Aloe Hercules
Aloe Hercules
Aloe Hercules
Aloe Hercules
Aloe Hercules
Aloe Hercules
Aloe Hercules
Aloe Hercules
Aloe Hercules
Aloe Hercules
Aloe Hercules
Aloe Hercules
Aloe Hercules
Aloe Hercules
Aloe Hercules
Aloe Hercules
Aloe Hercules

I ntroducing the Aloe Hercules, also known as the Hercules Aloe or the Spotted Aloe, which is a stunning succulent plant that belongs to the Aloe  genus. It is a popular hybrid aloe with smaller Quiver Tree Aloe dichotoma and large Tree Aloe Aloidendron barberae.

Native to South Africa, the Aloe Hercules has a straight trunk crowned with thick branches. Hercules, a legendary Greek hero, was renowned for his strength and bravery, and the name "Aloe Hercules" embodies his potency and strength, symbolizing his heroic legacy. 

Unlike many other aloes, which tend to be smaller in stature, the Hercules Aloe can grow to be quite large. This Hercules aloe tree can grow up to 40 feet tall and 20 feet wide in the wild.  

The Aloe Hercules has thick, fleshy, broad, and triangular, blue-green leaves. These leaves are arranged in a rosette formation, growing in a spiral pattern from the center of your Hercules aloe. When it reaches maturity, the lower aloe leaves fall off, revealing a tree trunk at the base and a long, green, succulent leaf crown at the top. 

The tubular flowers of Aloe Hercules appear in shades of orange or red with tall flower spikes during the spring and fall. These vibrant blooms attract pollinators such as bees and butterflies, adding a splash of color to the surrounding environment. 

While Aloe Hercules is a beautiful plant to admire, it's important to note that Aloe Hercules can be mildly toxic to humans and pets if consumed. The gel-like sap found in the leaves can cause skin irritation or allergic reactions in some individuals. It is advised to handle your Hercules Aloe with care and keep it out of the reach of children and pets. 

Additionally, you can propagate the Aloe Hercules through leaf cuttings or offsets. Select a healthy leaf, let it callus over for a few days, and then place it in a well-draining soil mix. Keep the soil lightly moist until the new plantlets emerge. 

Watering Needs 

Like other succulents, the Aloe Hercules stores water in its thick, fleshy leaves. As a result, it is more tolerant of drought conditions than being overwatered. Overwatering can lead to root rot and other issues. 

To ensure the health and well-being of your Aloe Hercules, it's best to follow a "soak and dry" watering method. This means that when you water your Hercules aloe, you should thoroughly saturate the soil, allowing the excess water to drain out from the bottom of the pot. However, it's crucial to let the soil dry out completely between watering sessions. 

During the Spring and summer, in the growing season, the Aloe Hercules typically requires watering every 2-3 weeks. However, it's essential to adjust the watering schedule based on the environmental conditions and the moisture level of the soil. During the fall and winter, the Hercules aloe water needs decrease, so you can reduce the frequency of watering to once a month or even less. 

Remember, it's always better to underwater than overwater your Aloe Hercules. Keep an eye on the leaves - if they start to appear shriveled or wrinkled, it's a sign that your succulent plant needs water. Meanwhile, if the leaves become mushy or discolored, it may indicate overwatering. 

Light Requirements

When it comes to growing the Aloe Hercules indoors, it thrives in bright, indirect light. Place it near a window where it can receive ample sunlight throughout the day. However, be careful not to expose it to direct, intense sunlight for extended periods, as it can scorch the leaves. If you notice the leaves turning brown or yellow, it may be a sign that your Hercules aloe is receiving too much direct sunlight.  

If you're considering growing your Aloe Hercules outdoors, it's important to note that it can tolerate full sun to partial shade. It can handle more direct sunlight compared to indoors. Ideally, place it in a location where it will receive at least six hours of sunlight per day. However, if you live in a region with intense and scorching sunlight, providing some afternoon shade can help protect your aloe plant from excessive heat and sunburn. 

Remember, when transitioning your Aloe Hercules from indoors to outdoors or vice versa, it's crucial to acclimate it gradually to the new light conditions. Sudden changes in light exposure can shock Aloe Hercules and cause stress. Start by placing it in a shaded area outdoors or a spot with less direct light indoors, and gradually increase the exposure over a few weeks. 

