mothers of Thousands and the Mothers of Millions right here on Planet Desert. 

Bloom Season Late winter, early spring
Botanical Name Kalanchoe laetivirens
Common Name Mother of thousands, Alligator Plant, Mexican Hat Plant, Devil's Backbone
Dormancy Fall, winter
Family Crassulaceae
Flower Color Pinkish-grey
Genus Kalanchoe
Growth Habit Erect, Multibranched
Growth Rate Slow
Hardiness Zone 9, 10, 11
Mature Size 3.3 feet
Native Area Madagascar
Plant Type Perennial Succulent
Propagation By seeds, cuttings
Resistance Drought tolerant, heat tolerant, pest resistant
Soil PH 6.5, Acidic, Neutral
Soil Type specialized succulent potting mix
Special Features Easy to maintain
Sun Exposure Full sun, Partial sunlight
Toxicity Mildly toxic to humans, mildly toxic to pets(Keep away from children)
Watering Needs Low

Pests & Common Problems of Mother of Thousands

Like other succulent species, this mother-of-thousands plant can be a beautiful addition to any indoor or outdoor garden. It is not immune to pests and common problems. 

Overwatering: Giving the plant too much moisture can lead to root rot. It's important to let the soil dry out between waterings to prevent this. Don't forget to place this succulent in a terracotta pot with a drainage hole. This will reduce the chances of overwatering. 

Pests Infestation: Mealybugs and aphids can sometimes bug the mother of thousands. These little critters can suck the sap from the plant and cause damage. You can get rid of them by gently wiping the leaves with a cloth soaked in a mild soapy water solution. 

Sunburn: Too much direct sunlight can cause the leaf margins and tiny plantlets to turn yellow or wilt. It's best to provide some shade or indirect light to keep other plants around your plant happy. 

Leggy Growth: If the mother of thousands doesn't get enough light, it can become leggy and stretch out. Make sure it gets enough bright, indirect light to keep it compact and bushy. 

With a little bit of care and attention, you can help your mother of thousands and other Kalanchoe species overcome these common problems and thrive! 

FAQs - Mother of Thousands Plants 

  

Is the mother of thousands poisonous? 

The mother of thousands (Kalanchoe laetivirens) is considered to be mildly toxic to pets and humans if ingested. It's always best to keep it out of reach of curious pets and children.

How do you care for Kalanchoe laetivirens? 

To take care of the Kalanchoe laetivirens (mother of thousands), make sure it gets plenty of bright, indirect sunlight. Water it when the soil is dry, but be careful not to overwater as it can lead to root rot. It prefers temperatures between 60°F and 85°F, so keep it away from extreme cold or hot temperatures. 

You can grow them outdoors in USDA zones 9-11. Use well-drained succulent soil and propagate it by removing the baby plantlets and planting them in a separate pot. With a little love and attention, your mother of thousands will thrive! 

Is the mother of a thousand an indoor or outdoor plant? 

The Kalanchoe laetivirens, commonly called mother of thousands can be grown both indoors and outdoors, depending on your preference and climate. It can thrive indoors with bright, indirect sunlight or outdoors in well-draining soil and a suitable climate.

Is the mother of thousands rare? 

The mother of thousands (Kalanchoe laetivirens) is actually quite common and can be found in many places. It's a popular succulent that many people enjoy growing because of its unique growth habit and interesting appearance.  

So, you won't have any trouble finding one if you're looking to add it to your plant collection!

What is the difference between a mother of thousands and mother of millions? 

The difference between a mother of thousands and a mother of millions is mainly in their scientific names and some slight variations in appearance. The Mother of Thousands, also known as Kalanchoe laetivirens, has leaves that produce baby plantlets along their edges, giving it a "thousand" effect.  

The Mother of Millions, also known as Kalanchoe delagoense, produces baby plantlets on the tips of its leaves, hence the "millions" name.   

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Mother of Thousands Plant 'Kalanchoe laetivirens'

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Regular price$ 9.97
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Please note: All Landscape Ready plants that are in a 6-inch pot or larger WILL NOT come with a pot as it will be shipped bare root.

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Please note: Our large plants are many years old, and as a result, they might have minor scaring but will arrive 100% healthy and looking great.

Please note: Our large plants are shipped bare root. They are also many years old, and as a result, they might have minor scaring but will arrive healthy and looking great.

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Detailed description of this plant is below...

If you live in a cold climate and are expecting temperatures below 40 degrees within the next five days after placing your order, we highly recommend adding a heat pack to your order. If you do not order a heat pack, we do not send one with your order.

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To prevent plants from freezing while in transit, orders placed for areas with extreme severe freezing temperatures will be held for shipment until it is safe to ship.

FREE SHIPPING ON ALL ORDERS OVER $89 in the
Continental US.

Plants that are in 3.5" pots and smaller will be shipped in its pot to prevent any damage to the roots.

Any plant that is 6" and larger WILL NOT come with a pot as it will be shipped bare root.

