Green African Milk Tree - Euphorbia trigona &
Green African Milk Tree - Euphorbia trigona &
Green African Milk Tree - Euphorbia trigona &
Green African Milk Tree - Euphorbia trigona &
Green African Milk Tree - Euphorbia trigona &
Green African Milk Tree - Euphorbia trigona &
Green African Milk Tree - Euphorbia trigona &
Green African Milk Tree - Euphorbia trigona &
Green African Milk Tree - Euphorbia trigona &
Green African Milk Tree - Euphorbia trigona &
Green African Milk Tree - Euphorbia trigona &
Green African Milk Tree - Euphorbia trigona &
Green African Milk Tree - Euphorbia trigona &
Green African Milk Tree - Euphorbia trigona &
Green African Milk Tree - Euphorbia trigona &
Green African Milk Tree - Euphorbia trigona &
Green African Milk Tree - Euphorbia trigona &
Green African Milk Tree - Euphorbia trigona &
Green African Milk Tree - Euphorbia trigona &
Green African Milk Tree - Euphorbia trigona &
Green African Milk Tree - Euphorbia trigona &
Green African Milk Tree - Euphorbia trigona &
Green African Milk Tree - Euphorbia trigona &
Green African Milk Tree - Euphorbia trigona &
Green African Milk Tree - Euphorbia trigona &
Green African Milk Tree - Euphorbia trigona &
Green African Milk Tree - Euphorbia trigona &
Green African Milk Tree - Euphorbia trigona &
Green African Milk Tree - Euphorbia trigona &
Green African Milk Tree - Euphorbia trigona &
Green African Milk Tree - Euphorbia trigona &
Green African Milk Tree - Euphorbia trigona &

Get ready for a wild and vibrant journey into the world of the Green African Milk Tree, known as Euphorbia trigona 'Green'! Native to Central Africa, this extraordinary plant is all about fast growth and vibrant foliage.  

The African milk tree also known as the African milk bush plant. The Trigona refers to the triangular shape of the stems with three distinct sides, resembling a triangle (if it has four sides, you may have a Euphorbia Acrurensis instead). 


This Euphorbia plant is a hybrid between a cactus and a succulent plant, like many others in the Euphorbia genus yet it exhibits characteristics of both.

Its thorny and water storing stem gives it a cactus-like appearance that earned it nicknames like African milk tree cactus, candelabra cactus, cathedral cactus, friendship cactus, and good luck cactus.

But it's not really a cactus at all; it's a succulent plant! It's easy to unintentionally treat it like a cactus,

which can cause problems for new owners, but if you follow our care recommendations further below, you'll be fine.

With its triangular, upright, columnar stems adorned with ridges peppered with thorns and tear-drop-shaped leaves that stay lush green throughout the growing season, the African milk tree grows up to 9 feet tall. However, indoors they'll keep things more compact but still incredibly impressive.

The flowers of the African milk tree bloom during the spring and summer, under bright sunlight. These flowers are typically small and white, attracting pollinators such as bees and butterflies.

Additionally, propagating an African milk tree can be easily done through stem cuttings. The African milk tree, Euphorbia trigona, is named for its milky white latex sap, which resembles milk. This sap serves as a defense mechanism against herbivores but can be toxic and irritating, so avoid contact and handle the plant with care. 

This Euphorbia trigona also has a stunning Euphorbia trigona 'Rubra' or Royal Red variety with bright red foliage that comes late in the season. 

Watering Needs

Like other Euphorbia plants, the African milk tree, a drought-tolerant is adapted to survive in harsh hot environments, storing water in its stems for months at a time. 

Remember, if there is a severe drought or you forget to water them for over a couple of months during the summer then it can lead to discoloration and a shriveling look as it consumes more of the water in its interior.

During summer you should only water them once every 3-4 weeks at the most. Do not water them unless the soil is dry to a depth of 1-2 inches.   In the fall and winter, the African milk tree plant goes into a dormant phase. During this time the Euphorbia plant growth slows down, and it may lose some of its leaves or shrink in size. Additionally, the cooler temperatures and short days of fall and winter can trigger the plant to enter dormancy, as these conditions are less favorable for growth.