Optimal Soil & Fertilizer Needs 

Aloe Hercules prefers sandy, well-drained soil, as excess moisture can promote root and stem rot. Planet Desert specializes in succulents and has specialized succulent potting soil that includes an organic substrate with mycorrhizae to help with the growth of a healthy root system to help your succulents thrive. As an okay alternative, you can create your own potting mix by combining equal portions of perlite, coarse sand, and good natural potting soil.  

When it comes to fertilizing, Aloe Hercules is not a heavy feeder, so it doesn't require frequent fertilization. During the growing season, which typically spans from spring, you can fertilize your plant once a year. Choose a balanced, water-soluble NPK fertilizer specifically formulated for succulents. Apply the fertilizer at half-strength to the soil. This gentle feeding will provide the necessary nutrients for your Aloe Hercules to thrive. 

However, it's important to note that during the dormant season, which usually occurs in fall and winter, you should refrain from fertilizing your Aloe Hercules. During this time, Hercules aloe naturally slows down its growth, and fertilizing can actually be detrimental. So, give your Aloe Hercules a break during the dormant season and resume fertilization when it starts actively growing again in spring. 

Hardiness Zone & More 

If you are growing your Aloe Hercules indoors, it thrives in warm conditions. It prefers temperatures between 65°F to 80°F during the day. The Aloe Hercules is adaptable and can tolerate a range of humidity levels. The Hercules Aloe can handle both dry and moderately humid environments. However, it's important to ensure good air circulation around the plant to prevent any issues with fungal diseases.  

If you are living in USDA zones 9-11, you can grow your Aloe Hercules outdoors year-round. It can tolerate slightly cooler temperatures at night, but it's best to avoid prolonged exposure to temperatures below 50°F, as it may damage your Hercules aloe. These zones have milder climates with warmer temperatures throughout the year, which are ideal for the growth and survival of this succulent. 

The Bottom Line 

Overall, the Aloe Hercules is a captivating succulent with its large size, unique spotted leaves, and striking flower spikes. With the right care and attention, it can be a stunning addition to any garden or indoor plant collection. Just remember to handle it with caution and enjoy its beauty from a safe distance. It thrives in warm climates, typically found in hardiness zones 9 to 11. It prefers temperatures between 65°F to 80°F during the day and can tolerate a range of humidity levels. When it comes to propagation, you can either use offsets or leaf cuttings to grow new plants. Just remember to provide well-draining soil and be patient as the new plants establish themselves. With the right care, the Aloe Hercules can be a stunning addition to any succulent collection. Give this succulent a try if you're looking for a low-maintenance Aloe Hercules for sale! 

Bloom Season Spring, Fall
Botanical Name Aloe Hercules
Common Name Hercules Aloe, tree aloe
Dormancy Winter
Family Xanthorrhoeaceae
Flower Color Orange, red
Genus Aloe
Growth Habit Rosette
Growth Rate Fast
Hardiness Zone 9, 10, 11
Mature Size 40 ft. tall, 20 ft. wide
Native Area South Africa
Plant Type Succulent
Propagation By leaf cuttings, offsets
Resistance Drought tolerant, pest resistance, heat tolerant
Soil PH 6.5, Acidic, Neutral
Soil Type specialized succulent potting soil
Special Features Easy to grow
Sun Exposure Full sun, partial shade
Toxicity Mildly toxic for humans, mildly toxic for pets
Watering Needs Low

Pests & Common Problems of Aloe Hercules

Aloe Hercules is generally a hardy succulent plant, but like any other succulent plant, it can still face some common problems and pests. Here are the most common: 

Mealybugs: These small, white, cotton-like insects can infest the leaves and stems of your Aloe Hercules. They suck sap from succulents, causing yellowing and wilting. To treat them, you can wipe them off with a cotton swab dipped in rubbing alcohol or use an insecticidal soap. 

Scale insects: These pests appear as small, brown, or black bumps on the leaves and stems. They also feed on the sap, leading to yellowing and stunted growth. You can manually remove them with a cotton swab dipped in rubbing alcohol or use insecticidal soap. 

Root rot: Overwatering or poorly draining soil can lead to root rot in Aloe Hercules. This can turn the roots mushy and black. To prevent this, make sure the soil dries out between waterings and use a well-draining soil mix. 

Sunburn: Aloe Hercules can get sunburned if exposed to intense, direct sunlight for too long. This can result in brown or yellow spots on the leaves. To prevent sunburn, provide partial shade or move the Aloe Hercules to a location with filtered sunlight. 

Leaf discoloration: If the leaves of your Aloe Hercules turn yellow or brown, it could be a sign of overwatering, underwatering, or nutrient deficiencies. Adjust your watering schedule and ensure the plant is getting adequate sunlight and nutrients. 

