Pink Lady - Turtle Vine &
Pink Lady - Turtle Vine &
Pink Lady - Turtle Vine &
Pink Lady - Turtle Vine &
Pink Lady - Turtle Vine &
Pink Lady - Turtle Vine &
Pink Lady - Turtle Vine &
Pink Lady - Turtle Vine &
Pink Lady - Turtle Vine &
Pink Lady - Turtle Vine &
Pink Lady - Turtle Vine &
Pink Lady - Turtle Vine &
Pink Lady - Turtle Vine &
Pink Lady - Turtle Vine &
Pink Lady - Turtle Vine &
Pink Lady - Turtle Vine &
Pink Lady - Turtle Vine &
Pink Lady - Turtle Vine &
Pink Lady - Turtle Vine &

Welcome to the fascinating world of trailing succulents! If you're looking for a striking and unique addition to your plant collection, look no further than the highly prized variegated variety of turtle vine plant 'Callisia repens variegated' a vibrant member of the Callisia genus, known as Pink Lady, a Creeping inch plant, turtle vine, and pink turtle vine. 

The variegated pink lady plant, sometimes mistaken for Callisia pink panther, shares similarities with pink and green variegation but differs in appearance and growth habits. Callisia repens pink panther has larger, elongated leaves with a pronounced pink color, while Pink Lady has smaller, rounded leaves with a subtle pink coloration.    

This Callisia repens variegated 'Pink Lady' is a low-growing succulent with stems that bear small round waxy leaves. It grows up to 6 inches tall.  If given enough time to grow, this succulent can become quite dense and even spill out of containers. Pink lady leaves can grow up to 1 inch long and can be green-striped, pinkish, or creamy with a burgundy underside.  It blooms in late spring or early summer with tiny white flowers that have only three petals. 

Once the plants have finished blooming, stem cuttings can often encourage a second bloom and help prevent re-seeding. Pink lady Callisia repens is a non-toxic-friendly plant for both humans and pets.  

Watering Needs 

The pink lady, despite being semi-succulent, prefers moderate watering during the spring and summer growing seasons because it doesn't like completely dry or soggy soil. 

When it comes to storing water, this pink lady turtle vine is an absolute rockstar. However, you don't want to overwater this beauty; instead, wait until the topsoil is completely dry before giving it another drink. Remember, underwatering can cause the leaves to wilt and become dry and crispy while overwatering can cause the leaves to turn yellow and fall off. So, it's important to keep the soil moist, but not overly wet, to maintain healthy foliage. 

To encourage healthy root development, watering should be done deeply but sparingly in winter when it is in a dormant phase. 

Light Requirements 

This vibrant Pink lady prefers to bask in at least six hours of bright, indirect light but it is not afraid to soak up some rays in sunny areas. The key is to keep it compact and maintain those gorgeous pink variegated leaves. 

But beware, too much sun can lead to burns, so make sure you gradually increase exposure or move it indoors during a heatwave. And if your turtle vine pink lady isn't getting enough light for a longer period, it'll start stretching toward its source, and its color will turn green or fade. 

So let's give your Callisia plant what it deserves - just the right amount of light to bloom into the ultimate showstopper! 

Optimal Soil & Fertilizer Needs 

The pink lady likes very airy, porous, nutrient-rich soil with a pH of 5.5- 6.5. It requires fast-draining soil that dries completely between waterings. Your soil must have a sandy texture and a low water-holding capacity, just like desert soil. Instead, make or buy a well-draining potting mix, or ideally use our specialized potting mix or succulent soil mix that contains over 5 natural substrates and mycorrhizae to promote the development of a strong root system that helps your succulent to thrive. 

When it comes to fertilizer, a small amount of natural fertilizer with lower doses of NPK (5-10-5) applied once a year in springtime encourages nutrient absorption and keeps your hanging-inch plant healthy. Remember, never fertilize your variegated turtle vine if it has recently been replanted or if it is experiencing problems, as it is not a medicine. Analyze the plant and make adjustments as needed. 

Hardiness Zones & More 

The pink lady plants are tropical succulents, these (Callisia plants) typically grow indoors in colder climates. These are hardy in USDA zone 10-11, which means they can tolerate temperatures between 65-75 degrees Fahrenheit. 

In cooler zones, it can be kept outdoors during the summer and brought indoors in a bright, sunny window or under grow lights as the temperature drops. It can also benefit from occasional misting to increase humidity around the pink lady Callisia. 

