Aloe Tree - Aloidendron barberae bainesii
Aloe Tree - Aloidendron barberae bainesii
Aloe Tree - Aloidendron barberae bainesii
Aloe Tree - Aloidendron barberae bainesii
Aloe Tree - Aloidendron barberae bainesii
Aloe Tree - Aloidendron barberae bainesii
Aloe Tree - Aloidendron barberae bainesii
Aloe Tree - Aloidendron barberae bainesii
Aloe Tree - Aloidendron barberae bainesii
Aloe Tree - Aloidendron barberae bainesii
Aloe Tree - Aloidendron barberae bainesii
Aloe Tree - Aloidendron barberae bainesii
Aloe Tree - Aloidendron barberae bainesii
Aloe Tree - Aloidendron barberae bainesii
Aloe Tree - Aloidendron barberae bainesii
Aloe Tree - Aloidendron barberae bainesii
Aloe Tree - Aloidendron barberae bainesii
Aloe Tree - Aloidendron barberae bainesii
Aloe Tree - Aloidendron barberae bainesii
Aloe Tree - Aloidendron barberae bainesii
Aloe Tree - Aloidendron barberae bainesii
Aloe Tree - Aloidendron barberae bainesii
Aloe Tree - Aloidendron barberae bainesii

Are you on the lookout for a striking and low-maintenance aloe plant to elevate your garden? Look no further than the Aloe Tree, known as Aloidendron barberae (formerly known as Aloe bainesii or Aloe barberae). Hailing all the way from South Africa, it gets its common name, "tree aloe," because of its tall and tree-like growth habit.  

This aloe tree is one of Africa's largest-growing aloe plants, which can grow up to 30 feet in height, resembling a tree. This distinguishes it from other aloe species that have a more compact and rosette-like growth form. It features a thick-gray-smooth trunk with a grayish-brown bark that becomes rough and textured as it matures. This Aloe bainesii has a neat, rounded crown of long, narrow, deeply channeled, curved, and toothed leaves that are arranged in rosettes at the top of the trunk. 

The stunning flowers are one of the most remarkable aspects of the aloe tree. During the winter months, it produces tall, branching inflorescences that are covered in vibrant red or orange tubular flowers. These flowers attract pollinators like birds and bees, adding to the aloe plant's overall beauty.

Aloe tree propagation can be done through various methods such as seed germination, stem cuttings, or division of offsets. Overall, the Aloe tree is a versatile aloe plant with medicinal properties, attractive stems, and succulent leaves, suitable for treating burns, cuts, and skin irritations. 

Watering Needs

When it comes to watering the aloe tree, it's important to strike a balance. This succulent is known for its ability to tolerate drought conditions, so it doesn't require frequent watering. Always err on the side of underwatering because overwatering can cause root rot and other problems. 

A good rule of thumb is to water the Tree Aloe deeply but infrequently. In order to avoid waterlogged conditions, allow the soil to completely dry out between waterings; during the summer months, when your Aloe barberae is actively growing, you can water it every 2-3 weeks. In the winter, when growth slows down, you can reduce watering to once a month or even less. 

Remember, it's always better to underwater than overwater the Tree Aloe. Pay attention to the aloe plant's leaves and overall appearance. If the leaves start to look shriveled or wrinkled, it may be a sign that the plant needs water. Adjust your watering schedule accordingly, and your Tree Aloe will thrive! 

Light Requirement

The Aloe bainesii tree aloe thrives in full sun, making it a sun-loving plant. It requires bright, direct sunlight for at least 6 hours a day to maintain its health and vibrant appearance. Placing it in a location with ample sunlight will help promote optimal growth and flowering. 

If you're growing the Tree Aloe indoors, make sure to place it near a sunny window where it can receive plenty of sunlight. Alternatively, you can use grow lights to supplement the natural light and provide the necessary brightness for your aloe tree plant.

While the Tree Aloe can tolerate some shade, it may not grow as vigorously or produce as many flowers. Insufficient light can cause it to become leggy and weak. Therefore, it's best to provide it with as much direct sunlight as possible to ensure its overall well-being. 

