Pinecone Cactus &
Pinecone Cactus &
Pinecone Cactus &
Pinecone Cactus &
Pinecone Cactus &
Pinecone Cactus &
Pinecone Cactus &
Pinecone Cactus &
Pinecone Cactus &
Pinecone Cactus &
Pinecone Cactus &
Pinecone Cactus &

The pinecone cactus, also known as Tephrocactus articulatus, is a wonderful cactus that resembles pinecones. This pine cone plant belongs to the Cactaceae family and is native to Western Argentina. It is also known as Spruce cone cholla and spruce cone cactus. 

The pinecone cactus can grow up to 12 inches in height. These winter-dormant plants have knobby stem segments and resemble silvery to powdered blue pinecones! The pinecone-shaped segments are covered in small, white spines that give the plant a fuzzy texture. These spines help protect the cactus from predators and also assist in reducing water loss.  

The flowers of the pinecone cactus are surely full of charm and stand out because of their unique bell shape. This Argentinian species produces stunning white flowers with yellow centers from late spring to mid-summer. Pinecone cactus is clump-forming with a slow growth rate. 

To propagate this upright unusual cactus Tephrocactus articulatus, stem cuttings or the segment cuttings are the best approach. Pinecone cactus care is manageable.  

Being a friendly plant, the pinecone cactus is not considered toxic, it is safe for both humans and pets to have around. 

Additionally, the pinecone cactus does have a stunning variety called the paper spine cactus or Tephrocactus articulatus var. papyracanthus.  

Watering Needs 

When it comes to watering the pinecone plant, it's important to find the right balance. This cactus is native to arid regions, so it's adapted to survive in dry conditions. Water these low-growing cacti deeply. Overwatering can be a common mistake, so it's better to err on the side of underwatering. Make sure to not water them again until the soil is fully dried out. Besides, it is recommended to use containers with holes for drainage. 

During the growing season, which is typically spring and summer, you can water the pinecone cactus once every 2-3 weeks. Before watering, make sure the soil has completely dried out from the previous watering. It's important to avoid letting your Tephrocactus articulatus sit in water, as this can lead to root rot. 

In the winter months, when the cactus is in its dormant phase, you can reduce the watering frequency to once a month or even less. This allows the pinecone plant to rest and conserve energy during its dormant period. 

Light Requirements 

The pinecone cactus loves basking in the sunshine! This pinecone plant variety prefers to be kept in full sun to partial shade, so find a spot where it can soak up some rays. Place for 4-6 hours in bright sunlight or near a south-facing window for better results. 

Just make sure to avoid exposing it to direct, intense sunlight, as that can lead to sunburn. Remember, the pinecone cactus is like a sun-loving friend, but it still needs some shade to stay happy and healthy. 

Optimal Soil & Fertilizer Needs 

The pinecone cactus likes very airy, porous, nutrient-rich soil with a pH of 5.6- 6.7. Cacti require well-drained soil that dries completely between waterings. Your soil must have a sandy texture and a low water-holding capacity, just like desert soil. Soggy wet soil can damage your cactus and contribute to bacterial and fungal rot. Ideally, you want to use our succulent soil or specialized cactus potting mix that contains 5 natural substrates and organic mycorrhizae to promote the development of a strong root system that helps your cactus to thrive. 

As for fertilizing, the pinecone cactus doesn't require frequent feeding. During the growing season, which is typically spring, you can use a balanced cactus fertilizer with an equal mix of about 5-10-5 (NPK). Apply the fertilizer once a year to provide the necessary nutrients for healthy growth. Just remember, less is more when it comes to fertilizing this pinecone plant! 

Hardiness Zone & More 

These pinecone plants belong to the hardiness zone of 8 to 10. Protect from extreme cold, as this species is frost sensitive and only hardy to 20°F for brief periods.In terms of temperature, the pinecone cactus prefers a warm and dry climate. It thrives in temperatures between 70°F to 90°F. It's important to protect it from extreme cold or frost, as prolonged exposure to freezing temperatures can damage or even kill the plant. 

