Split Rock Succulent &
Split Rock Succulent &
Split Rock Succulent &
Split Rock Succulent &
Split Rock Succulent &
Split Rock Succulent &
Split Rock Succulent &

The split rock succulent, known as Pleiospilos nelii mesembs, is an absolutely stunning succulent plant that belongs to the Mesembryanthemaceae family! "Mesembs" is a common term used to refer to plants in this family, which includes various succulents known for their unique adaptations to arid environments. The split rock succulent has several other common names, such as mimicry plant, cleft stone, or living rock cactus. It gets its name because its leaves split open, revealing a cleft in the center. It looks like a rock that has been split in half! 

The split rock plant and Lithops are often confused because of their striking similarities. The biggest distinction between the two is in how they blossom. Both plants bloom in the early fall, but Split Rocks produce multiple flowers in a single reproductive cycle, whereas Lithops only produces one flower at a time. The split rock succulent produces daisy-like flowers in a variety of colors, including orange, white, yellow, and magenta.

Native to South Africa, this egg-shaped succulent has two gray-green, thick, fleshy leaves that cleft down the center. New leaves grow at right angles to the split.It can typically grow up to 4 inches tall and 8 inches wide. This split rock plant also comes in the lovely Pleiospilos nelii "Royal flush" variety, which has deep purple to reddish foliage. 

In terms of propagation, split rock plants can be propagated through seeds or by dividing the offsets that grow from the base of the parent plant. Additionally, this split rock is a friendly plant for both humans and pets, making it a popular choice among plant enthusiasts. 

Watering Needs

When it comes to watering split rock succulents, it's important to remember that they have lower water needs than other succulents. These rock plants are adapted to arid environments, so they prefer infrequent watering. It's best to allow the soil to dry out completely between waterings to prevent overwatering, which can lead to root rot or bursting your concrete leaf plant. 

One helpful tip is to use the "soak and dry" method. This means thoroughly watering your split rock plant until water drains out of the bottom of the pot through drainage holes, and then waiting for the soil to dry out completely before watering again. This helps mimic the natural rainfall patterns these succulents are accustomed to. Remember, it's always better to go underwater than to overwater when it comes to split rock succulents! 

In addition to monitoring the soil moisture, it's also important to consider the environmental conditions. During the active growing season, which is typically spring and summer, split rock succulents may require more frequent watering. However, during the dormant period in fall and winter, they require less water. 

Remember, a healthy Split Rock typically has two sets of leaves. If it develops more than two sets or shows cracking on its epidermis, it's time to stop watering. Avoid watering for at least a week if you notice these signs. 

Light Requirements

When it comes to light requirements, split rock succulents thrive in partial shade to full sun. They prefer a sunny spot where they can receive ample sunlight, but it's important to protect them from intense, direct sunlight, especially during the hottest parts of the day. 

A great location for split rock succulents is near a south or east-facing window, where they can receive bright, filtered light throughout the day. Consider purchasing grow lights if your Split Rock can't get enough light from a south-facing window or any other location. These can provide the necessary light intensity and duration for healthy growth. Just make sure to position the lights at an appropriate distance from the plants to avoid burning or overheating. 

Remember, each plant is unique, so it's important to observe your split rock succulents and adjust the lighting conditions accordingly.

Optimal Soil & Fertilizer Needs 

When it comes to soil and fertilizer needs, split rock plants prefer a well-drained soil mix specifically formulated for succulents. This type of soil allows excess water to flow out easily, preventing root rot. You can find pre-made succulent soil mixes at your local garden center, or you can create your own by combining equal parts of potting soil, perlite, and coarse sand.

Here at Planet Desert, we have a specialty-formulated succulent potting mix that contains 5 natural substrates and organic mycorrhizae to promote the development of a strong root system that helps your succulent to thrive. 

As for fertilizing, Pleiospilos nelii split rock succulents have low nutrient requirements. It's best to use a balanced natural NPK fertilizer specifically formulated for succulents, and only apply once a year during the active growing season, which is typically early spring. Remember, it's better to under-fertilize than to over-fertilize, as excessive nutrients can harm these plants. 