Optimal Soil & Fertilizer Needs

When it comes to the soil and fertilizer needs of the Aloe barberae, it's important to provide it with well-drained soil. A sandy or loamy soil mix is ideal for this succulent. It allows excess water to drain away, preventing the roots from sitting in water and potentially rotting. Too much water and BAM! You've got root and stem rot faster than you can say "cactus." That's why we at Planet Desert have got your back with ours specialized succulent potting mix. This will help mimic the natural conditions that the Tree Aloe prefers. 

As for fertilizing, the Tree Aloe doesn't require frequent or heavy feeding. Aloe plants are generally low maintenance when it comes to fertilization. You can use a balanced natural fertilizer specifically formulated for succulents with an equal dose of NPK. During the active growing season, which is typically spring, you can fertilize the Aloe tree once a month. In the dormant season, reduce or stop fertilizing altogether as the plant's growth slows down. 

Remember, providing well-draining soil and occasional fertilization will help keep your Tree Aloe healthy and thriving! 

Hardiness Zone & More

The Aloe tree is native to the warm regions of South Africa and is known for its ability to tolerate hot and dry conditions. It is typically hardy in USDA hardiness zones 9 to 11, which means it can withstand minimum temperatures of 20 to 40 degrees Fahrenheit. 

In terms of temperature preferences, the Tree Aloe thrives in warm climates. It can tolerate temperatures as high as 100 degrees Fahrenheit but may experience some stress if exposed to prolonged extreme heat. It is important to protect your aloe trees from frost and freezing temperatures, as it is not frost-tolerant. 

As for humidity, the Tree Aloe is adapted to arid and semi-arid environments, so it prefers low to moderate humidity levels. It can handle dry air and does not require high humidity to thrive. However, it is important to provide adequate moisture to the aloe tree roots, especially during the growing season, to ensure their overall health. 

With the help of Aloe barberae – Aloe tree, you'll start to spend less time maintaining your garden and more time taking in its beauty! 

Bloom Season Winter
Botanical Name Aloidendron barberae
Common Name Tree aloe, Aloe trees
Dormancy Winter
Family Asphodelaceae
Flower Color Red, orange
Genus Aloidendron
Growth Habit Rosette
Growth Rate Fast
Hardiness Zone 9, 10, 11
Mature Size Up to 30 ft. tall
Native Area South Africa
Plant Type Succulent, tree
Propagation By stem cuttings, divisions, offsets
Resistance Drought tolerant, heat resistant, pest resistant, deer resistant
Soil PH 6.5, Acidic, Neutral
Soil Type specialized succulent potting mix.
Special Features Africa's largest aloe
Sun Exposure Full sun, partial shade
Toxicity Safe for humans, safe for pets
Watering Needs Low

Pests & Common Problems of Aloe Tree

The Aloe tree is generally a resilient succulent plant, but it can still face a few common problems and pests. Here are some points to keep in mind:

Aphids: These tiny insects can sometimes infest the aloe trees, sucking sap from the leaves and causing damage. Regularly inspect the plant for signs of aphids and treat them with a suitable insecticide if necessary. 

Mealybugs: Mealybugs are another common pest that can affect the Aloe barberae. They appear as white, cotton-like clusters on the leaves. Use insecticidal soap or a cotton swab dipped in rubbing alcohol to remove them. 

Scale insects: Scale insects can attach themselves to the stems and leaves of the Aloes tree, sucking sap and causing damage. Use a soft brush or a cotton swab dipped in rubbing alcohol to remove them. 

Overwatering: Excessive watering can cause root rot and other fungal illnesses. Between waterings, the soil needs to be given time to dry out. 

Underwatering: While the Aloe tree is drought-tolerant, prolonged periods of drought can cause the aloe plant's leaves to become dry and shriveled. Watering should be done on a regular basis, especially during hot and dry weather. 

Sunburn: The Aloe tree prefers full sun, but intense and prolonged exposure to direct sunlight can cause sunburn on its leaves.  

Remember, regular monitoring, proper watering, and timely pest control measures can help keep your Aloe tree healthy and free from common problems. 

FAQs - Aloe Tree Plant

What is aloe tree used for? 

Tree Aloe (Aloe bainesii) is a versatile and valuable plant with a striking appearance and medicinal properties. Its tall stem and succulent leaves make it a visually appealing addition to gardens and landscapes as it grows into a large tree.  