We think you will love this trailing plant – order your very own Callisia repens Pink Lady today and start enjoying its beauty in no time in a creeping basket plant! 

Bloom Season Late spring , early summer
Botanical Name Callisia repens variegated
Common Name Pink Lady plant, Creeping inch plant, turtle vine, pink turtle vine
Dormancy Winter
Family Commelinaceae
Flower Color White, pink
Genus Callisia
Growth Habit Trailing, Creeping
Growth Rate Slow
Hardiness Zone 10, 11
Mature Size Up to 6 in. tall
Native Area Central America, South America
Plant Type Perennial succulent
Propagation By stem cuttings, offsets, seeds
Resistance Drought tolerant, deer resistant, pest resistant, heat tolerant
Soil PH 6.5, Acidic, Neutral
Soil Type Welldrained sandy soil
Special Features Showy flowers, variegated leaves
Sun Exposure Full sun, partial shade
Toxicity Safe for humans, FRiendly to dogs, friendly to cats
Watering Needs Low

Pests & Common Problems of Pink Lady Plant

Pink lady 'Callisia repens variegated' is not particularly vulnerable to pests such as spider mites and mealybugs, but it can be affected just like any other houseplant. It is unusual for you to have issues with it. Let's go over the ones that might show up! 

Pests attack: To prevent these pests from infesting the pink lady, it is important to keep the plant in a clean environment and avoid overwatering, as this can create a humid environment that is conducive to pest infestations. If pests are present, they can be treated with insecticidal soap or neem oil, which are effective at killing pests without harming the plant. 

Rot: It can also be a problem for the pink lady, as it can cause the roots and stems to rot. To prevent this problem, it is important to plant the plant in well-draining soil and to avoid watering it too frequently. 

Yellowing of leaves: A common sign of root rot is the yellowing of leaves, which eventually drop off. These are also signs of a plant that doesn't get enough sunlight. The leaves will be yellow if your soil has been dry, especially in the winter. For a few days, leave the plant outside in the sun for about six hours each day, and it will heal. 

Powdery Mildew: Powdery mildew is a white and moldy disease that can be caused by poor air circulation and humidity. To remove it without damaging the plant, dissolve one tablespoon of baking soda into a gallon of water and wash the plant with a baking soda mixture.

FAQs - Pink Lady Plant

Is Callisia repens pink lady poisonous? 

Callisia repens, including the Pink Lady, a variegated cultivar, is not known to be toxic to humans or pets when ingested. However, it's always a good idea to keep plants out of reach of pets and children to prevent accidental ingestion. If ingested, the plant may cause mild stomach upset or irritation. 

Does Callisia repens like sun or shade? 

Callisia repens variegated prefers bright, indirect light (or partial shade), and can tolerate some direct sun, especially in the morning or late afternoon. However, too much direct sunlight can cause the leaves to scorch or turn brown.

If you're growing the plant indoors, it's best to place it in a bright, sunny window or under grow lights to maintain its unique deep purple dots with subtle pink foliage. If you're growing the plant outdoors, it's best to provide some shade during the hottest part of the day to prevent the leaves from burning. 

Is Pink Lady a succulent? 

Pink Lady, along with some other plants in the Commelinaceae family, are sometimes referred to as "semi-succulents" due to their ability to store some water in their leaves and stems. While they are not true succulents, they do have some characteristics in common with succulents, such as the ability to tolerate periods of drought and a preference for well-draining soil. However, they also have some differences in care requirements, such as preferring higher humidity levels than most succulents. 

Are Pink Panther and Pink Lady the same plant? 

No, Pink Panther and Pink Lady are not the same plants, although they are both cultivars of Callisia repens. While they share some similarities, such as their pink and green variegation, they have some differences in appearance and growth habits. Callisia repens pink panther has larger, more elongated leaves with a more pronounced pink coloration, while Pink Lady has smaller, more rounded leaves with a more subtle pink coloration.

Additionally, Pink Panther tends to grow more upright, while Pink Lady has a more trailing growth habit.

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Pink Lady - Turtle Vine 'Callisia repens variegated'

sku: 1929

13 reviews
Regular price$ 18.59
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Please note: All Landscape Ready plants that are in a 6-inch pot or larger WILL NOT come with a pot as it will be shipped bare root.

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Please note: Our large plants are many years old, and as a result, they might have minor scaring but will arrive 100% healthy and looking great.

Please note: Our large plants are shipped bare root. They are also many years old, and as a result, they might have minor scaring but will arrive healthy and looking great.

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Detailed description of this plant is below...