The Green Trigona will resume its growth and water requirements once the weather warms up and the days get longer. When you water them, the most important thing is to take care not to overwater them as this wet soil can lead to root rot and fungal infections.

Light Requirements 

When growing indoors, this African milk tree loves bright, indirect sunlight. It thrives in a spot where it can receive plenty of bright, filtered sunlight throughout the day. Placing this indoor plant near a window that gets a good amount of natural light is ideal. However, be cautious not to expose it to direct sunlight, as it can scorch the leaves. 

When growing outdoors, the Euphorbia trigona green can tolerate some periods of direct sunlight, especially during morning or evening hours, but it's best to avoid prolonged exposure to intense sunlight. If you notice the leaves of your African succulent turning yellow or brown, it could be a sign that it's getting too much direct light. 

Remember to rotate the plant occasionally to ensure even light distribution to all sides. This will help prevent your Euphorbia trigona from leaning or growing unevenly toward the light source. 

Optimal Soil & Fertilizer Needs

The Euphorbia trigona prefers sandy soil that drains well. Planting them in ordinary soil will result in compacted roots, stunted growth, and most likely root rot. Instead, make or buy a well-draining potting mix, or ideally use our specialized potting mix that contains organic mycorrhizae to promote the development of a strong root system that helps your succulent to thrive. 

Natural fertilizers with an equal ratio of NPK (5-10-5) are the best choice as they last longer and keep your soil alive by adding other beneficial compounds and microbes that encourage African milk tree plants health and nutrient absorption. So, skip those harsh chemicals and give your Euphorbia trigona succulent some love with a good natural fertilizer.

Pro Tip

Using a porous clay pot that hasn't been glazed, will absorb excess water and reduce the risk of overwatering.

Hardiness Zone & More

When growing indoor, this plant prefers warm temperatures ranging from 60°F to 75°F. It's important to avoid extreme temperature fluctuations and drafts, as they can stress the plant. It may not tolerate cold temperatures well, so it's important to protect it from frost and cold drafts. It's important to avoid extreme temperature fluctuations and keep it away from cold drafts or hot, dry air.

For outdoor cultivation, the Euphorbia trigona is generally suited for zones 9 to 11. These zones typically experience mild to warm climates throughout the year. The plant can withstand temperatures as low as 25°F, but it's best to protect it from freezing temperatures and frost. If you live in a colder region, it's recommended to keep this plant indoors or provide it with proper protection during winter.

In terms of humidity, the Euphorbia trigona is adaptable and can tolerate a range of humidity levels. It can thrive in average household humidity, but it's important to avoid excessively dry conditions. If the air in your home is particularly dry, especially during winter months or in arid climates, you can increase humidity around the plant by using a humidifier or placing a tray of water near it. 

Final Thoughts

Overall, the Euphorbia trigona (African milk tree) is a unique and fascinating plant. Its distinctive features include tall, branching stems with triangular sections and sharp spines. This plant adds a touch of exotic beauty to any indoor or outdoor space. When it comes to care, it prefers bright, indirect light and well-draining soil. It can tolerate a range of temperatures but thrives in warm conditions. Remember to water it sparingly, allowing the soil to dry out between waterings. Additionally, take care to protect it from freezing temperatures and frost if you live in a colder climate. With proper care and attention, the Euphorbia trigona will reward you with its striking appearance and resilience.

We think you will love this plant order your very own Euphorbia trigona - a green healthy African Milk Tree for sale today and start enjoying its beauty in no time!