The gel found inside its leaves is known for its soothing and healing properties, making it suitable for treating burns, cuts, and skin irritations. Additionally, its leaves can be used in traditional practices to create a bitter tonic with digestive and detoxifying properties.  

Overall, Tree Aloe serves both decorative and practical purposes, making it a versatile and valuable plant. 

How fast does an aloe tree grow? 

The Tree Aloe (Aloe bainesii) is a relatively fast-growing plant. It typically grows at a moderate pace to 30 feet tall, with an average growth rate of about 4 to 12 inches per year.  

However, the actual growth rate can vary depending on various factors such as environmental conditions, care, and maintenance. Patience is key when it comes to the Tree Aloe's growth, but its unique beauty makes it worth the wait!

Do Aloe trees bear flowers? 

Yes, the Tree Aloe (Aloe bainesii) does flower. It produces tall, striking flower spikes that can reach up to 10 feet in height. The flowers are typically orange or red in color and attract pollinators such as birds and bees. The flowering season for the Tree Aloe is usually in late winter or early spring, adding a beautiful touch to its already impressive appearance. 

Where do Aloe trees grow? 

 Aloe trees primarily grow in arid and semi-arid regions, where they can tolerate drought and high temperatures; the eastern part of southern Africa, including the Eastern Cape, KwaZulu-Natal, eastern Swaziland, Mpumalanga (Barberton District), and southern Mozambique, where it is found in evergreen and dry deciduous forest margins.  

They are also found in other parts of the world with similar climates, including Australia, Mexico, and some areas of the United States, as ornamental plants as long as they are provided with the right conditions, such as well-draining soil and plenty of sunlight. 

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Aloe Tree - Aloidendron barberae bainesii

sku: 2822

Regular price$ 134.99
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Size
Height: 24"-28"
Diameter: 20"-24"
Height: 44" - 48"
Diameter: 36" - 39"

Please note: All Landscape Ready plants that are in a 6-inch pot or larger WILL NOT come with a pot as it will be shipped bare root.

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  • Inventory on the way

Please note: Our large plants are many years old, and as a result, they might have minor scaring but will arrive 100% healthy and looking great.

Please note: Our large plants are shipped bare root. They are also many years old, and as a result, they might have minor scaring but will arrive healthy and looking great.

sku:
Detailed description of this plant is below...

If you live in a cold climate and are expecting temperatures below 40 degrees within the next five days after placing your order, we highly recommend adding a heat pack to your order. If you do not order a heat pack, we do not send one with your order.

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**FREE HEAT PACK WITH ORDERS OVER $50 before taxes and shipping- BY REQUEST ONLY, PLEASE MAKE A NOTE ON YOUR ORDER.

To prevent plants from freezing while in transit, orders placed for areas with extreme severe freezing temperatures will be held for shipment until it is safe to ship.

FREE SHIPPING ON ALL ORDERS OVER $89 in the
Continental US.

Plants that are in 3.5" pots and smaller will be shipped in its pot to prevent any damage to the roots.

Any plant that is 6" and larger WILL NOT come with a pot as it will be shipped bare root.

Depending on the species and season, you will receive a very similar plant to the one in the picture. It may or may not be blooming at the time of your purchase.

We ship via USPS Priority Mail, If you don't get Free Shipping, then we calculate the shipping cost based on the weight and volume of your purchase.

Care instructions are included in every package you order. Please allow us up to 3 business days to process your order. Depending on your location, we will ship the plants on a certain day to avoid transit time during weekends or holidays. If you wish to receive your order on a specific date, or have special instructions, please add a note on your order. If you have any questions or comments, please feel free to contact us at any time.

  • Description
  • Key Plant Features

Are you on the lookout for a striking and low-maintenance aloe plant to elevate your garden? Look no further than the Aloe Tree, known as Aloidendron barberae (formerly known as Aloe bainesii or Aloe barberae). Hailing all the way from South Africa, it gets its common name, "tree aloe," because of its tall and tree-like growth habit.  