If you live in a cold climate and are expecting temperatures below 40 degrees within the next five days after placing your order, we highly recommend adding a heat pack to your order. If you do not order a heat pack, we do not send one with your order.

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**FREE HEAT PACK WITH ORDERS OVER $50 before taxes and shipping- BY REQUEST ONLY, PLEASE MAKE A NOTE ON YOUR ORDER.

To prevent plants from freezing while in transit, orders placed for areas with extreme severe freezing temperatures will be held for shipment until it is safe to ship.

FREE SHIPPING ON ALL ORDERS OVER $89 in the
Continental US.

Plants that are in 3.5" pots and smaller will be shipped in its pot to prevent any damage to the roots.

Any plant that is 6" and larger WILL NOT come with a pot as it will be shipped bare root.

Depending on the species and season, you will receive a very similar plant to the one in the picture. It may or may not be blooming at the time of your purchase.

We ship via USPS Priority Mail, If you don't get Free Shipping, then we calculate the shipping cost based on the weight and volume of your purchase.

Care instructions are included in every package you order. Please allow us up to 3 business days to process your order. Depending on your location, we will ship the plants on a certain day to avoid transit time during weekends or holidays. If you wish to receive your order on a specific date, or have special instructions, please add a note on your order. If you have any questions or comments, please feel free to contact us at any time.

  • Description
  • Key Plant Features

Welcome to the fascinating world of trailing succulents! If you're looking for a striking and unique addition to your plant collection, look no further than the highly prized variegated variety of turtle vine plant 'Callisia repens variegated' a vibrant member of the Callisia genus, known as Pink Lady, a Creeping inch plant, turtle vine, and pink turtle vine. 

The variegated pink lady plant, sometimes mistaken for Callisia pink panther, shares similarities with pink and green variegation but differs in appearance and growth habits. Callisia repens pink panther has larger, elongated leaves with a pronounced pink color, while Pink Lady has smaller, rounded leaves with a subtle pink coloration.    

This Callisia repens variegated 'Pink Lady' is a low-growing succulent with stems that bear small round waxy leaves. It grows up to 6 inches tall.  If given enough time to grow, this succulent can become quite dense and even spill out of containers. Pink lady leaves can grow up to 1 inch long and can be green-striped, pinkish, or creamy with a burgundy underside.  It blooms in late spring or early summer with tiny white flowers that have only three petals. 

Once the plants have finished blooming, stem cuttings can often encourage a second bloom and help prevent re-seeding. Pink lady Callisia repens is a non-toxic-friendly plant for both humans and pets.  

Watering Needs 

The pink lady, despite being semi-succulent, prefers moderate watering during the spring and summer growing seasons because it doesn't like completely dry or soggy soil. 

When it comes to storing water, this pink lady turtle vine is an absolute rockstar. However, you don't want to overwater this beauty; instead, wait until the topsoil is completely dry before giving it another drink. Remember, underwatering can cause the leaves to wilt and become dry and crispy while overwatering can cause the leaves to turn yellow and fall off. So, it's important to keep the soil moist, but not overly wet, to maintain healthy foliage. 

To encourage healthy root development, watering should be done deeply but sparingly in winter when it is in a dormant phase. 

Light Requirements 

This vibrant Pink lady prefers to bask in at least six hours of bright, indirect light but it is not afraid to soak up some rays in sunny areas. The key is to keep it compact and maintain those gorgeous pink variegated leaves. 

But beware, too much sun can lead to burns, so make sure you gradually increase exposure or move it indoors during a heatwave. And if your turtle vine pink lady isn't getting enough light for a longer period, it'll start stretching toward its source, and its color will turn green or fade. 

So let's give your Callisia plant what it deserves - just the right amount of light to bloom into the ultimate showstopper! 

Optimal Soil & Fertilizer Needs 

The pink lady likes very airy, porous, nutrient-rich soil with a pH of 5.5- 6.5. It requires fast-draining soil that dries completely between waterings. Your soil must have a sandy texture and a low water-holding capacity, just like desert soil. Instead, make or buy a well-draining potting mix, or ideally use our specialized potting mix or succulent soil mix that contains over 5 natural substrates and mycorrhizae to promote the development of a strong root system that helps your succulent to thrive. 

When it comes to fertilizer, a small amount of natural fertilizer with lower doses of NPK (5-10-5) applied once a year in springtime encourages nutrient absorption and keeps your hanging-inch plant healthy. Remember, never fertilize your variegated turtle vine if it has recently been replanted or if it is experiencing problems, as it is not a medicine. Analyze the plant and make adjustments as needed. 