When it comes to humidity, the pinecone cactus is well-suited to low-humidity environments. It can tolerate dry conditions, making it a great choice for arid regions. However, it's always a good idea to provide some occasional humidity by misting the plant or placing a tray of water nearby to mimic its natural habitat. 

Remember, creating a warm and dry environment with proper temperature and humidity levels will help your pinecone cactus thrive! 

With the help of Tephrocactus articulatus pinecone cactus, you'll start to spend less time maintaining your garden and more time taking in its beauty! 

Bloom Season Late springmid summer
Botanical Name Tephrocactus articulatus
Dormancy Winter
Family Cactaceae
Flower Color Pale yellow
Mature Size 612 in
Native Area Argentina
Resistance 9°c

Pests & Common Problems of Pinecone Cactus

The pinecone cactus is a popular succulent plant among collectors. However, like any other cacti, it is not immune to pests and common problems. Here are some common pests and problems that can affect the pinecone cactus: 

Mealybugs: These tiny, white insects can infest the cactus and leave a cottony residue. Use a cotton swab dipped in rubbing alcohol to remove them.

Scale insects: These pests appear as small, oval-shaped bumps on the cactus. Use a soft brush or cloth dipped in soapy water to gently remove them. 

Root rot: Overwatering can lead to root rot, causing the roots to become mushy and black. Ensure that the soil is well-draining and only water when the top inch of soil is dry.

Sunburn: Exposing the pinecone cactus to direct, intense sunlight can cause sunburn. Move it to a spot with bright, indirect light to prevent this. 

Yellowing or wilting: This can be a sign of overwatering or underwatering. Adjust your watering routine accordingly and ensure proper drainage.

Remember, keeping an eye out for these issues and providing the right care will help keep your pinecone cactus happy and healthy! 

FAQs - Pinecone Cactus Plant

How do you take care of a pinecone cactus? 

Taking care of a pinecone cactus is super easy! Just make sure it gets plenty of full sun to partial shade for at least 4-6 hours a day. Water it only when the soil is dry, and use a well-draining cactus soil mix.  

Keep it in a warm environment, between 70°F to 90°F; can be grown outdoors in USDA 8-11 and avoid overwatering to prevent root rot. During the growing season, once a year in the spring, feed it with diluted cactus fertilizer.  

Do pinecone cactus bloom? 

Yes, pinecone cacti can produce blooms! They typically bloom in the spring or summer, and their flowers can be in various colors, including shades of white, yellow, pink, or red. The flowers are usually small and delicate, adding a beautiful touch to the cactus. Enjoy the blooms when they appear! 

How to plant a pinecone cactus? 

Planting pinecones should start by selecting a well-draining cactus soil mix. Choose a pot with drainage holes. Gently remove the cactus from its current pot and loosen the roots. Place it in the new pot, making sure the roots are spread out.  

Add soil around the cactus, firming it gently. Water lightly, allowing the soil to dry between waterings. Keep it in a bright spot with indirect sunlight. 

Is a pinecone cactus poisonous? 

No worries! Pinecone cacti are not considered to be toxic to humans or pets. They are generally safe to have around.

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Pinecone Cactus 'Tephrocactus articulatus'

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Regular price$ 9.99
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Please note: All Landscape Ready plants that are in a 6-inch pot or larger WILL NOT come with a pot as it will be shipped bare root.

  • In stock, ready to ship
  • Inventory on the way

Please note: Our large plants are many years old, and as a result, they might have minor scaring but will arrive 100% healthy and looking great.

Please note: Our large plants are shipped bare root. They are also many years old, and as a result, they might have minor scaring but will arrive healthy and looking great.

If you live in a cold climate and are expecting temperatures below 40 degrees within the next five days after placing your order, we highly recommend adding a heat pack to your order. If you do not order a heat pack, we do not send one with your order.

