Queensland Bottle Tree &
Queensland Bottle Tree &
Queensland Bottle Tree &
Queensland Bottle Tree &
Queensland Bottle Tree &
Queensland Bottle Tree &
Queensland Bottle Tree &
Queensland Bottle Tree &
Queensland Bottle Tree &
Queensland Bottle Tree &
Queensland Bottle Tree &
Queensland Bottle Tree &
Queensland Bottle Tree &
Queensland Bottle Tree &
Queensland Bottle Tree &
Queensland Bottle Tree &
Queensland Bottle Tree &
Queensland Bottle Tree &
Queensland Bottle Tree &
Queensland Bottle Tree &
Queensland Bottle Tree &
Queensland Bottle Tree &
Queensland Bottle Tree &
Queensland Bottle Tree &
Queensland Bottle Tree &
Queensland Bottle Tree &
Queensland Bottle Tree &
Queensland Bottle Tree &
Queensland Bottle Tree &
Queensland Bottle Tree &
Queensland Bottle Tree &
Queensland Bottle Tree &
Queensland Bottle Tree &
Queensland Bottle Tree &
Queensland Bottle Tree &
Queensland Bottle Tree &
Queensland Bottle Tree &

Get ready to be amazed by the majestic Queensland bottle tree, also known as Brachychiton rupestris! You will adore the remarkable characteristics of this native Australian tree from Queensland. It was discovered and described by the renowned Sir Thomas Mitchell and John Lindley. This beauty, also known as the Australian bottle tree or narrow-leaved bottle tree, gets its name from its incredible growth habit and narrow leaf blades.

The Queensland bottle tree belongs to the Malvaceae family and is characterized by a large, unique bottle-shaped trunk, but it takes about 5 to 10 years to get that shape. A mature Queensland bottle tree root develops a thickened caudex, which makes an unusual bonsai.

With its narrow leaves (or adult leaf blades) and bulbous trunk reaching up to 11 feet in diameter, it commands attention like a true showstopper. Rising high between 33 and 82 feet in its native habitat, the Queensland bottle tree proudly showcases its deciduous nature, which means the trees shed leaves from September to December. The bottle tree in a pot grows even smaller, to about 15 feet tall. It blooms into creamy-yellow flowers with red markings from spring to summer.

The Brachychiton rupestrisor Queensland bottle tree has a moderate growth rate throughout the year without any distinct dormant season, and mature trees transplant easily. The fibrous, dark grey bark of this bottle tree plant is used for making ropes and used for making fishing nets.

The bottle tree plays a vital role in preserving our natural habitats. Found predominantly in the endangered central semi-evergreen vine thickets (also known as bottletree scrub) of the Queensland Brigalow Belt, this majestic tree stands as an emergent hero among its fellow flora friends. So intriguing is this species that even farmers who clear land often choose to leave these remnants behind for their shade and fodder trees.

Watering Needs 

The Queensland bottle tree requires frequent watering during its early years to establish its root system. Once the Brachychiton rupestris tree is established, it can survive on natural rainfall. However, during long periods of drought, it is important to water the bottled tree to prevent it from drying out. It is recommended to water this Queensland bottle tree deeply once a week during dry spells. 

It's worth noting that overwatering the tree can lead to root rot. So, it's important to avoid watering this bottle tree too frequently or letting the upper surface of the soil become waterlogged. The best way to water these woody boat-shaped follicles of Queensland is to soak the soil around the tree slowly and deeply, allowing the water to penetrate the soil and reach the roots.

Light Requirements 

Like other sun-loving succulents, Brachychiton rupestris prefers bright sunlight. When grown indoors, place it in the sunniest place in your house. This succulent tree may benefit from shade in consistently hot climates. It is ideal to grow this bottle tree in a west- or south-facing window.

If you are growing your Queensland bottle tree outdoors, it needs full sun for proper growth. It should be planted in an area that receives at least six hours of direct sunlight a day. If this proserpine bottle tree is planted in a shaded area, it may not grow as well or produce more compact flower heads.

Optimal Soil & Fertilizer Needs 

The bottle tree likes very airy, porous, nutrient-rich soil with a pH of 5.6–6.5, or slightly acidic soil. It requires fast-draining soil that dries completely between waterings. Your soil must have a sandy texture and a low water-holding capacity, just like desert soil. Ideally, you want to use our specialized succulent potting mix that contains 5 natural substrates and organic mycorrhizae to promote the development of a strong root system that helps your succulent thrive.

When it comes to fertilizing your Australian bottle tree, it only needs a small amount of fertilizer applied once a year in the spring. The Brachychiton rupestris prefers fertilizer with lower doses of NPK, with a maximum ratio of 5-10-5 that is higher in phosphorus than nitrogen. 