In general, it's important to avoid overfeeding split rock succulents, as they are adapted to nutrient-poor environments. Too much fertilizer can lead to weak growth and other problems. Always monitor the health and growth of your plants and adjust the fertilization routine as needed. If the leaves start turning yellow or the rock plant appears stressed, it may be a sign of nutrient imbalance or over-fertilization. 

Hardiness Zone & More

Split rock succulents are typically indoor plants and generally hardy in USDA hardiness zones 9 to 11. They thrive in warm climates and can tolerate temperatures ranging from 50°F to 85°F. If you live in a region with extreme temperatures or higher humidity levels, you can still grow split rock succulents indoors or in a controlled environment, such as a greenhouse or terrarium, where you can maintain the ideal conditions for their growth. Just remember to monitor the temperature and humidity levels to ensure they stay within the recommended range. 

In terms of humidity, the rock plants are adapted to arid conditions and prefer low to moderate humidity levels. They can tolerate dry air and do not require high levels of humidity. In fact, excessive humidity can increase the risk of fungal diseases and rot. It's best to provide good air circulation around the split rock to prevent moisture buildup. 

Don't miss out on adding the Pleiospilos nelii - Split rock succulent to your garden! Order now and enjoy its beauty for years to come. 

Bloom Season Fall
Botanical Name Pleiospilos nelii 'mesembs'
Common Name Split rock, mimicry plant, cleft stone, living rock cactus
Dormancy Winter
Family Aizoaceae
Flower Color Orange, white, yellow, magenta
Genus Pleiospilos
Growth Habit Egg shaped
Growth Rate Slow
Hardiness Zone 9, 10, 11
Mature Size 4 in. tall, 8 in. wide
Native Area South Africa
Plant Type Flowering succulent
Propagation By offsets, seeds
Resistance Drought tolerant, deer resistant, heat tolerant, pest resistant
Soil PH 6.5, Acidic, Neutral
Soil Type Welldrained sandy soil
Special Features Dwarf stemless succulent, showy flower
Sun Exposure Full sun, Partial shade
Toxicity Safe for humans, friendly to dogs, friendly to cats
Watering Needs Low

Pests & Common Problems of Split Rock Succulent

Split rock succulents can be susceptible to a few pests and common problems. Here are some points to keep in mind: 

Overwatering: One of the most common problems is overwatering, which can lead to root rot and bursting of rock plants. Between waterings, it's crucial to let the soil completely dry out. 

Mealybugs: These small, white, cotton-like insects can infest split rock. They feed on plant sap and can cause damage if not controlled. Use a cotton swab dipped in rubbing alcohol to remove them or consider using an organic insecticidal soap. 

Aphids: These tiny insects can cluster on the leaves and stems of split rock, sucking sap and causing distortion or discoloration. You can try spraying the affected areas with a mixture of water and mild dish soap to control them. 

Sunburn: Split rock succulents are adapted to bright light, but intense, direct sunlight can cause sunburn, leading to brown or discolored patches on the leaves. Provide them with bright, indirect light or provide shade during the hottest part of the day. 

Remember to regularly inspect your split rock succulents for any signs of pests or problems and take appropriate measures to address them promptly. 

FAQs - Split Rock Succulent Plant

How do you take care of a split rock plant? 

To care for a split rock plant provides it with partial shade to full sunlight for at least 4-6 hours daily. Water them sparingly during summer, allowing soil to dry out between waterings and reduce the watering during winter.  

Use a well-drained soil mix, including perlite or sand, to prevent root rot. 

Keep the plant warm between 50°F and 85°F, protecting it from extremely cold temperatures or frost.  

Fertilize your split rock plant with a balanced natural fertilizer formulated for succulents once a year in the growing season. Propagate split rock plants through division or seeds, gently separate offsets, and address pests promptly.  

Is Split Rock succulent rare? 

Pleiospilos nelii, also known as split rock succulents, is an uncommon but not rare species of succulent. They are popular among succulent plant enthusiasts and can be found in many plant nurseries and online shops.  

However, they do have unique and interesting characteristics that make them a fascinating addition to any succulent collection. 

How much sun does a split rock need? 

Split rock succulents thrive in partial shade to full sun but need protection from direct sunlight. A good location is near a south or east-facing window.  