BUY HEAT PACKS HERE

**FREE HEAT PACK WITH ORDERS OVER $50 before taxes and shipping- BY REQUEST ONLY, PLEASE MAKE A NOTE ON YOUR ORDER.

To prevent plants from freezing while in transit, orders placed for areas with extreme severe freezing temperatures will be held for shipment until it is safe to ship.

Plants that are in 3.5" pots and smaller will be shipped in its pot to prevent any damage to the roots. Any plant that is 6" and larger WILL NOT come with a pot as it will be shipped bare root.

Depending on the species and season, you will receive a very similar plant to the one in the picture. It may or may not be blooming at the time of your purchase.

We ship via USPS Priority Mail, and we calculate the shipping cost based on the weight and volume of your purchase. Care instructions are included in every package you order. Please allow us up to 3 business days to process your order. Depending on your location, we will ship the plants on a certain day to avoid transit time during weekends or holidays. If you wish to receive your order on a specific date, or have special instructions, please add a note on your order. If you have any questions or comments, please feel free to contact us at any time.

  • Description
  • Key Plant Features

The pinecone cactus, also known as Tephrocactus articulatus, is a wonderful cactus that resembles pinecones. This pine cone plant belongs to the Cactaceae family and is native to Western Argentina. It is also known as Spruce cone cholla and spruce cone cactus. 

The pinecone cactus can grow up to 12 inches in height. These winter-dormant plants have knobby stem segments and resemble silvery to powdered blue pinecones! The pinecone-shaped segments are covered in small, white spines that give the plant a fuzzy texture. These spines help protect the cactus from predators and also assist in reducing water loss.  

The flowers of the pinecone cactus are surely full of charm and stand out because of their unique bell shape. This Argentinian species produces stunning white flowers with yellow centers from late spring to mid-summer. Pinecone cactus is clump-forming with a slow growth rate. 

To propagate this upright unusual cactus Tephrocactus articulatus, stem cuttings or the segment cuttings are the best approach. Pinecone cactus care is manageable.  

Being a friendly plant, the pinecone cactus is not considered toxic, it is safe for both humans and pets to have around. 

Additionally, the pinecone cactus does have a stunning variety called the paper spine cactus or Tephrocactus articulatus var. papyracanthus.  

Watering Needs 

When it comes to watering the pinecone plant, it's important to find the right balance. This cactus is native to arid regions, so it's adapted to survive in dry conditions. Water these low-growing cacti deeply. Overwatering can be a common mistake, so it's better to err on the side of underwatering. Make sure to not water them again until the soil is fully dried out. Besides, it is recommended to use containers with holes for drainage. 

During the growing season, which is typically spring and summer, you can water the pinecone cactus once every 2-3 weeks. Before watering, make sure the soil has completely dried out from the previous watering. It's important to avoid letting your Tephrocactus articulatus sit in water, as this can lead to root rot. 

In the winter months, when the cactus is in its dormant phase, you can reduce the watering frequency to once a month or even less. This allows the pinecone plant to rest and conserve energy during its dormant period. 

Light Requirements 

The pinecone cactus loves basking in the sunshine! This pinecone plant variety prefers to be kept in full sun to partial shade, so find a spot where it can soak up some rays. Place for 4-6 hours in bright sunlight or near a south-facing window for better results. 

Just make sure to avoid exposing it to direct, intense sunlight, as that can lead to sunburn. Remember, the pinecone cactus is like a sun-loving friend, but it still needs some shade to stay happy and healthy. 

Optimal Soil & Fertilizer Needs 

The pinecone cactus likes very airy, porous, nutrient-rich soil with a pH of 5.6- 6.7. Cacti require well-drained soil that dries completely between waterings. Your soil must have a sandy texture and a low water-holding capacity, just like desert soil. Soggy wet soil can damage your cactus and contribute to bacterial and fungal rot. Ideally, you want to use our succulent soil or specialized cactus potting mix that contains 5 natural substrates and organic mycorrhizae to promote the development of a strong root system that helps your cactus to thrive. 