Hardiness Zone & More 

When grown indoors, the Queensland bottle tree prefers a temperature between 60 and 75°F. Like other tropical plants, it's important to provide them with a warm and cozy environment. Keep it away from drafts and cold spots to ensure its well-being.

If you are living in USDA zones 9–12, you can grow your Brachychiton rupestris outdoors. It prefers warm temperatures and can tolerate moderate to high humidity. The tree can withstand temperatures as low as 25°F but may suffer damage if exposed to frost.

It's important to protect the tree from frost if you live in a cooler climate. A succulent tends to live for many years and grows slowly. Plant your Brachychiton rupestris Queenlands bottle tree in the spring after the weather warms up.

The best way to propagate the Brachychiton rupestris bottle tree is by cuttings. But bottle trees grown with seeds will take up to 20 years to bloom. It is important to provide proper care to your propagated Queensland bottle tree, including regular watering and protection from extreme temperatures, to ensure its successful growth. 

The Bottom Line 

Overall, the Queensland Bottle Tree (Brachychiton rupestris), is a fascinating and beautiful tree native to Australia. It thrives in warm climates and is typically found in hardiness zones 9–12. When grown indoors, it prefers temperatures ranging from 60 to 75°F and benefits from moderate to high humidity levels. With its unique bottle-shaped trunk and lush foliage, this Australian bottle tree adds a touch of tropical beauty to any landscape. Just remember to provide it with the right temperature and create a suitable environment for its growth. Give this Brachychiton rupestris bottle tree a try if you're looking for an easy plant to care for! 

Bloom Season Spring, summer
Botanical Name Brachychiton rupestris
Common Name Queensland bottle tree, Australian bottle tree, narrow-leaved bottle tree
Dormancy Winter
Family Malvaceae
Flower Color Creamy, yellow
Genus Brachychiton
Growth Habit Caudiciform
Growth Rate Moderate
Hardiness Zone 9, 10, 11, 12
Mature Size 82 ft. tall, 11 ft. wide
Native Area Austrailia
Plant Type Succulent, tree
Propagation By stem, leaf cuttings
Resistance Drought tolerant, heat resistant, pest resistant, deer resistant
Soil PH 6.5, Acidic, Neutral
Soil Type specialized succulent potting mix
Special Features Bonsai tree
Sun Exposure Full sun, Partial shade
Toxicity Safe for humans, friendly to dogs, friendly to cats
Watering Needs Moderate

Pests & Common Problems of Queensland Bottle Tree

The Queensland bottle tree is generally a hardy tree with few pest problems. However, Brachychiton rupestris may be susceptible to scale insects, which can be treated with insecticidal soap. The tree may also suffer from root rot if the soil is too wet, so it's important to plant it in well-draining soil and avoid overwatering. Additionally, the tree may suffer from leaf drops if it is exposed to cold temperatures or if it is not receiving enough water.

FAQs - Queensland Bottle Tree Plant

How fast do Queensland bottle trees grow? 

The Queensland bottle tree (Brachychiton rupestris) is a moderate-growing tree, which means that it can take several years to reach maturity. This is because the tree puts a lot of energy into developing a strong root system before it starts growing upward. Once the tree is established, it will continue to grow at a slow but steady pace.  

However, it's important to note that the growth rate of mature trees may vary depending on factors such as soil quality, climate, and care provided to the tree. 

Do bottle trees lose their leaves? 

Yes, Australian bottle trees do lose their leaves in the winter. However, it is important to note that they are deciduous trees and shed their leaves during certain seasons, typically in response to changes in temperature or drought conditions. This is a normal part of the tree's life cycle, and it will regrow its leaves in the spring. 

What is the use of Brachychiton rupestris? 

Brachychiton rupestris, commonly known as the Queensland bottle tree, has several uses. One of its main uses is as an ornamental bonsai tree in landscaping due to its unique bottle-shaped trunk and attractive foliage.  Plus, the tree produces showy flowers and interesting seed pods that can add visual interest to your yard.  

Additionally, some indigenous communities utilize various parts of the tree for traditional medicinal purposes or for crafting items such as baskets and musical instruments. 

Do the Queensland bottle trees flower? 

Yes, the Queensland Bottle Tree (Brachychiton rupestris) produces small, bell-shaped, creamy yellow flowers with red markings. They bloom during the spring and summer seasons, adding a beautiful splash of color to the tree. These flowers are a delight to behold and attract pollinators such as bees and butterflies. 

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Queensland Bottle Tree 'Brachychiton rupestris'

sku: 2422

5 reviews
Regular price$ 19.79
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Size
Height:
Diameter:
Height: 12"-14"
Diameter: 7" - 9"
Height: 38"-46"
Diameter:

Please note: All Landscape Ready plants that are in a 6-inch pot or larger WILL NOT come with a pot as it will be shipped bare root.