Bloom Season Spring, Summer
Botanical Name Euphorbia trigona
Common Name Green African milk tree, candelabra cactus, cathedral cactus, friendship cactus, good luck cactus
Dormancy Winter
Family Euphorbiaceae
Flower Color White
Genus Euphorbia
Growth Habit Upright, Columnar
Growth Rate Moderately fast
Hardiness Zone 9, 10, 11
Mature Size 9 ft. tall
Native Area Africa
Plant Type Perennial succulent
Propagation By stem cuttings
Resistance Drought tolerant, heat tolerant, pest resistance
Soil PH 6.5, Acidic, Neutral
Soil Type specialized succulent potting mix
Special Features Unique foliage
Sun Exposure Full sun, partial shade
Toxicity Mildly toxic for humans, mildly toxic for pets (Keeps away from Children)
Watering Needs Low

Pests & Common Problems of Green African Milk Tree

The Euphorbia trigona is susceptible to several pests and problems. These can cause damage to the plant by feeding on the leaves and stems, which can cause the plant to become weak and stressed.   

Pests attack: To prevent these pests from infesting your African milk tree, it is important to keep the plant in a clean environment and avoid overwatering, as this can create a humid environment that is conducive to pest infestations. If pests are present, they can be treated with insecticidal soap or neem oil, which are effective at killing pests without harming the succulent plant.   

Rot: It can also be a problem for the African milk tree, as it can cause the roots and stems to rot. To prevent this problem, it is important to plant the succulent in well-draining soil and to avoid watering it too frequently.   

Yellowing of leaves: A common sign of root rot is the yellowing of leaves, which eventually drop off. These are also signs of a plant that doesn't get enough bright light. The leaves will be yellow if your soil has been dry, especially in the winter. For a few days, leave the plant outside in the sun for about six hours each day, and it will heal.

Powdery Mildew: Powdery mildew is a white and moldy disease that can be caused by poor air circulation and humidity. To remove it without damaging the plant, dissolve one tablespoon of baking soda into a gallon of water and wash the plant with a baking soda mixture.

Frequently
Asked Questions

  • Why is it called an African milk tree? 

    The Euphorbia trigona is known as the African milk tree because of its milky white latex sap that oozes out when the plant is cut or injured. This sap resembles the color and consistency of milk, hence earning the tree its name.  Additionally, this unique feature of the African milk tree is not only visually striking but also serves as a defense mechanism against herbivores, as the sap contains toxic compounds that deter animals from feeding on it. However, it's important to note that the sap of Euphorbia plants can be toxic and irritating, so it's best to avoid contact with it and handle the plant with care.

  • Can you eat African milk trees? 

    No, it is not recommended to eat African milk trees (Euphorbia trigona). The milky sap of Euphorbia plants, including the African milk tree, can be toxic and irritating if ingested. It's best to enjoy the beauty of the plant and not consume it.

  • Where do African milk trees grow? 

    African milk trees, also known as Euphorbia trigona, are native to the tropical regions of Africa. They are commonly found in countries such as Ethiopia, Kenya, and Tanzania. These drought-tolerant plants enjoy warm climates and are often grown as houseplants in other parts of the world.

  • Is Euphorbia trigona an indoor or outdoor plant?

    The Euphorbia trigona, also known as the African milk tree, can be grown both indoor plants and outdoor plants. It is commonly kept as a houseplant in many regions because it thrives in warm temperatures and can be sensitive to cold.  However, in areas with a suitable climate in USDA zone 9-11, it can also be grown outdoors as a landscape plant. So, whether you choose to keep it indoors or outdoors depends on your specific location and the conditions you can provide.

  • Is Euphorbia trigona a good luck plant? 

    Yes, Euphorbia trigona, also known as the African milk tree, is considered a symbol of good luck in Chinese culture. It is believed to bring positive energy and prosperity to the home. However, it's important to note that the concept of "good luck" can vary among different cultures and individuals. Ultimately, the meaning and significance of plants can be subjective and personal. So, if you find joy and positivity in having the African milk tree, it can certainly be a good luck plant for you!

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Green African Milk Tree - Euphorbia trigona 'Green'

sku: 2796

1 review
Regular price$ 36.75
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Size
Height: 11-13"
Diameter:
Height: 19"-21"
Diameter:
Height: 30" -32"
Diameter: 10" - 12"

Please note: All Landscape Ready plants that are in a 6-inch pot or larger WILL NOT come with a pot as it will be shipped bare root.