Depending on the species and season, you will receive a very similar plant to the one in the picture. It may or may not be blooming at the time of your purchase.

We ship via USPS Priority Mail, If you don't get Free Shipping, then we calculate the shipping cost based on the weight and volume of your purchase.

Care instructions are included in every package you order. Please allow us up to 3 business days to process your order. Depending on your location, we will ship the plants on a certain day to avoid transit time during weekends or holidays. If you wish to receive your order on a specific date, or have special instructions, please add a note on your order. If you have any questions or comments, please feel free to contact us at any time.

  • Description
  • Key Plant Features

Introducing the mother of thousands plants, scientifically known as Kalanchoe laetivirens, is a fascinating succulent from the Kalanchoe genus that is native to Madagascar. It has several other common names, such as Alligator Plant, Mexican Hat Plant, and Devil's Backbone. 

The mother of thousands gets its name from its unique ability to produce a lot of plantlets along the edges of its leaves. These plantlets, also known as "baby plantlets" or "pups," are miniature versions of the mother plant and can easily drop off and take root in the surrounding soil, giving rise to new plants.  

Most people confuse the Kalanchoe plants because of their similarities, but the name "mother of thousands" (Kalanchoe laetivirens) refers to the tiny plantlets that develop along the edges of its leaves, whereas "mother of millions" (Kalanchoe delagoensis) produces plantlets on the tips of its leaves. There's even a hybrid called Kalanchoe houghtonii that combines the features of both plants. It's like a wonderful Kalanchoe family reunion! 

The leaves of this monocarpic mother-of-thousand plant are thick and fleshy, with an attractive grayish-green color. They are often adorned with small, reddish-brown spots or markings, adding to the Kalanchoe plant's visual appeal. The mother-of-thousand succulent has an upright growth habit and can reach a height of up to 3 feet, making it a striking addition to any indoor or outdoor space. 

The flowers of the mother of thousands plants are small, tubular, and bell-shaped. They are typically pinkish-grey in color and can appear in clusters on tall stalks. The flowering season for this mother-of-thousand plant is usually in late winter or early spring, and the flowers can last for several weeks. When grown indoors, it rarely blooms. 

Mothers of thousands are considered to be mildly toxic to pets and humans if ingested. It contains compounds that can cause gastrointestinal discomfort. It's always best to keep it out of reach of curious pets and children. 

You can propagate your alligator plant through its small plantlets. Pick two or three plantlets from the leaves and propagate them properly. The plant does not require any pruning other than the removal of dead stalks and dropped plantlets. It's like a little plant factory!  

It's worth noting that while the Kalanchoe daigremontiana mother-of-thousand plant can be a delightful addition to your plant collection, it can also be considered invasive in some regions. The plantlets it produces can spread easily and take over if not properly managed. So, if you decide to grow this plant, it's important to be mindful of its potential to become invasive and take appropriate measures to control its growth.

Watering Needs 

Just like its closely related Kalanchoe plant, the mother of millions, this succulent is also adapted to arid conditions and is drought tolerant. Mother of thousands needs water at room temperature. Extreme cold or freezing temperatures or extremely hot water damages the roots of your Kalanchoe laetivirens. 

To keep your mother of thousands happy, allow the soil to dry out completely between waterings. Stick your finger about an inch into the soil, and if it feels dry, then it's time to give it a good drink. Remember to use well-drained soil and a pot with good drainage and holes to prevent water from pooling and causing root rot. 

During the cooler months or when the plant is in a dormant phase, you can reduce the frequency of watering even further. These succulents are built to store water in their leaves, so they can handle dry spells better than excessive moisture. 

Light Requirements 

The mother of thousands loves bright, indirect sunlight. It thrives in a spot where it can soak up plenty of light throughout 4-6 hours of the day. Find a sunny east-facing window or a well-lit area in your home for your Kalanchoe mother-of-thousand succulent to bask in the sunshine. 

However, be careful not to expose the mother of thousands to direct sunlight for extended periods, as it can scorch its leaves. So, a balance of bright, indirect light is ideal for this plant's growth and health. 

Remember, finding the right lighting conditions will help your mother-of-thousand plant flourish and showcase its unique characteristics! 

Optimal Soil & Fertilizers

When it comes to the soil and fertilizer needs of the mother-of-thousand plant, here's what you need to know!

For soil, the mother of thousands prefers well-draining potting soil that allows excess water to flow away. Instead of using the peat-moss-based soil, make or buy a well-draining potting mix, or ideally use our specialized succulent potting mix that contains 5 natural substrates and mycorrhizae to promote the development of a strong root system that helps your succulent to thrive. 

As for fertilizing, the mother of thousands doesn't require frequent feeding. You can use a balanced, natural NPK fertilizer with an equal ratio of about (5-10-5) during the growing season, which is typically spring. 

Remember, it's always best to under-fertilize rather than over-fertilize succulents like the mother of thousands. Too much fertilizer can cause salt buildup and harm the plant. So, a light feeding every few months should be sufficient to keep your plant happy and thriving! 