  • In stock, ready to ship
  • Inventory on the way

Please note: Our large plants are many years old, and as a result, they might have minor scaring but will arrive 100% healthy and looking great.

Please note: Our large plants are shipped bare root. They are also many years old, and as a result, they might have minor scaring but will arrive healthy and looking great.

If you live in a cold climate and are expecting temperatures below 40 degrees within the next five days after placing your order, we highly recommend adding a heat pack to your order. If you do not order a heat pack, we do not send one with your order.

BUY HEAT PACKS HERE

**FREE HEAT PACK WITH ORDERS OVER $50 before taxes and shipping- BY REQUEST ONLY, PLEASE MAKE A NOTE ON YOUR ORDER.

To prevent plants from freezing while in transit, orders placed for areas with extreme severe freezing temperatures will be held for shipment until it is safe to ship.

Plants that are in 3.5" pots and smaller will be shipped in its pot to prevent any damage to the roots. Any plant that is 6" and larger WILL NOT come with a pot as it will be shipped bare root.

Depending on the species and season, you will receive a very similar plant to the one in the picture. It may or may not be blooming at the time of your purchase.

We ship via USPS Priority Mail, and we calculate the shipping cost based on the weight and volume of your purchase. Care instructions are included in every package you order. Please allow us up to 3 business days to process your order. Depending on your location, we will ship the plants on a certain day to avoid transit time during weekends or holidays. If you wish to receive your order on a specific date, or have special instructions, please add a note on your order. If you have any questions or comments, please feel free to contact us at any time.

  • Description
  • Key Plant Features

Get ready to be amazed by the majestic Queensland bottle tree, also known as Brachychiton rupestris! You will adore the remarkable characteristics of this native Australian tree from Queensland. It was discovered and described by the renowned Sir Thomas Mitchell and John Lindley. This beauty, also known as the Australian bottle tree or narrow-leaved bottle tree, gets its name from its incredible growth habit and narrow leaf blades.

The Queensland bottle tree belongs to the Malvaceae family and is characterized by a large, unique bottle-shaped trunk, but it takes about 5 to 10 years to get that shape. A mature Queensland bottle tree root develops a thickened caudex, which makes an unusual bonsai.

With its narrow leaves (or adult leaf blades) and bulbous trunk reaching up to 11 feet in diameter, it commands attention like a true showstopper. Rising high between 33 and 82 feet in its native habitat, the Queensland bottle tree proudly showcases its deciduous nature, which means the trees shed leaves from September to December. The bottle tree in a pot grows even smaller, to about 15 feet tall. It blooms into creamy-yellow flowers with red markings from spring to summer.

The Brachychiton rupestrisor Queensland bottle tree has a moderate growth rate throughout the year without any distinct dormant season, and mature trees transplant easily. The fibrous, dark grey bark of this bottle tree plant is used for making ropes and used for making fishing nets.

The bottle tree plays a vital role in preserving our natural habitats. Found predominantly in the endangered central semi-evergreen vine thickets (also known as bottletree scrub) of the Queensland Brigalow Belt, this majestic tree stands as an emergent hero among its fellow flora friends. So intriguing is this species that even farmers who clear land often choose to leave these remnants behind for their shade and fodder trees.

Watering Needs 

The Queensland bottle tree requires frequent watering during its early years to establish its root system. Once the Brachychiton rupestris tree is established, it can survive on natural rainfall. However, during long periods of drought, it is important to water the bottled tree to prevent it from drying out. It is recommended to water this Queensland bottle tree deeply once a week during dry spells. 

It's worth noting that overwatering the tree can lead to root rot. So, it's important to avoid watering this bottle tree too frequently or letting the upper surface of the soil become waterlogged. The best way to water these woody boat-shaped follicles of Queensland is to soak the soil around the tree slowly and deeply, allowing the water to penetrate the soil and reach the roots.

Light Requirements 

Like other sun-loving succulents, Brachychiton rupestris prefers bright sunlight. When grown indoors, place it in the sunniest place in your house. This succulent tree may benefit from shade in consistently hot climates. It is ideal to grow this bottle tree in a west- or south-facing window.

If you are growing your Queensland bottle tree outdoors, it needs full sun for proper growth. It should be planted in an area that receives at least six hours of direct sunlight a day. If this proserpine bottle tree is planted in a shaded area, it may not grow as well or produce more compact flower heads.

Optimal Soil & Fertilizer Needs 

The bottle tree likes very airy, porous, nutrient-rich soil with a pH of 5.6–6.5, or slightly acidic soil. It requires fast-draining soil that dries completely between waterings. Your soil must have a sandy texture and a low water-holding capacity, just like desert soil. Ideally, you want to use our specialized succulent potting mix that contains 5 natural substrates and organic mycorrhizae to promote the development of a strong root system that helps your succulent thrive.