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  • Inventory on the way

Please note: Our large plants are many years old, and as a result, they might have minor scaring but will arrive 100% healthy and looking great.

Please note: Our large plants are shipped bare root. They are also many years old, and as a result, they might have minor scaring but will arrive healthy and looking great.

sku:
Detailed description of this plant is below...

If you live in a cold climate and are expecting temperatures below 40 degrees within the next five days after placing your order, we highly recommend adding a heat pack to your order. If you do not order a heat pack, we do not send one with your order.

BUY HEAT PACKS HERE

**FREE HEAT PACK WITH ORDERS OVER $50 before taxes and shipping- BY REQUEST ONLY, PLEASE MAKE A NOTE ON YOUR ORDER.

To prevent plants from freezing while in transit, orders placed for areas with extreme severe freezing temperatures will be held for shipment until it is safe to ship.

FREE SHIPPING ON ALL ORDERS OVER $89 in the
Continental US.

Plants that are in 3.5" pots and smaller will be shipped in its pot to prevent any damage to the roots.

Any plant that is 6" and larger WILL NOT come with a pot as it will be shipped bare root.

Depending on the species and season, you will receive a very similar plant to the one in the picture. It may or may not be blooming at the time of your purchase.

We ship via USPS Priority Mail, If you don't get Free Shipping, then we calculate the shipping cost based on the weight and volume of your purchase.

Care instructions are included in every package you order. Please allow us up to 3 business days to process your order. Depending on your location, we will ship the plants on a certain day to avoid transit time during weekends or holidays. If you wish to receive your order on a specific date, or have special instructions, please add a note on your order. If you have any questions or comments, please feel free to contact us at any time.

  • Description
  • Key Plant Features

Get ready for a wild and vibrant journey into the world of the Green African Milk Tree, known as Euphorbia trigona 'Green'! Native to Central Africa, this extraordinary plant is all about fast growth and vibrant foliage.  

The African milk tree also known as the African milk bush plant. The Trigona refers to the triangular shape of the stems with three distinct sides, resembling a triangle (if it has four sides, you may have a Euphorbia Acrurensis instead). 


This Euphorbia plant is a hybrid between a cactus and a succulent plant, like many others in the Euphorbia genus yet it exhibits characteristics of both.

Its thorny and water storing stem gives it a cactus-like appearance that earned it nicknames like African milk tree cactus, candelabra cactus, cathedral cactus, friendship cactus, and good luck cactus.

But it's not really a cactus at all; it's a succulent plant! It's easy to unintentionally treat it like a cactus,

which can cause problems for new owners, but if you follow our care recommendations further below, you'll be fine.

With its triangular, upright, columnar stems adorned with ridges peppered with thorns and tear-drop-shaped leaves that stay lush green throughout the growing season, the African milk tree grows up to 9 feet tall. However, indoors they'll keep things more compact but still incredibly impressive.

The flowers of the African milk tree bloom during the spring and summer, under bright sunlight. These flowers are typically small and white, attracting pollinators such as bees and butterflies.

Additionally, propagating an African milk tree can be easily done through stem cuttings. The African milk tree, Euphorbia trigona, is named for its milky white latex sap, which resembles milk. This sap serves as a defense mechanism against herbivores but can be toxic and irritating, so avoid contact and handle the plant with care. 

This Euphorbia trigona also has a stunning Euphorbia trigona 'Rubra' or Royal Red variety with bright red foliage that comes late in the season. 

Watering Needs

Like other Euphorbia plants, the African milk tree, a drought-tolerant is adapted to survive in harsh hot environments, storing water in its stems for months at a time. 

Remember, if there is a severe drought or you forget to water them for over a couple of months during the summer then it can lead to discoloration and a shriveling look as it consumes more of the water in its interior.

