Golden Toothed Aloe - Aloe nobilis
Golden Toothed Aloe - Aloe nobilis
Golden Toothed Aloe - Aloe nobilis
Golden Toothed Aloe - Aloe nobilis
Golden Toothed Aloe - Aloe nobilis
Golden Toothed Aloe - Aloe nobilis
Golden Toothed Aloe - Aloe nobilis
Golden Toothed Aloe - Aloe nobilis
Golden Toothed Aloe - Aloe nobilis
Golden Toothed Aloe - Aloe nobilis
Golden Toothed Aloe - Aloe nobilis
Golden Toothed Aloe - Aloe nobilis

Welcome to the world of the Golden toothed aloe - also known as 'Aloe nobilis' a stunning perennial, evergreen succulent that captures attention with its vibrant colors and unique texture! Its sharp but flexible green and gold crown-toothed edges at the broadly triangular leaves give this aloe nobilis its common name golden toothed aloe. The variegated form of Aloe nobilis, known as Aloe nobilis variegata, has leaves with unique patterns of green and white or cream-colored stripes. So, in terms of species, they are the same, but the variegated form has a distinct appearance. 

Belongs to the Asphodelaceae family, Some people speculate that Aloe nobilis could be a cross between Aloe mitriformis and Aloe brevifolia, or from Aloe distans or Aloe arborescens. However, it should be noted that this is merely speculation and not a scientifically confirmed hybrid. It is commonly used in landscaping and is often confused with Aloe perfoliata but is distinguished by smaller rosettes and light green leaves. 

The fleshy, green leaves of the aloe nobilis can change color to orange or rose under stress or in direct sunlight. This aloe species is native to South Africa and features rosettes of fleshy, golden, or yellow edges on its toothed triangular leaves that can grow up to 12 inches long and up to 4 feet wide. 

The Golden Toothed Aloe produces tall flower spikes that emerge from the center of the rosette. These spikes can reach heights of up to 2 feet and are adorned with tubular, orange-red flowers. These tubular flowers bloom in the summer. The blooms attract pollinators such as bees and hummingbirds, adding a touch of liveliness to any garden or indoor space. This slow-growing aloe plant takes about 3 to 4 years to reach maturity. If grown outdoors, it may take slightly less time because of the climatic conditions. 

The aloe nobilis is well-suited for rock gardens, succulent arrangements, or as a focal point in a container garden. Aloenobilispropagationcan be grown through seeds, leaf cuttings, and offsets. This succulent produces many offsets that appear at its base. Sometimes, the tops of the leaves can often become brown and start to die. Since this is a normal part of the growing process, all you have to do is remove the dried-out brown tips.  

This plant is a popular skincare ingredient and has skin-soothing and moisturizing properties. It also contains vitamins and antioxidants, making it an effective ingredient for skin creams. 

The care needs of this nobilis gold tooth aloe is the same as for the well-known aloe variety "aloe vera."   

Watering Needs

When watering the Aloe nobilis, it's important to strike a balance. As a drought-tolerant plant, you should water the 'Gold-Tooth Aloe' 1-3 days a week. For the bestaloe nobilis care,look out for underwatering and overwatering. This succulent plant prefers a "soak and dry" method. In order to avoid overwatering, which may result in root rot, let the soil completely dry out in between irrigations.  

When watering, make sure to thoroughly saturate the soil and then let it dry out before watering again. During the active growing season, which is typically spring and summer, you can water more frequently. However, in the dormant period, which is usually fall and winter, reduce watering to avoid waterlogged soil. 

To determine when to water, check the moisture level of the soil by sticking your finger about an inch into the soil. If the soil feels dry at that depth, it's time to water it again. In addition to proper watering, it's important to provide good drainage for this aloe plant. Plant it in well-draining soil and ensure that the pot has drainage holes to prevent water from sitting in the bottom. If you're unsure about the moisture levels, it's always safer to underwater and adjust accordingly based on the plant's response. 