Hardiness Zones & More 

The pink lady plants are tropical succulents, these (Callisia plants) typically grow indoors in colder climates. These are hardy in USDA zone 10-11, which means they can tolerate temperatures between 65-75 degrees Fahrenheit. 

In cooler zones, it can be kept outdoors during the summer and brought indoors in a bright, sunny window or under grow lights as the temperature drops. It can also benefit from occasional misting to increase humidity around the pink lady Callisia. 

We think you will love this trailing plant – order your very own Callisia repens Pink Lady today and start enjoying its beauty in no time in a creeping basket plant! 

Bloom Season Late spring , early summer
Botanical Name Callisia repens variegated
Common Name Pink Lady plant, Creeping inch plant, turtle vine, pink turtle vine
Dormancy Winter
Family Commelinaceae
Flower Color White, pink
Genus Callisia
Growth Habit Trailing, Creeping
Growth Rate Slow
Hardiness Zone 10, 11
Mature Size Up to 6 in. tall
Native Area Central America, South America
Plant Type Perennial succulent
Propagation By stem cuttings, offsets, seeds
Resistance Drought tolerant, deer resistant, pest resistant, heat tolerant
Soil PH 6.5, Acidic, Neutral
Soil Type Welldrained sandy soil
Special Features Showy flowers, variegated leaves
Sun Exposure Full sun, partial shade
Toxicity Safe for humans, FRiendly to dogs, friendly to cats
Watering Needs Low

Pests & Common Problems of Pink Lady Plant

Pink lady 'Callisia repens variegated' is not particularly vulnerable to pests such as spider mites and mealybugs, but it can be affected just like any other houseplant. It is unusual for you to have issues with it. Let's go over the ones that might show up! 

Pests attack: To prevent these pests from infesting the pink lady, it is important to keep the plant in a clean environment and avoid overwatering, as this can create a humid environment that is conducive to pest infestations. If pests are present, they can be treated with insecticidal soap or neem oil, which are effective at killing pests without harming the plant. 

Rot: It can also be a problem for the pink lady, as it can cause the roots and stems to rot. To prevent this problem, it is important to plant the plant in well-draining soil and to avoid watering it too frequently. 

Yellowing of leaves: A common sign of root rot is the yellowing of leaves, which eventually drop off. These are also signs of a plant that doesn't get enough sunlight. The leaves will be yellow if your soil has been dry, especially in the winter. For a few days, leave the plant outside in the sun for about six hours each day, and it will heal. 

Powdery Mildew: Powdery mildew is a white and moldy disease that can be caused by poor air circulation and humidity. To remove it without damaging the plant, dissolve one tablespoon of baking soda into a gallon of water and wash the plant with a baking soda mixture.

FAQs - Pink Lady Plant

Is Callisia repens pink lady poisonous? 

Callisia repens, including the Pink Lady, a variegated cultivar, is not known to be toxic to humans or pets when ingested. However, it's always a good idea to keep plants out of reach of pets and children to prevent accidental ingestion. If ingested, the plant may cause mild stomach upset or irritation. 

Does Callisia repens like sun or shade? 

Callisia repens variegated prefers bright, indirect light (or partial shade), and can tolerate some direct sun, especially in the morning or late afternoon. However, too much direct sunlight can cause the leaves to scorch or turn brown.

If you're growing the plant indoors, it's best to place it in a bright, sunny window or under grow lights to maintain its unique deep purple dots with subtle pink foliage. If you're growing the plant outdoors, it's best to provide some shade during the hottest part of the day to prevent the leaves from burning. 

Is Pink Lady a succulent? 

Pink Lady, along with some other plants in the Commelinaceae family, are sometimes referred to as "semi-succulents" due to their ability to store some water in their leaves and stems. While they are not true succulents, they do have some characteristics in common with succulents, such as the ability to tolerate periods of drought and a preference for well-draining soil. However, they also have some differences in care requirements, such as preferring higher humidity levels than most succulents. 

Are Pink Panther and Pink Lady the same plant? 

No, Pink Panther and Pink Lady are not the same plants, although they are both cultivars of Callisia repens. While they share some similarities, such as their pink and green variegation, they have some differences in appearance and growth habits. Callisia repens pink panther has larger, more elongated leaves with a more pronounced pink coloration, while Pink Lady has smaller, more rounded leaves with a more subtle pink coloration.

Additionally, Pink Panther tends to grow more upright, while Pink Lady has a more trailing growth habit.

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