During summer you should only water them once every 3-4 weeks at the most. Do not water them unless the soil is dry to a depth of 1-2 inches.   In the fall and winter, the African milk tree plant goes into a dormant phase. During this time the Euphorbia plant growth slows down, and it may lose some of its leaves or shrink in size. Additionally, the cooler temperatures and short days of fall and winter can trigger the plant to enter dormancy, as these conditions are less favorable for growth.

The Green Trigona will resume its growth and water requirements once the weather warms up and the days get longer. When you water them, the most important thing is to take care not to overwater them as this wet soil can lead to root rot and fungal infections.

Light Requirements 

When growing indoors, this African milk tree loves bright, indirect sunlight. It thrives in a spot where it can receive plenty of bright, filtered sunlight throughout the day. Placing this indoor plant near a window that gets a good amount of natural light is ideal. However, be cautious not to expose it to direct sunlight, as it can scorch the leaves. 

When growing outdoors, the Euphorbia trigona green can tolerate some periods of direct sunlight, especially during morning or evening hours, but it's best to avoid prolonged exposure to intense sunlight. If you notice the leaves of your African succulent turning yellow or brown, it could be a sign that it's getting too much direct light. 

Remember to rotate the plant occasionally to ensure even light distribution to all sides. This will help prevent your Euphorbia trigona from leaning or growing unevenly toward the light source. 

Optimal Soil & Fertilizer Needs

The Euphorbia trigona prefers sandy soil that drains well. Planting them in ordinary soil will result in compacted roots, stunted growth, and most likely root rot. Instead, make or buy a well-draining potting mix, or ideally use our specialized potting mix that contains organic mycorrhizae to promote the development of a strong root system that helps your succulent to thrive. 

Natural fertilizers with an equal ratio of NPK (5-10-5) are the best choice as they last longer and keep your soil alive by adding other beneficial compounds and microbes that encourage African milk tree plants health and nutrient absorption. So, skip those harsh chemicals and give your Euphorbia trigona succulent some love with a good natural fertilizer.

Pro Tip

Using a porous clay pot that hasn't been glazed, will absorb excess water and reduce the risk of overwatering.

Hardiness Zone & More

When growing indoor, this plant prefers warm temperatures ranging from 60°F to 75°F. It's important to avoid extreme temperature fluctuations and drafts, as they can stress the plant. It may not tolerate cold temperatures well, so it's important to protect it from frost and cold drafts. It's important to avoid extreme temperature fluctuations and keep it away from cold drafts or hot, dry air.

For outdoor cultivation, the Euphorbia trigona is generally suited for zones 9 to 11. These zones typically experience mild to warm climates throughout the year. The plant can withstand temperatures as low as 25°F, but it's best to protect it from freezing temperatures and frost. If you live in a colder region, it's recommended to keep this plant indoors or provide it with proper protection during winter.

In terms of humidity, the Euphorbia trigona is adaptable and can tolerate a range of humidity levels. It can thrive in average household humidity, but it's important to avoid excessively dry conditions. If the air in your home is particularly dry, especially during winter months or in arid climates, you can increase humidity around the plant by using a humidifier or placing a tray of water near it. 

Final Thoughts

Overall, the Euphorbia trigona (African milk tree) is a unique and fascinating plant. Its distinctive features include tall, branching stems with triangular sections and sharp spines. This plant adds a touch of exotic beauty to any indoor or outdoor space. When it comes to care, it prefers bright, indirect light and well-draining soil. It can tolerate a range of temperatures but thrives in warm conditions. Remember to water it sparingly, allowing the soil to dry out between waterings. Additionally, take care to protect it from freezing temperatures and frost if you live in a colder climate. With proper care and attention, the Euphorbia trigona will reward you with its striking appearance and resilience.

We think you will love this plant order your very own Euphorbia trigona - a green healthy African Milk Tree for sale today and start enjoying its beauty in no time!