Remember, early detection and prompt action are key to managing these pests and problems. Regularly inspect your Aloe Hercules and provide it with the right care to keep it healthy and thriving. 

FAQs of Aloe Hercules 

How fast does Hercules Aloe grow? 

Hercules Aloe is known for its rapid growth rate, making it one of the fastest-growing succulents. Under optimal conditions, it can grow up to a foot per year. Additionally, its growth rate may vary depending on factors such as sunlight exposure, soil quality, and watering frequency.  

How do you take care of Hercules Aloe? 

When it comes to caring for your Hercules Aloe, make sure to place your Aloe Hercules in a location with bright, indirect sunlight. It enjoys warm temperatures, ideally between 60 to 80 degrees Fahrenheit. When you do water, make sure to thoroughly soak the soil and then let it drain completely.  

As for soil, a well-draining mix specifically formulated for succulents works best. Fertilize sparingly, using a balanced liquid fertilizer diluted to half strength during the growing season. Lastly, keep an eye out for any pests, such as mealybugs or aphids, and treat them promptly if necessary. 

How often do you water Aloe Hercules? 

Aloe Hercules, a drought-tolerant succulent, requires a "soak and dry" watering method to ensure its health. Watering should be done every 2–3 weeks during the growing season but can be adjusted based on environmental conditions and soil moisture levels.  

Watering should be done once a month or less during the fall and winter. It's better to be underwater than overwater and monitor the leaves for signs of water needs.

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Aloe Hercules

sku: 2658

Regular price$ 14.79
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Please note: All Landscape Ready plants that are in a 6-inch pot or larger WILL NOT come with a pot as it will be shipped bare root.

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  • Inventory on the way

Please note: Our large plants are many years old, and as a result, they might have minor scaring but will arrive 100% healthy and looking great.

Please note: Our large plants are shipped bare root. They are also many years old, and as a result, they might have minor scaring but will arrive healthy and looking great.

If you live in a cold climate and are expecting temperatures below 40 degrees within the next five days after placing your order, we highly recommend adding a heat pack to your order. If you do not order a heat pack, we do not send one with your order.

BUY HEAT PACKS HERE

**FREE HEAT PACK WITH ORDERS OVER $50 before taxes and shipping- BY REQUEST ONLY, PLEASE MAKE A NOTE ON YOUR ORDER.

To prevent plants from freezing while in transit, orders placed for areas with extreme severe freezing temperatures will be held for shipment until it is safe to ship.

Plants that are in 3.5" pots and smaller will be shipped in its pot to prevent any damage to the roots. Any plant that is 6" and larger WILL NOT come with a pot as it will be shipped bare root.

Depending on the species and season, you will receive a very similar plant to the one in the picture. It may or may not be blooming at the time of your purchase.

We ship via USPS Priority Mail, and we calculate the shipping cost based on the weight and volume of your purchase. Care instructions are included in every package you order. Please allow us up to 3 business days to process your order. Depending on your location, we will ship the plants on a certain day to avoid transit time during weekends or holidays. If you wish to receive your order on a specific date, or have special instructions, please add a note on your order. If you have any questions or comments, please feel free to contact us at any time.

  • Description
  • Key Plant Features

I ntroducing the Aloe Hercules, also known as the Hercules Aloe or the Spotted Aloe, which is a stunning succulent plant that belongs to the Aloe  genus. It is a popular hybrid aloe with smaller Quiver Tree Aloe dichotoma and large Tree Aloe Aloidendron barberae.

Native to South Africa, the Aloe Hercules has a straight trunk crowned with thick branches. Hercules, a legendary Greek hero, was renowned for his strength and bravery, and the name "Aloe Hercules" embodies his potency and strength, symbolizing his heroic legacy. 

Unlike many other aloes, which tend to be smaller in stature, the Hercules Aloe can grow to be quite large. This Hercules aloe tree can grow up to 40 feet tall and 20 feet wide in the wild.  

The Aloe Hercules has thick, fleshy, broad, and triangular, blue-green leaves. These leaves are arranged in a rosette formation, growing in a spiral pattern from the center of your Hercules aloe. When it reaches maturity, the lower aloe leaves fall off, revealing a tree trunk at the base and a long, green, succulent leaf crown at the top. 

The tubular flowers of Aloe Hercules appear in shades of orange or red with tall flower spikes during the spring and fall. These vibrant blooms attract pollinators such as bees and butterflies, adding a splash of color to the surrounding environment. 