This aloe tree is one of Africa's largest-growing aloe plants, which can grow up to 30 feet in height, resembling a tree. This distinguishes it from other aloe species that have a more compact and rosette-like growth form. It features a thick-gray-smooth trunk with a grayish-brown bark that becomes rough and textured as it matures. This Aloe bainesii has a neat, rounded crown of long, narrow, deeply channeled, curved, and toothed leaves that are arranged in rosettes at the top of the trunk. 

The stunning flowers are one of the most remarkable aspects of the aloe tree. During the winter months, it produces tall, branching inflorescences that are covered in vibrant red or orange tubular flowers. These flowers attract pollinators like birds and bees, adding to the aloe plant's overall beauty.

Aloe tree propagation can be done through various methods such as seed germination, stem cuttings, or division of offsets. Overall, the Aloe tree is a versatile aloe plant with medicinal properties, attractive stems, and succulent leaves, suitable for treating burns, cuts, and skin irritations. 

Watering Needs

When it comes to watering the aloe tree, it's important to strike a balance. This succulent is known for its ability to tolerate drought conditions, so it doesn't require frequent watering. Always err on the side of underwatering because overwatering can cause root rot and other problems. 

A good rule of thumb is to water the Tree Aloe deeply but infrequently. In order to avoid waterlogged conditions, allow the soil to completely dry out between waterings; during the summer months, when your Aloe barberae is actively growing, you can water it every 2-3 weeks. In the winter, when growth slows down, you can reduce watering to once a month or even less. 

Remember, it's always better to underwater than overwater the Tree Aloe. Pay attention to the aloe plant's leaves and overall appearance. If the leaves start to look shriveled or wrinkled, it may be a sign that the plant needs water. Adjust your watering schedule accordingly, and your Tree Aloe will thrive! 

Light Requirement

The Aloe bainesii tree aloe thrives in full sun, making it a sun-loving plant. It requires bright, direct sunlight for at least 6 hours a day to maintain its health and vibrant appearance. Placing it in a location with ample sunlight will help promote optimal growth and flowering. 

If you're growing the Tree Aloe indoors, make sure to place it near a sunny window where it can receive plenty of sunlight. Alternatively, you can use grow lights to supplement the natural light and provide the necessary brightness for your aloe tree plant.

While the Tree Aloe can tolerate some shade, it may not grow as vigorously or produce as many flowers. Insufficient light can cause it to become leggy and weak. Therefore, it's best to provide it with as much direct sunlight as possible to ensure its overall well-being. 

Optimal Soil & Fertilizer Needs

When it comes to the soil and fertilizer needs of the Aloe barberae, it's important to provide it with well-drained soil. A sandy or loamy soil mix is ideal for this succulent. It allows excess water to drain away, preventing the roots from sitting in water and potentially rotting. Too much water and BAM! You've got root and stem rot faster than you can say "cactus." That's why we at Planet Desert have got your back with ours specialized succulent potting mix. This will help mimic the natural conditions that the Tree Aloe prefers. 

As for fertilizing, the Tree Aloe doesn't require frequent or heavy feeding. Aloe plants are generally low maintenance when it comes to fertilization. You can use a balanced natural fertilizer specifically formulated for succulents with an equal dose of NPK. During the active growing season, which is typically spring, you can fertilize the Aloe tree once a month. In the dormant season, reduce or stop fertilizing altogether as the plant's growth slows down. 

Remember, providing well-draining soil and occasional fertilization will help keep your Tree Aloe healthy and thriving! 

Hardiness Zone & More

The Aloe tree is native to the warm regions of South Africa and is known for its ability to tolerate hot and dry conditions. It is typically hardy in USDA hardiness zones 9 to 11, which means it can withstand minimum temperatures of 20 to 40 degrees Fahrenheit. 

In terms of temperature preferences, the Tree Aloe thrives in warm climates. It can tolerate temperatures as high as 100 degrees Fahrenheit but may experience some stress if exposed to prolonged extreme heat. It is important to protect your aloe trees from frost and freezing temperatures, as it is not frost-tolerant. 

As for humidity, the Tree Aloe is adapted to arid and semi-arid environments, so it prefers low to moderate humidity levels. It can handle dry air and does not require high humidity to thrive. However, it is important to provide adequate moisture to the aloe tree roots, especially during the growing season, to ensure their overall health. 