Grow lights can provide adequate light intensity and duration for healthy growth of its gray-green leaves but be careful not to overheat or burn. Observe and adjust lighting conditions as each plant is unique. They'll be happy basking in the gentle glow of sunlight! 

How much water does Pleiospilos nelii need? 

Pleiospilos nelii, or the split rock plant, doesn't require frequent watering. It's a succulent that can tolerate drought conditions or can survive long periods of drought. To care for it, you'll want to let the soil dry out completely between waterings.  

This means waiting until the soil is completely dry before giving it a drink. In the summer, when it is actively growing, water it sparingly; during the winter, when it is dormant, water it less. Overwatering can be harmful, so it's best to water sparingly and only when necessary.

What is the difference between Lithops and split rock?

Lithops and split rock are both types of succulent plants known for their unique and fascinating appearances. However, there are some key differences between the two.  The biggest distinction between the two is in how they blossom.

Both plants bloom in the early fall, but Split Rocks produce multiple flowers in a single reproductive cycle, whereas Lithops only produces one flower at a time. The split rock succulent produces daisy-like flowers in a variety of colors, including orange, white, yellow, and magenta.   

Additionally, lithops have a rounded shape, resembling small pebbles or stones, while split rock plants have a distinct leaf that cleft down the center. 

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Split Rock Succulent 'Pleiospilos nelii' mesembs

sku: 200

30 reviews
Regular price$ 10.99
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Please note: All Landscape Ready plants that are in a 6-inch pot or larger WILL NOT come with a pot as it will be shipped bare root.

  • In stock, ready to ship
  • Inventory on the way

Please note: Our large plants are many years old, and as a result, they might have minor scaring but will arrive 100% healthy and looking great.

Please note: Our large plants are shipped bare root. They are also many years old, and as a result, they might have minor scaring but will arrive healthy and looking great.

If you live in a cold climate and are expecting temperatures below 40 degrees within the next five days after placing your order, we highly recommend adding a heat pack to your order. If you do not order a heat pack, we do not send one with your order.

BUY HEAT PACKS HERE

**FREE HEAT PACK WITH ORDERS OVER $50 before taxes and shipping- BY REQUEST ONLY, PLEASE MAKE A NOTE ON YOUR ORDER.

To prevent plants from freezing while in transit, orders placed for areas with extreme severe freezing temperatures will be held for shipment until it is safe to ship.

Plants that are in 3.5" pots and smaller will be shipped in its pot to prevent any damage to the roots. Any plant that is 6" and larger WILL NOT come with a pot as it will be shipped bare root.

Depending on the species and season, you will receive a very similar plant to the one in the picture. It may or may not be blooming at the time of your purchase.

We ship via USPS Priority Mail, and we calculate the shipping cost based on the weight and volume of your purchase. Care instructions are included in every package you order. Please allow us up to 3 business days to process your order. Depending on your location, we will ship the plants on a certain day to avoid transit time during weekends or holidays. If you wish to receive your order on a specific date, or have special instructions, please add a note on your order. If you have any questions or comments, please feel free to contact us at any time.

  • Description
  • Key Plant Features

The split rock succulent, known as Pleiospilos nelii mesembs, is an absolutely stunning succulent plant that belongs to the Mesembryanthemaceae family! "Mesembs" is a common term used to refer to plants in this family, which includes various succulents known for their unique adaptations to arid environments. The split rock succulent has several other common names, such as mimicry plant, cleft stone, or living rock cactus. It gets its name because its leaves split open, revealing a cleft in the center. It looks like a rock that has been split in half! 

The split rock plant and Lithops are often confused because of their striking similarities. The biggest distinction between the two is in how they blossom. Both plants bloom in the early fall, but Split Rocks produce multiple flowers in a single reproductive cycle, whereas Lithops only produces one flower at a time. The split rock succulent produces daisy-like flowers in a variety of colors, including orange, white, yellow, and magenta.

Native to South Africa, this egg-shaped succulent has two gray-green, thick, fleshy leaves that cleft down the center. New leaves grow at right angles to the split.It can typically grow up to 4 inches tall and 8 inches wide. This split rock plant also comes in the lovely Pleiospilos nelii "Royal flush" variety, which has deep purple to reddish foliage. 

