Cheiridopsis candidissima
Cheiridopsis candidissima
Cheiridopsis candidissima
Cheiridopsis candidissima
Cheiridopsis candidissima
Cheiridopsis candidissima
Cheiridopsis candidissima
Cheiridopsis candidissima
Cheiridopsis candidissima
Cheiridopsis candidissima

Imagine stumbling upon a miniature wonderland where nature's creativity knows no bounds. Welcome to the world of the Lobster Claw plant - also known as Cheiridopsis candidissima! Because of its dense mat of spiky foliage, it is also mistakenly known as Cheiridopsis denticulata or carpet weed. 

This cheiridopsis succulent plant gets its common name, "lobster claws," from the shape of its leaves, which are thick and fleshy with pointed tips that resemble the claws of a lobster and turn reddish-purple under sunlight. 

Hailing from South Africa, it’s a member of the Aizoaceae family, which is also known as the ice plant family. It flourishes in sandy soil and dry riverbeds, sporting the most enchanting name derived from the Greek word 'cheiris,' meaning 'sleeve.' This is because when the erect, upright leaves pair begin to dry out in the summer, they resemble a protective sleeve around the succulent. It can grow up to 4 inches tall and up to 12 inches wide. 

This lobster plant is active in the winter, so when the temperature begins to fall, lobster claw flowers begin to bloom. The flowers have striking hues that range from yellow to purple. It is simple to grow from cuttings or seeds. 

Watering Needs 

The lobster claw is a drought-tolerant plant that doesn't need much water to thrive. In fact, overwatering can be detrimental to the lobster claw's plant health. As a general rule, it's best to wait until the soil is completely dry before watering your succulent plant again. This can take anywhere from a few days to a few weeks, depending on the climate and growing conditions. 

When you do water your lobster claws, it's important to water it deeply and thoroughly. This will encourage the giant lobster claw to develop a strong root system and will help it withstand periods of drought. Since they are active in the winter, they require more frequent watering when it is cold outside. However, you should avoid getting water on the leaves, as this can cause the powdery coating to rub off and can lead to rot or disease. 

Light Requirement 

The lobster claws require full sun to partial shade, making it an excellent choice for outdoor gardens or indoor spaces with plenty of natural light. It can tolerate a wide range of temperatures, but it prefers warm, dry conditions and can suffer in humid or wet environments. 

When growing Cheiridopsis candidissima indoors, it's important to place the plant in a sunny window or under a grow light to ensure it receives enough light. If this isn't getting enough light, it may become leggy or pale, and its growth may slow down. Conversely, if your lobster claw plant is getting too much direct sunlight, it may become scorched or sunburned. 

Optimal Soil & Fertilizer Needs 

The lobster claw plant prefers well-draining soil that is rich in nutrients. A sandy or gravelly soil mix is ideal, as it will allow excess water to drain away quickly and prevent the plant from becoming waterlogged. You can also improve drainage by adding perlite or coarse sand to your soil mix. Instead, make or buy a well-draining potting mix, or ideally use our specialized succulent potting mix that contains 5 natural substrates and mycorrhizae to promote the development of a strong root system that helps your succulent to thrive. 

When it comes to fertilizing Cheiridopsis candidissima, less is more. This giant lobster claw doesn't require a lot of nutrients to thrive, and over-fertilizing can actually harm its growth. You can use a balanced fertilizer once a year in the spring with an equal mix of NPK (5-10-5). 

Hardiness Zone & More 

The lobster claws can withstand temperatures as low as 20 degrees Fahrenheit and are well-suited for USDA hardiness zones 8 to 11.It thrives in cold climates because it is active during the winter. If you have mild winters, you can even put it outside.  

However, Cheiridopsis candidissima is native to South Africa and is adapted to hot, dry conditions. It can tolerate a wide range of temperatures, but it prefers warm, dry conditions and can suffer in humid or wet environments. If you're growing it indoors, make sure to place it in a spot with plenty of natural light and good air circulation to help prevent the buildup of excess moisture. 