While Aloe Hercules is a beautiful plant to admire, it's important to note that Aloe Hercules can be mildly toxic to humans and pets if consumed. The gel-like sap found in the leaves can cause skin irritation or allergic reactions in some individuals. It is advised to handle your Hercules Aloe with care and keep it out of the reach of children and pets. 

Additionally, you can propagate the Aloe Hercules through leaf cuttings or offsets. Select a healthy leaf, let it callus over for a few days, and then place it in a well-draining soil mix. Keep the soil lightly moist until the new plantlets emerge. 

Watering Needs 

Like other succulents, the Aloe Hercules stores water in its thick, fleshy leaves. As a result, it is more tolerant of drought conditions than being overwatered. Overwatering can lead to root rot and other issues. 

To ensure the health and well-being of your Aloe Hercules, it's best to follow a "soak and dry" watering method. This means that when you water your Hercules aloe, you should thoroughly saturate the soil, allowing the excess water to drain out from the bottom of the pot. However, it's crucial to let the soil dry out completely between watering sessions. 

During the Spring and summer, in the growing season, the Aloe Hercules typically requires watering every 2-3 weeks. However, it's essential to adjust the watering schedule based on the environmental conditions and the moisture level of the soil. During the fall and winter, the Hercules aloe water needs decrease, so you can reduce the frequency of watering to once a month or even less. 

Remember, it's always better to underwater than overwater your Aloe Hercules. Keep an eye on the leaves - if they start to appear shriveled or wrinkled, it's a sign that your succulent plant needs water. Meanwhile, if the leaves become mushy or discolored, it may indicate overwatering. 

Light Requirements

When it comes to growing the Aloe Hercules indoors, it thrives in bright, indirect light. Place it near a window where it can receive ample sunlight throughout the day. However, be careful not to expose it to direct, intense sunlight for extended periods, as it can scorch the leaves. If you notice the leaves turning brown or yellow, it may be a sign that your Hercules aloe is receiving too much direct sunlight.  

If you're considering growing your Aloe Hercules outdoors, it's important to note that it can tolerate full sun to partial shade. It can handle more direct sunlight compared to indoors. Ideally, place it in a location where it will receive at least six hours of sunlight per day. However, if you live in a region with intense and scorching sunlight, providing some afternoon shade can help protect your aloe plant from excessive heat and sunburn. 

Remember, when transitioning your Aloe Hercules from indoors to outdoors or vice versa, it's crucial to acclimate it gradually to the new light conditions. Sudden changes in light exposure can shock Aloe Hercules and cause stress. Start by placing it in a shaded area outdoors or a spot with less direct light indoors, and gradually increase the exposure over a few weeks. 

Optimal Soil & Fertilizer Needs 

Aloe Hercules prefers sandy, well-drained soil, as excess moisture can promote root and stem rot. Planet Desert specializes in succulents and has specialized succulent potting soil that includes an organic substrate with mycorrhizae to help with the growth of a healthy root system to help your succulents thrive. As an okay alternative, you can create your own potting mix by combining equal portions of perlite, coarse sand, and good natural potting soil.  

When it comes to fertilizing, Aloe Hercules is not a heavy feeder, so it doesn't require frequent fertilization. During the growing season, which typically spans from spring, you can fertilize your plant once a year. Choose a balanced, water-soluble NPK fertilizer specifically formulated for succulents. Apply the fertilizer at half-strength to the soil. This gentle feeding will provide the necessary nutrients for your Aloe Hercules to thrive. 

However, it's important to note that during the dormant season, which usually occurs in fall and winter, you should refrain from fertilizing your Aloe Hercules. During this time, Hercules aloe naturally slows down its growth, and fertilizing can actually be detrimental. So, give your Aloe Hercules a break during the dormant season and resume fertilization when it starts actively growing again in spring. 

Hardiness Zone & More 

If you are growing your Aloe Hercules indoors, it thrives in warm conditions. It prefers temperatures between 65°F to 80°F during the day. The Aloe Hercules is adaptable and can tolerate a range of humidity levels. The Hercules Aloe can handle both dry and moderately humid environments. However, it's important to ensure good air circulation around the plant to prevent any issues with fungal diseases.  

If you are living in USDA zones 9-11, you can grow your Aloe Hercules outdoors year-round. It can tolerate slightly cooler temperatures at night, but it's best to avoid prolonged exposure to temperatures below 50°F, as it may damage your Hercules aloe. These zones have milder climates with warmer temperatures throughout the year, which are ideal for the growth and survival of this succulent. 