In terms of propagation, split rock plants can be propagated through seeds or by dividing the offsets that grow from the base of the parent plant. Additionally, this split rock is a friendly plant for both humans and pets, making it a popular choice among plant enthusiasts. 

Watering Needs

When it comes to watering split rock succulents, it's important to remember that they have lower water needs than other succulents. These rock plants are adapted to arid environments, so they prefer infrequent watering. It's best to allow the soil to dry out completely between waterings to prevent overwatering, which can lead to root rot or bursting your concrete leaf plant. 

One helpful tip is to use the "soak and dry" method. This means thoroughly watering your split rock plant until water drains out of the bottom of the pot through drainage holes, and then waiting for the soil to dry out completely before watering again. This helps mimic the natural rainfall patterns these succulents are accustomed to. Remember, it's always better to go underwater than to overwater when it comes to split rock succulents! 

In addition to monitoring the soil moisture, it's also important to consider the environmental conditions. During the active growing season, which is typically spring and summer, split rock succulents may require more frequent watering. However, during the dormant period in fall and winter, they require less water. 

Remember, a healthy Split Rock typically has two sets of leaves. If it develops more than two sets or shows cracking on its epidermis, it's time to stop watering. Avoid watering for at least a week if you notice these signs. 

Light Requirements

When it comes to light requirements, split rock succulents thrive in partial shade to full sun. They prefer a sunny spot where they can receive ample sunlight, but it's important to protect them from intense, direct sunlight, especially during the hottest parts of the day. 

A great location for split rock succulents is near a south or east-facing window, where they can receive bright, filtered light throughout the day. Consider purchasing grow lights if your Split Rock can't get enough light from a south-facing window or any other location. These can provide the necessary light intensity and duration for healthy growth. Just make sure to position the lights at an appropriate distance from the plants to avoid burning or overheating. 

Remember, each plant is unique, so it's important to observe your split rock succulents and adjust the lighting conditions accordingly.

Optimal Soil & Fertilizer Needs 

When it comes to soil and fertilizer needs, split rock plants prefer a well-drained soil mix specifically formulated for succulents. This type of soil allows excess water to flow out easily, preventing root rot. You can find pre-made succulent soil mixes at your local garden center, or you can create your own by combining equal parts of potting soil, perlite, and coarse sand.

Here at Planet Desert, we have a specialty-formulated succulent potting mix that contains 5 natural substrates and organic mycorrhizae to promote the development of a strong root system that helps your succulent to thrive. 

As for fertilizing, Pleiospilos nelii split rock succulents have low nutrient requirements. It's best to use a balanced natural NPK fertilizer specifically formulated for succulents, and only apply once a year during the active growing season, which is typically early spring. Remember, it's better to under-fertilize than to over-fertilize, as excessive nutrients can harm these plants. 

In general, it's important to avoid overfeeding split rock succulents, as they are adapted to nutrient-poor environments. Too much fertilizer can lead to weak growth and other problems. Always monitor the health and growth of your plants and adjust the fertilization routine as needed. If the leaves start turning yellow or the rock plant appears stressed, it may be a sign of nutrient imbalance or over-fertilization. 

Hardiness Zone & More

Split rock succulents are typically indoor plants and generally hardy in USDA hardiness zones 9 to 11. They thrive in warm climates and can tolerate temperatures ranging from 50°F to 85°F. If you live in a region with extreme temperatures or higher humidity levels, you can still grow split rock succulents indoors or in a controlled environment, such as a greenhouse or terrarium, where you can maintain the ideal conditions for their growth. Just remember to monitor the temperature and humidity levels to ensure they stay within the recommended range. 

In terms of humidity, the rock plants are adapted to arid conditions and prefer low to moderate humidity levels. They can tolerate dry air and do not require high levels of humidity. In fact, excessive humidity can increase the risk of fungal diseases and rot. It's best to provide good air circulation around the split rock to prevent moisture buildup. 

Don't miss out on adding the Pleiospilos nelii - Split rock succulent to your garden! Order now and enjoy its beauty for years to come. 