Don't miss out on adding the Cheiridopsis candidissima - Lobster Claws to your garden! Order now and enjoy its beauty for years to come.

Bloom Season Winter
Botanical Name Cheiridopsis candidissima
Common Name Lobster claw plant
Dormancy Summer
Family Aizoaceae
Flower Color Yellow, purple
Genus Cheiridopsis
Growth Habit Rosette
Growth Rate Slow
Hardiness Zone 8, 9, 10, 11
Mature Size 4 in. tall, 12 in. wide
Native Area South Africa
Plant Type Perennial succulent
Propagation By cuttings, seeds
Resistance Drought tolerant, pest resistant, deer resistance, mild frost tolerant
Soil PH 6.5, Acidic, Neutral
Soil Type specialized succulent potting mix
Special Features Showy flowers
Sun Exposure Full sun, Partial shade
Watering Needs Low

Pests & Common Problems of Lobster Claw Plant

The lobster claw plant is a hardy plant that is generally resistant to pests and diseases. However, there are a few common problems that you may encounter when growing this succulent. Following are some of the most typical problems and solutions: 

Overwatering: Cheiridopsis candidissima is adapted to hot, dry conditions and can suffer if it's overwatered. To prevent this issue, make sure to allow the soil to dry out completely between waterings, and reduce watering the lobster claw plant during the summer months when it's dormant. 

Mealybugs: Mealybugs are a common pest that can infest Cheiridopsis. These insects look like small, white, cottony masses and can be found on the leaves and stems of the giant lobster claw.

To get rid of mealybugs, you can use a cotton swab dipped in rubbing alcohol to remove them from the lobster claw plant. 

Scale insects: Scale insects are another common pest that can infest the lobster claw plant. These insects look like small, brown , or black bumps on the leaves and stems of the plant.

To get rid of scale insects, you can use a cotton swab dipped in rubbing alcohol to remove them from the succulent. 

FAQs - Lobster Claw Plant

How do you propagate cheiridopsis? 

Cheiridopsis candidissima can be propagated from seeds or cuttings. If you're propagating from seeds, you can sow them in a well-draining soil mix and keep them moist until they germinate.

If you're propagating from cuttings, you can take stem cuttings in the spring or summer and allow them to dry out for a few days before planting them in a well-draining soil mix. Make sure to keep the soil moist until the cuttings take root. 

How tall does the lobster claw plant get? 

The lobster claws plant - Cheiridopsis candidissima can grow up to 12 inches in diameter. It can be grown in containers or in the ground in tropical climates and is often used as a decorative plant in tropical-themed settings.

The plant gets its common name, "lobster claws," from the shape of its leaves, which are thick and fleshy with pointed tips that resemble the claws of a lobster and turn reddish-purple under sunlight. 

Does the lobster claw plant like direct sunlight? 

The lobster claw plant thrives in full sun to partial shade for at least 4-6 hours daily, making them ideal for outdoor gardens or indoor spaces with natural light. They prefer warm, dry conditions and can tolerate humid or wet environments.

Remember, proper lighting is crucial for growth, as insufficient light can cause leggy or pale growth, while excessive sunlight can cause scorching or sunburn. 

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Cheiridopsis candidissima

sku: 2414

Regular price$ 11.49
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Please note: All Landscape Ready plants that are in a 6-inch pot or larger WILL NOT come with a pot as it will be shipped bare root.

  • In stock, ready to ship
  • Inventory on the way

Please note: Our large plants are many years old, and as a result, they might have minor scaring but will arrive 100% healthy and looking great.

Please note: Our large plants are shipped bare root. They are also many years old, and as a result, they might have minor scaring but will arrive healthy and looking great.

If you live in a cold climate and are expecting temperatures below 40 degrees within the next five days after placing your order, we highly recommend adding a heat pack to your order. If you do not order a heat pack, we do not send one with your order.