As for fertilizing, the pinecone cactus doesn't require frequent feeding. During the growing season, which is typically spring, you can use a balanced cactus fertilizer with an equal mix of about 5-10-5 (NPK). Apply the fertilizer once a year to provide the necessary nutrients for healthy growth. Just remember, less is more when it comes to fertilizing this pinecone plant! 

Hardiness Zone & More 

These pinecone plants belong to the hardiness zone of 8 to 10. Protect from extreme cold, as this species is frost sensitive and only hardy to 20°F for brief periods.In terms of temperature, the pinecone cactus prefers a warm and dry climate. It thrives in temperatures between 70°F to 90°F. It's important to protect it from extreme cold or frost, as prolonged exposure to freezing temperatures can damage or even kill the plant. 

When it comes to humidity, the pinecone cactus is well-suited to low-humidity environments. It can tolerate dry conditions, making it a great choice for arid regions. However, it's always a good idea to provide some occasional humidity by misting the plant or placing a tray of water nearby to mimic its natural habitat. 

Remember, creating a warm and dry environment with proper temperature and humidity levels will help your pinecone cactus thrive! 

With the help of Tephrocactus articulatus pinecone cactus, you'll start to spend less time maintaining your garden and more time taking in its beauty! 

Bloom Season Late springmid summer
Botanical Name Tephrocactus articulatus
Dormancy Winter
Family Cactaceae
Flower Color Pale yellow
Mature Size 612 in
Native Area Argentina
Resistance 9°c

Pests & Common Problems of Pinecone Cactus

The pinecone cactus is a popular succulent plant among collectors. However, like any other cacti, it is not immune to pests and common problems. Here are some common pests and problems that can affect the pinecone cactus: 

Mealybugs: These tiny, white insects can infest the cactus and leave a cottony residue. Use a cotton swab dipped in rubbing alcohol to remove them.

Scale insects: These pests appear as small, oval-shaped bumps on the cactus. Use a soft brush or cloth dipped in soapy water to gently remove them. 

Root rot: Overwatering can lead to root rot, causing the roots to become mushy and black. Ensure that the soil is well-draining and only water when the top inch of soil is dry.

Sunburn: Exposing the pinecone cactus to direct, intense sunlight can cause sunburn. Move it to a spot with bright, indirect light to prevent this. 

Yellowing or wilting: This can be a sign of overwatering or underwatering. Adjust your watering routine accordingly and ensure proper drainage.

Remember, keeping an eye out for these issues and providing the right care will help keep your pinecone cactus happy and healthy! 

FAQs - Pinecone Cactus Plant

How do you take care of a pinecone cactus? 

Taking care of a pinecone cactus is super easy! Just make sure it gets plenty of full sun to partial shade for at least 4-6 hours a day. Water it only when the soil is dry, and use a well-draining cactus soil mix.  

Keep it in a warm environment, between 70°F to 90°F; can be grown outdoors in USDA 8-11 and avoid overwatering to prevent root rot. During the growing season, once a year in the spring, feed it with diluted cactus fertilizer.  

Do pinecone cactus bloom? 

Yes, pinecone cacti can produce blooms! They typically bloom in the spring or summer, and their flowers can be in various colors, including shades of white, yellow, pink, or red. The flowers are usually small and delicate, adding a beautiful touch to the cactus. Enjoy the blooms when they appear! 

How to plant a pinecone cactus? 

Planting pinecones should start by selecting a well-draining cactus soil mix. Choose a pot with drainage holes. Gently remove the cactus from its current pot and loosen the roots. Place it in the new pot, making sure the roots are spread out.  

Add soil around the cactus, firming it gently. Water lightly, allowing the soil to dry between waterings. Keep it in a bright spot with indirect sunlight. 

Is a pinecone cactus poisonous? 

No worries! Pinecone cacti are not considered to be toxic to humans or pets. They are generally safe to have around.

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