Bloom Season Fall
Botanical Name Pleiospilos nelii 'mesembs'
Common Name Split rock, mimicry plant, cleft stone, living rock cactus
Dormancy Winter
Family Aizoaceae
Flower Color Orange, white, yellow, magenta
Genus Pleiospilos
Growth Habit Egg shaped
Growth Rate Slow
Hardiness Zone 9, 10, 11
Mature Size 4 in. tall, 8 in. wide
Native Area South Africa
Plant Type Flowering succulent
Propagation By offsets, seeds
Resistance Drought tolerant, deer resistant, heat tolerant, pest resistant
Soil PH 6.5, Acidic, Neutral
Soil Type Welldrained sandy soil
Special Features Dwarf stemless succulent, showy flower
Sun Exposure Full sun, Partial shade
Toxicity Safe for humans, friendly to dogs, friendly to cats
Watering Needs Low

Pests & Common Problems of Split Rock Succulent

Split rock succulents can be susceptible to a few pests and common problems. Here are some points to keep in mind: 

Overwatering: One of the most common problems is overwatering, which can lead to root rot and bursting of rock plants. Between waterings, it's crucial to let the soil completely dry out. 

Mealybugs: These small, white, cotton-like insects can infest split rock. They feed on plant sap and can cause damage if not controlled. Use a cotton swab dipped in rubbing alcohol to remove them or consider using an organic insecticidal soap. 

Aphids: These tiny insects can cluster on the leaves and stems of split rock, sucking sap and causing distortion or discoloration. You can try spraying the affected areas with a mixture of water and mild dish soap to control them. 

Sunburn: Split rock succulents are adapted to bright light, but intense, direct sunlight can cause sunburn, leading to brown or discolored patches on the leaves. Provide them with bright, indirect light or provide shade during the hottest part of the day. 

Remember to regularly inspect your split rock succulents for any signs of pests or problems and take appropriate measures to address them promptly. 

FAQs - Split Rock Succulent Plant

How do you take care of a split rock plant? 

To care for a split rock plant provides it with partial shade to full sunlight for at least 4-6 hours daily. Water them sparingly during summer, allowing soil to dry out between waterings and reduce the watering during winter.  

Use a well-drained soil mix, including perlite or sand, to prevent root rot. 

Keep the plant warm between 50°F and 85°F, protecting it from extremely cold temperatures or frost.  

Fertilize your split rock plant with a balanced natural fertilizer formulated for succulents once a year in the growing season. Propagate split rock plants through division or seeds, gently separate offsets, and address pests promptly.  

Is Split Rock succulent rare? 

Pleiospilos nelii, also known as split rock succulents, is an uncommon but not rare species of succulent. They are popular among succulent plant enthusiasts and can be found in many plant nurseries and online shops.  

However, they do have unique and interesting characteristics that make them a fascinating addition to any succulent collection. 

How much sun does a split rock need? 

Split rock succulents thrive in partial shade to full sun but need protection from direct sunlight. A good location is near a south or east-facing window.  

Grow lights can provide adequate light intensity and duration for healthy growth of its gray-green leaves but be careful not to overheat or burn. Observe and adjust lighting conditions as each plant is unique. They'll be happy basking in the gentle glow of sunlight! 

How much water does Pleiospilos nelii need? 

Pleiospilos nelii, or the split rock plant, doesn't require frequent watering. It's a succulent that can tolerate drought conditions or can survive long periods of drought. To care for it, you'll want to let the soil dry out completely between waterings.  

This means waiting until the soil is completely dry before giving it a drink. In the summer, when it is actively growing, water it sparingly; during the winter, when it is dormant, water it less. Overwatering can be harmful, so it's best to water sparingly and only when necessary.

What is the difference between Lithops and split rock?

Lithops and split rock are both types of succulent plants known for their unique and fascinating appearances. However, there are some key differences between the two.  The biggest distinction between the two is in how they blossom.

Both plants bloom in the early fall, but Split Rocks produce multiple flowers in a single reproductive cycle, whereas Lithops only produces one flower at a time. The split rock succulent produces daisy-like flowers in a variety of colors, including orange, white, yellow, and magenta.   

Additionally, lithops have a rounded shape, resembling small pebbles or stones, while split rock plants have a distinct leaf that cleft down the center. 

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