BUY HEAT PACKS HERE

**FREE HEAT PACK WITH ORDERS OVER $50 before taxes and shipping- BY REQUEST ONLY, PLEASE MAKE A NOTE ON YOUR ORDER.

To prevent plants from freezing while in transit, orders placed for areas with extreme severe freezing temperatures will be held for shipment until it is safe to ship.

Plants that are in 3.5" pots and smaller will be shipped in its pot to prevent any damage to the roots. Any plant that is 6" and larger WILL NOT come with a pot as it will be shipped bare root.

Depending on the species and season, you will receive a very similar plant to the one in the picture. It may or may not be blooming at the time of your purchase.

We ship via USPS Priority Mail, and we calculate the shipping cost based on the weight and volume of your purchase. Care instructions are included in every package you order. Please allow us up to 3 business days to process your order. Depending on your location, we will ship the plants on a certain day to avoid transit time during weekends or holidays. If you wish to receive your order on a specific date, or have special instructions, please add a note on your order. If you have any questions or comments, please feel free to contact us at any time.

  • Description
  • Key Plant Features

Imagine stumbling upon a miniature wonderland where nature's creativity knows no bounds. Welcome to the world of the Lobster Claw plant - also known as Cheiridopsis candidissima! Because of its dense mat of spiky foliage, it is also mistakenly known as Cheiridopsis denticulata or carpet weed. 

This cheiridopsis succulent plant gets its common name, "lobster claws," from the shape of its leaves, which are thick and fleshy with pointed tips that resemble the claws of a lobster and turn reddish-purple under sunlight. 

Hailing from South Africa, it’s a member of the Aizoaceae family, which is also known as the ice plant family. It flourishes in sandy soil and dry riverbeds, sporting the most enchanting name derived from the Greek word 'cheiris,' meaning 'sleeve.' This is because when the erect, upright leaves pair begin to dry out in the summer, they resemble a protective sleeve around the succulent. It can grow up to 4 inches tall and up to 12 inches wide. 

This lobster plant is active in the winter, so when the temperature begins to fall, lobster claw flowers begin to bloom. The flowers have striking hues that range from yellow to purple. It is simple to grow from cuttings or seeds. 

Watering Needs 

The lobster claw is a drought-tolerant plant that doesn't need much water to thrive. In fact, overwatering can be detrimental to the lobster claw's plant health. As a general rule, it's best to wait until the soil is completely dry before watering your succulent plant again. This can take anywhere from a few days to a few weeks, depending on the climate and growing conditions. 

When you do water your lobster claws, it's important to water it deeply and thoroughly. This will encourage the giant lobster claw to develop a strong root system and will help it withstand periods of drought. Since they are active in the winter, they require more frequent watering when it is cold outside. However, you should avoid getting water on the leaves, as this can cause the powdery coating to rub off and can lead to rot or disease. 

Light Requirement 

The lobster claws require full sun to partial shade, making it an excellent choice for outdoor gardens or indoor spaces with plenty of natural light. It can tolerate a wide range of temperatures, but it prefers warm, dry conditions and can suffer in humid or wet environments. 

When growing Cheiridopsis candidissima indoors, it's important to place the plant in a sunny window or under a grow light to ensure it receives enough light. If this isn't getting enough light, it may become leggy or pale, and its growth may slow down. Conversely, if your lobster claw plant is getting too much direct sunlight, it may become scorched or sunburned. 

Optimal Soil & Fertilizer Needs 

The lobster claw plant prefers well-draining soil that is rich in nutrients. A sandy or gravelly soil mix is ideal, as it will allow excess water to drain away quickly and prevent the plant from becoming waterlogged. You can also improve drainage by adding perlite or coarse sand to your soil mix. Instead, make or buy a well-draining potting mix, or ideally use our specialized succulent potting mix that contains 5 natural substrates and mycorrhizae to promote the development of a strong root system that helps your succulent to thrive. 