The Bottom Line 

Overall, the Aloe Hercules is a captivating succulent with its large size, unique spotted leaves, and striking flower spikes. With the right care and attention, it can be a stunning addition to any garden or indoor plant collection. Just remember to handle it with caution and enjoy its beauty from a safe distance. It thrives in warm climates, typically found in hardiness zones 9 to 11. It prefers temperatures between 65°F to 80°F during the day and can tolerate a range of humidity levels. When it comes to propagation, you can either use offsets or leaf cuttings to grow new plants. Just remember to provide well-draining soil and be patient as the new plants establish themselves. With the right care, the Aloe Hercules can be a stunning addition to any succulent collection. Give this succulent a try if you're looking for a low-maintenance Aloe Hercules for sale! 

Bloom Season Spring, Fall
Botanical Name Aloe Hercules
Common Name Hercules Aloe, tree aloe
Dormancy Winter
Family Xanthorrhoeaceae
Flower Color Orange, red
Genus Aloe
Growth Habit Rosette
Growth Rate Fast
Hardiness Zone 9, 10, 11
Mature Size 40 ft. tall, 20 ft. wide
Native Area South Africa
Plant Type Succulent
Propagation By leaf cuttings, offsets
Resistance Drought tolerant, pest resistance, heat tolerant
Soil PH 6.5, Acidic, Neutral
Soil Type specialized succulent potting soil
Special Features Easy to grow
Sun Exposure Full sun, partial shade
Toxicity Mildly toxic for humans, mildly toxic for pets
Watering Needs Low

Pests & Common Problems of Aloe Hercules

Aloe Hercules is generally a hardy succulent plant, but like any other succulent plant, it can still face some common problems and pests. Here are the most common: 

Mealybugs: These small, white, cotton-like insects can infest the leaves and stems of your Aloe Hercules. They suck sap from succulents, causing yellowing and wilting. To treat them, you can wipe them off with a cotton swab dipped in rubbing alcohol or use an insecticidal soap. 

Scale insects: These pests appear as small, brown, or black bumps on the leaves and stems. They also feed on the sap, leading to yellowing and stunted growth. You can manually remove them with a cotton swab dipped in rubbing alcohol or use insecticidal soap. 

Root rot: Overwatering or poorly draining soil can lead to root rot in Aloe Hercules. This can turn the roots mushy and black. To prevent this, make sure the soil dries out between waterings and use a well-draining soil mix. 

Sunburn: Aloe Hercules can get sunburned if exposed to intense, direct sunlight for too long. This can result in brown or yellow spots on the leaves. To prevent sunburn, provide partial shade or move the Aloe Hercules to a location with filtered sunlight. 

Leaf discoloration: If the leaves of your Aloe Hercules turn yellow or brown, it could be a sign of overwatering, underwatering, or nutrient deficiencies. Adjust your watering schedule and ensure the plant is getting adequate sunlight and nutrients. 

Remember, early detection and prompt action are key to managing these pests and problems. Regularly inspect your Aloe Hercules and provide it with the right care to keep it healthy and thriving. 

FAQs of Aloe Hercules 

How fast does Hercules Aloe grow? 

Hercules Aloe is known for its rapid growth rate, making it one of the fastest-growing succulents. Under optimal conditions, it can grow up to a foot per year. Additionally, its growth rate may vary depending on factors such as sunlight exposure, soil quality, and watering frequency.  

How do you take care of Hercules Aloe? 

When it comes to caring for your Hercules Aloe, make sure to place your Aloe Hercules in a location with bright, indirect sunlight. It enjoys warm temperatures, ideally between 60 to 80 degrees Fahrenheit. When you do water, make sure to thoroughly soak the soil and then let it drain completely.  

As for soil, a well-draining mix specifically formulated for succulents works best. Fertilize sparingly, using a balanced liquid fertilizer diluted to half strength during the growing season. Lastly, keep an eye out for any pests, such as mealybugs or aphids, and treat them promptly if necessary. 

How often do you water Aloe Hercules? 

Aloe Hercules, a drought-tolerant succulent, requires a "soak and dry" watering method to ensure its health. Watering should be done every 2–3 weeks during the growing season but can be adjusted based on environmental conditions and soil moisture levels.  

Watering should be done once a month or less during the fall and winter. It's better to be underwater than overwater and monitor the leaves for signs of water needs.

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