Hardiness Zone & More 

Typically grown in hot, arid desert regions, the mother of Thousands plants thrive indoors in warm, dry surroundings. Only in hotter climates, such as Florida and Hawaii, can the slow-growing mother of thousands be grown outside. 

 If you live in USDA regions 9 to 11, you can also grow this particular plant outdoors year-round, but they are not frost-tolerant, so you should plant them indoors or put them in a pot and move them indoors during the winter if you live outside of these regions. Keep your Kalanchoe laetivirens away from cold, drafty windows and air vents if you are growing it indoors in a cold climate. 

As for humidity, this Kalanchoe mother-of-thousands succulent grows wherever it can tolerate a range of levels, but it's important to provide good air circulation. While household humidity is generally good enough, these mother-of-thousand succulents will do even better with some extra moisture in the air. Set up a humidifier nearby or grow them in naturally humid rooms like your bathroom or kitchen. 

Give it a try and enjoy the beauty and intrigue this unique Kalanchoe laetivirens mother of thousands brings to your home or garden! You can find out more information about the difference between the Mothers of Thousands and the Mothers of Millions right here on Planet Desert. 

Bloom Season Late winter, early spring
Botanical Name Kalanchoe laetivirens
Common Name Mother of thousands, Alligator Plant, Mexican Hat Plant, Devil's Backbone
Dormancy Fall, winter
Family Crassulaceae
Flower Color Pinkish-grey
Genus Kalanchoe
Growth Habit Erect, Multibranched
Growth Rate Slow
Hardiness Zone 9, 10, 11
Mature Size 3.3 feet
Native Area Madagascar
Plant Type Perennial Succulent
Propagation By seeds, cuttings
Resistance Drought tolerant, heat tolerant, pest resistant
Soil PH 6.5, Acidic, Neutral
Soil Type specialized succulent potting mix
Special Features Easy to maintain
Sun Exposure Full sun, Partial sunlight
Toxicity Mildly toxic to humans, mildly toxic to pets(Keep away from children)
Watering Needs Low

Pests & Common Problems of Mother of Thousands

Like other succulent species, this mother-of-thousands plant can be a beautiful addition to any indoor or outdoor garden. It is not immune to pests and common problems. 

Overwatering: Giving the plant too much moisture can lead to root rot. It's important to let the soil dry out between waterings to prevent this. Don't forget to place this succulent in a terracotta pot with a drainage hole. This will reduce the chances of overwatering. 

Pests Infestation: Mealybugs and aphids can sometimes bug the mother of thousands. These little critters can suck the sap from the plant and cause damage. You can get rid of them by gently wiping the leaves with a cloth soaked in a mild soapy water solution. 

Sunburn: Too much direct sunlight can cause the leaf margins and tiny plantlets to turn yellow or wilt. It's best to provide some shade or indirect light to keep other plants around your plant happy. 

Leggy Growth: If the mother of thousands doesn't get enough light, it can become leggy and stretch out. Make sure it gets enough bright, indirect light to keep it compact and bushy. 

With a little bit of care and attention, you can help your mother of thousands and other Kalanchoe species overcome these common problems and thrive! 

FAQs - Mother of Thousands Plants 

  

Is the mother of thousands poisonous? 

The mother of thousands (Kalanchoe laetivirens) is considered to be mildly toxic to pets and humans if ingested. It's always best to keep it out of reach of curious pets and children.

How do you care for Kalanchoe laetivirens? 

To take care of the Kalanchoe laetivirens (mother of thousands), make sure it gets plenty of bright, indirect sunlight. Water it when the soil is dry, but be careful not to overwater as it can lead to root rot. It prefers temperatures between 60°F and 85°F, so keep it away from extreme cold or hot temperatures. 

You can grow them outdoors in USDA zones 9-11. Use well-drained succulent soil and propagate it by removing the baby plantlets and planting them in a separate pot. With a little love and attention, your mother of thousands will thrive! 

Is the mother of a thousand an indoor or outdoor plant? 

The Kalanchoe laetivirens, commonly called mother of thousands can be grown both indoors and outdoors, depending on your preference and climate. It can thrive indoors with bright, indirect sunlight or outdoors in well-draining soil and a suitable climate.

Is the mother of thousands rare? 

The mother of thousands (Kalanchoe laetivirens) is actually quite common and can be found in many places. It's a popular succulent that many people enjoy growing because of its unique growth habit and interesting appearance.  

So, you won't have any trouble finding one if you're looking to add it to your plant collection!

What is the difference between a mother of thousands and mother of millions? 

The difference between a mother of thousands and a mother of millions is mainly in their scientific names and some slight variations in appearance. The Mother of Thousands, also known as Kalanchoe laetivirens, has leaves that produce baby plantlets along their edges, giving it a "thousand" effect.  

The Mother of Millions, also known as Kalanchoe delagoense, produces baby plantlets on the tips of its leaves, hence the "millions" name.   

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