Bloom Season Spring, Summer
Botanical Name Euphorbia trigona
Common Name Green African milk tree, candelabra cactus, cathedral cactus, friendship cactus, good luck cactus
Dormancy Winter
Family Euphorbiaceae
Flower Color White
Genus Euphorbia
Growth Habit Upright, Columnar
Growth Rate Moderately fast
Hardiness Zone 9, 10, 11
Mature Size 9 ft. tall
Native Area Africa
Plant Type Perennial succulent
Propagation By stem cuttings
Resistance Drought tolerant, heat tolerant, pest resistance
Soil PH 6.5, Acidic, Neutral
Soil Type specialized succulent potting mix
Special Features Unique foliage
Sun Exposure Full sun, partial shade
Toxicity Mildly toxic for humans, mildly toxic for pets (Keeps away from Children)
Watering Needs Low

Pests & Common Problems of Green African Milk Tree

The Euphorbia trigona is susceptible to several pests and problems. These can cause damage to the plant by feeding on the leaves and stems, which can cause the plant to become weak and stressed.   

Pests attack: To prevent these pests from infesting your African milk tree, it is important to keep the plant in a clean environment and avoid overwatering, as this can create a humid environment that is conducive to pest infestations. If pests are present, they can be treated with insecticidal soap or neem oil, which are effective at killing pests without harming the succulent plant.   

Rot: It can also be a problem for the African milk tree, as it can cause the roots and stems to rot. To prevent this problem, it is important to plant the succulent in well-draining soil and to avoid watering it too frequently.   

Yellowing of leaves: A common sign of root rot is the yellowing of leaves, which eventually drop off. These are also signs of a plant that doesn't get enough bright light. The leaves will be yellow if your soil has been dry, especially in the winter. For a few days, leave the plant outside in the sun for about six hours each day, and it will heal.

Powdery Mildew: Powdery mildew is a white and moldy disease that can be caused by poor air circulation and humidity. To remove it without damaging the plant, dissolve one tablespoon of baking soda into a gallon of water and wash the plant with a baking soda mixture.

Frequently
Asked Questions

  • Why is it called an African milk tree? 

    The Euphorbia trigona is known as the African milk tree because of its milky white latex sap that oozes out when the plant is cut or injured. This sap resembles the color and consistency of milk, hence earning the tree its name.  Additionally, this unique feature of the African milk tree is not only visually striking but also serves as a defense mechanism against herbivores, as the sap contains toxic compounds that deter animals from feeding on it. However, it's important to note that the sap of Euphorbia plants can be toxic and irritating, so it's best to avoid contact with it and handle the plant with care.

  • Can you eat African milk trees? 

    No, it is not recommended to eat African milk trees (Euphorbia trigona). The milky sap of Euphorbia plants, including the African milk tree, can be toxic and irritating if ingested. It's best to enjoy the beauty of the plant and not consume it.

  • Where do African milk trees grow? 

    African milk trees, also known as Euphorbia trigona, are native to the tropical regions of Africa. They are commonly found in countries such as Ethiopia, Kenya, and Tanzania. These drought-tolerant plants enjoy warm climates and are often grown as houseplants in other parts of the world.

  • Is Euphorbia trigona an indoor or outdoor plant?

    The Euphorbia trigona, also known as the African milk tree, can be grown both indoor plants and outdoor plants. It is commonly kept as a houseplant in many regions because it thrives in warm temperatures and can be sensitive to cold.  However, in areas with a suitable climate in USDA zone 9-11, it can also be grown outdoors as a landscape plant. So, whether you choose to keep it indoors or outdoors depends on your specific location and the conditions you can provide.

  • Is Euphorbia trigona a good luck plant? 

    Yes, Euphorbia trigona, also known as the African milk tree, is considered a symbol of good luck in Chinese culture. It is believed to bring positive energy and prosperity to the home. However, it's important to note that the concept of "good luck" can vary among different cultures and individuals. Ultimately, the meaning and significance of plants can be subjective and personal. So, if you find joy and positivity in having the African milk tree, it can certainly be a good luck plant for you!

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