When it comes to fertilizing Cheiridopsis candidissima, less is more. This giant lobster claw doesn't require a lot of nutrients to thrive, and over-fertilizing can actually harm its growth. You can use a balanced fertilizer once a year in the spring with an equal mix of NPK (5-10-5). 

Hardiness Zone & More 

The lobster claws can withstand temperatures as low as 20 degrees Fahrenheit and are well-suited for USDA hardiness zones 8 to 11.It thrives in cold climates because it is active during the winter. If you have mild winters, you can even put it outside.  

However, Cheiridopsis candidissima is native to South Africa and is adapted to hot, dry conditions. It can tolerate a wide range of temperatures, but it prefers warm, dry conditions and can suffer in humid or wet environments. If you're growing it indoors, make sure to place it in a spot with plenty of natural light and good air circulation to help prevent the buildup of excess moisture. 

Don't miss out on adding the Cheiridopsis candidissima - Lobster Claws to your garden! Order now and enjoy its beauty for years to come.

Bloom Season Winter
Botanical Name Cheiridopsis candidissima
Common Name Lobster claw plant
Dormancy Summer
Family Aizoaceae
Flower Color Yellow, purple
Genus Cheiridopsis
Growth Habit Rosette
Growth Rate Slow
Hardiness Zone 8, 9, 10, 11
Mature Size 4 in. tall, 12 in. wide
Native Area South Africa
Plant Type Perennial succulent
Propagation By cuttings, seeds
Resistance Drought tolerant, pest resistant, deer resistance, mild frost tolerant
Soil PH 6.5, Acidic, Neutral
Soil Type specialized succulent potting mix
Special Features Showy flowers
Sun Exposure Full sun, Partial shade
Watering Needs Low

Pests & Common Problems of Lobster Claw Plant

The lobster claw plant is a hardy plant that is generally resistant to pests and diseases. However, there are a few common problems that you may encounter when growing this succulent. Following are some of the most typical problems and solutions: 

Overwatering: Cheiridopsis candidissima is adapted to hot, dry conditions and can suffer if it's overwatered. To prevent this issue, make sure to allow the soil to dry out completely between waterings, and reduce watering the lobster claw plant during the summer months when it's dormant. 

Mealybugs: Mealybugs are a common pest that can infest Cheiridopsis. These insects look like small, white, cottony masses and can be found on the leaves and stems of the giant lobster claw.

To get rid of mealybugs, you can use a cotton swab dipped in rubbing alcohol to remove them from the lobster claw plant. 

Scale insects: Scale insects are another common pest that can infest the lobster claw plant. These insects look like small, brown , or black bumps on the leaves and stems of the plant.

To get rid of scale insects, you can use a cotton swab dipped in rubbing alcohol to remove them from the succulent. 

FAQs - Lobster Claw Plant

How do you propagate cheiridopsis? 

Cheiridopsis candidissima can be propagated from seeds or cuttings. If you're propagating from seeds, you can sow them in a well-draining soil mix and keep them moist until they germinate.

If you're propagating from cuttings, you can take stem cuttings in the spring or summer and allow them to dry out for a few days before planting them in a well-draining soil mix. Make sure to keep the soil moist until the cuttings take root. 

How tall does the lobster claw plant get? 

The lobster claws plant - Cheiridopsis candidissima can grow up to 12 inches in diameter. It can be grown in containers or in the ground in tropical climates and is often used as a decorative plant in tropical-themed settings.

The plant gets its common name, "lobster claws," from the shape of its leaves, which are thick and fleshy with pointed tips that resemble the claws of a lobster and turn reddish-purple under sunlight. 

Does the lobster claw plant like direct sunlight? 

The lobster claw plant thrives in full sun to partial shade for at least 4-6 hours daily, making them ideal for outdoor gardens or indoor spaces with natural light. They prefer warm, dry conditions and can tolerate humid or wet environments.

Remember, proper lighting is crucial for growth, as insufficient light can cause leggy or pale growth, while excessive sunlight can cause scorching or sunburn. 

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