When it comes to fertilizing your Australian bottle tree, it only needs a small amount of fertilizer applied once a year in the spring. The Brachychiton rupestris prefers fertilizer with lower doses of NPK, with a maximum ratio of 5-10-5 that is higher in phosphorus than nitrogen. 

Hardiness Zone & More 

When grown indoors, the Queensland bottle tree prefers a temperature between 60 and 75°F. Like other tropical plants, it's important to provide them with a warm and cozy environment. Keep it away from drafts and cold spots to ensure its well-being.

If you are living in USDA zones 9–12, you can grow your Brachychiton rupestris outdoors. It prefers warm temperatures and can tolerate moderate to high humidity. The tree can withstand temperatures as low as 25°F but may suffer damage if exposed to frost.

It's important to protect the tree from frost if you live in a cooler climate. A succulent tends to live for many years and grows slowly. Plant your Brachychiton rupestris Queenlands bottle tree in the spring after the weather warms up.

The best way to propagate the Brachychiton rupestris bottle tree is by cuttings. But bottle trees grown with seeds will take up to 20 years to bloom. It is important to provide proper care to your propagated Queensland bottle tree, including regular watering and protection from extreme temperatures, to ensure its successful growth. 

The Bottom Line 

Overall, the Queensland Bottle Tree (Brachychiton rupestris), is a fascinating and beautiful tree native to Australia. It thrives in warm climates and is typically found in hardiness zones 9–12. When grown indoors, it prefers temperatures ranging from 60 to 75°F and benefits from moderate to high humidity levels. With its unique bottle-shaped trunk and lush foliage, this Australian bottle tree adds a touch of tropical beauty to any landscape. Just remember to provide it with the right temperature and create a suitable environment for its growth. Give this Brachychiton rupestris bottle tree a try if you're looking for an easy plant to care for! 

Bloom Season Spring, summer
Botanical Name Brachychiton rupestris
Common Name Queensland bottle tree, Australian bottle tree, narrow-leaved bottle tree
Dormancy Winter
Family Malvaceae
Flower Color Creamy, yellow
Genus Brachychiton
Growth Habit Caudiciform
Growth Rate Moderate
Hardiness Zone 9, 10, 11, 12
Mature Size 82 ft. tall, 11 ft. wide
Native Area Austrailia
Plant Type Succulent, tree
Propagation By stem, leaf cuttings
Resistance Drought tolerant, heat resistant, pest resistant, deer resistant
Soil PH 6.5, Acidic, Neutral
Soil Type specialized succulent potting mix
Special Features Bonsai tree
Sun Exposure Full sun, Partial shade
Toxicity Safe for humans, friendly to dogs, friendly to cats
Watering Needs Moderate

Pests & Common Problems of Queensland Bottle Tree

The Queensland bottle tree is generally a hardy tree with few pest problems. However, Brachychiton rupestris may be susceptible to scale insects, which can be treated with insecticidal soap. The tree may also suffer from root rot if the soil is too wet, so it's important to plant it in well-draining soil and avoid overwatering. Additionally, the tree may suffer from leaf drops if it is exposed to cold temperatures or if it is not receiving enough water.

FAQs - Queensland Bottle Tree Plant

How fast do Queensland bottle trees grow? 

The Queensland bottle tree (Brachychiton rupestris) is a moderate-growing tree, which means that it can take several years to reach maturity. This is because the tree puts a lot of energy into developing a strong root system before it starts growing upward. Once the tree is established, it will continue to grow at a slow but steady pace.  

However, it's important to note that the growth rate of mature trees may vary depending on factors such as soil quality, climate, and care provided to the tree. 

Do bottle trees lose their leaves? 

Yes, Australian bottle trees do lose their leaves in the winter. However, it is important to note that they are deciduous trees and shed their leaves during certain seasons, typically in response to changes in temperature or drought conditions. This is a normal part of the tree's life cycle, and it will regrow its leaves in the spring. 

What is the use of Brachychiton rupestris? 

Brachychiton rupestris, commonly known as the Queensland bottle tree, has several uses. One of its main uses is as an ornamental bonsai tree in landscaping due to its unique bottle-shaped trunk and attractive foliage.  Plus, the tree produces showy flowers and interesting seed pods that can add visual interest to your yard.  

Additionally, some indigenous communities utilize various parts of the tree for traditional medicinal purposes or for crafting items such as baskets and musical instruments. 

Do the Queensland bottle trees flower? 

Yes, the Queensland Bottle Tree (Brachychiton rupestris) produces small, bell-shaped, creamy yellow flowers with red markings. They bloom during the spring and summer seasons, adding a beautiful splash of color to the tree. These flowers are a delight to behold and attract pollinators such as bees and butterflies. 

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