With the help of Aloe barberae – Aloe tree, you'll start to spend less time maintaining your garden and more time taking in its beauty! 

Bloom Season Winter
Botanical Name Aloidendron barberae
Common Name Tree aloe, Aloe trees
Dormancy Winter
Family Asphodelaceae
Flower Color Red, orange
Genus Aloidendron
Growth Habit Rosette
Growth Rate Fast
Hardiness Zone 9, 10, 11
Mature Size Up to 30 ft. tall
Native Area South Africa
Plant Type Succulent, tree
Propagation By stem cuttings, divisions, offsets
Resistance Drought tolerant, heat resistant, pest resistant, deer resistant
Soil PH 6.5, Acidic, Neutral
Soil Type specialized succulent potting mix.
Special Features Africa's largest aloe
Sun Exposure Full sun, partial shade
Toxicity Safe for humans, safe for pets
Watering Needs Low

Pests & Common Problems of Aloe Tree

The Aloe tree is generally a resilient succulent plant, but it can still face a few common problems and pests. Here are some points to keep in mind:

Aphids: These tiny insects can sometimes infest the aloe trees, sucking sap from the leaves and causing damage. Regularly inspect the plant for signs of aphids and treat them with a suitable insecticide if necessary. 

Mealybugs: Mealybugs are another common pest that can affect the Aloe barberae. They appear as white, cotton-like clusters on the leaves. Use insecticidal soap or a cotton swab dipped in rubbing alcohol to remove them. 

Scale insects: Scale insects can attach themselves to the stems and leaves of the Aloes tree, sucking sap and causing damage. Use a soft brush or a cotton swab dipped in rubbing alcohol to remove them. 

Overwatering: Excessive watering can cause root rot and other fungal illnesses. Between waterings, the soil needs to be given time to dry out. 

Underwatering: While the Aloe tree is drought-tolerant, prolonged periods of drought can cause the aloe plant's leaves to become dry and shriveled. Watering should be done on a regular basis, especially during hot and dry weather. 

Sunburn: The Aloe tree prefers full sun, but intense and prolonged exposure to direct sunlight can cause sunburn on its leaves.  

Remember, regular monitoring, proper watering, and timely pest control measures can help keep your Aloe tree healthy and free from common problems. 

FAQs - Aloe Tree Plant

What is aloe tree used for? 

Tree Aloe (Aloe bainesii) is a versatile and valuable plant with a striking appearance and medicinal properties. Its tall stem and succulent leaves make it a visually appealing addition to gardens and landscapes as it grows into a large tree.  

The gel found inside its leaves is known for its soothing and healing properties, making it suitable for treating burns, cuts, and skin irritations. Additionally, its leaves can be used in traditional practices to create a bitter tonic with digestive and detoxifying properties.  

Overall, Tree Aloe serves both decorative and practical purposes, making it a versatile and valuable plant. 

How fast does an aloe tree grow? 

The Tree Aloe (Aloe bainesii) is a relatively fast-growing plant. It typically grows at a moderate pace to 30 feet tall, with an average growth rate of about 4 to 12 inches per year.  

However, the actual growth rate can vary depending on various factors such as environmental conditions, care, and maintenance. Patience is key when it comes to the Tree Aloe's growth, but its unique beauty makes it worth the wait!

Do Aloe trees bear flowers? 

Yes, the Tree Aloe (Aloe bainesii) does flower. It produces tall, striking flower spikes that can reach up to 10 feet in height. The flowers are typically orange or red in color and attract pollinators such as birds and bees. The flowering season for the Tree Aloe is usually in late winter or early spring, adding a beautiful touch to its already impressive appearance. 

Where do Aloe trees grow? 

 Aloe trees primarily grow in arid and semi-arid regions, where they can tolerate drought and high temperatures; the eastern part of southern Africa, including the Eastern Cape, KwaZulu-Natal, eastern Swaziland, Mpumalanga (Barberton District), and southern Mozambique, where it is found in evergreen and dry deciduous forest margins.  

They are also found in other parts of the world with similar climates, including Australia, Mexico, and some areas of the United States, as ornamental plants as long as they are provided with the right conditions, such as well-draining soil and plenty of sunlight. 

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