Light Requirements

The Aloe nobilis thrives in bright full sun to light shade. It prefers a sunny spot where it can receive several 4-6 hours of sunlight each day. However, it's important to protect it from direct, intense sunlight for prolonged periods, especially during the hottest parts of the day. Direct sunlight can lead to leaves turning orange or the plant developing burn marks. 

If you're growing the Aloe nobilis indoors, place it near a window that receives bright, indirect light. South-facing or west-facing windows are usually ideal. If you notice that the leaves are stretching or leaning towards the light source, it may be an indication that it needs more light. In that case, consider moving it to a brighter location or supplementing it with artificial grow lights. 

Remember to rotate your aloe nobilis plant occasionally to ensure even exposure to light and prevent it from leaning towards one side. With the right amount of light, your Aloe nobilis will thrive and display its beautiful, vibrant colors.

Optimal Soil & Fertilizer Needs

The Aloe nobilis favors very airy, sandy, or gravelly soil that drains well. Planting them in standard potting soil will result in compacted roots, stunted growth, and most likely root rot. Instead, make or buy a well-draining potting mix, or ideally use our specialized succulent potting mix that contains 5 natural substrates and mycorrhizae to promote the development of a strong root system that helps your gold tooth aloe to thrive. 

Ideally, you should look for a natural fertilizer with an approximate blend of 5-10-5 that is higher in phosphorus than nitrogen for your Aloe nobilis. The best choice is to use a Natural fertilizer as they last longer and keep your soil alive by adding other beneficial compounds and microbes that encourage aloe plant health and nutrient absorption. 

Hardiness Zone & More

The golden-toothed aloe nobilis is generally cold hardy in USDA hardiness zones 9 to 11. These zones are characterized by mild to warm climates with winter temperatures that rarely dip below freezing. If you live in a colder climate, it's best to grow the Aloe nobilis as a houseplant or in a container that can be brought indoors during the winter months. 

In areas with colder winters, it's important to protect the Aloe nobilis from frost and freezing temperatures. If you choose to keep your nobilis gold tooth aloe outdoors, make sure to bring it inside or provide some form of protection, such as covering it with a frost cloth or moving it to a sheltered location. Alternatively, you can keep this aloe nobilis gold tooth indoors year-round, where you have more control over the temperature and can provide the ideal conditions for its growth. 

Remember, it's always a good idea to check your specific hardiness zone and local climate conditions to determine the best approach for growing the Nobilis aloe in your area. With proper aloe care and protection, you can enjoy the beauty of these succulent plants regardless of your hardiness zone. 

Don't miss out on adding the Aloe nobilis - golden-toothed aloe to your garden! Order now and enjoy its beauty for years to come.

Bloom Season Summer
Botanical Name Aloe nobilis
Common Name Golden toothed aloe
Common Name Golden toothed aloe, gold tooth aloe
Dormancy Winter
Family Asphodelaceae
Flower Color Bright orange
Flower Color Bright orange, red
Genus Aloe
Growth Habit Broadly triangular
Growth Habit Rosette
Growth Rate Slow
Growth Rate Slow growth
Hardiness Zone 7b
Hardiness Zone 9, 10, 11
Mature Size 24 in. tall, 4 ft. wide
Mature Size 6" – 1'
Native Area South Africa
Plant Type Perennial succulent
Propagation By cuttings, offsets
Resistance 6.7° C
Resistance Drought tolerant, deer resistance, rabbit resistance, heat tolerant
Soil PH 6.5, Acidic, Neutral
Soil Type specialized succulent potting mix
Special Features Broad triangular leaves
Sun Exposure Full sun, Partial shade
Sun Exposure Partial shade
Toxicity Safe for humans, friendly to dogs, friendly to cats
Watering Needs Moderate

Pests & Common Problems of Aloe nobilis

The Aloe nobilis - gold tooth aloe can be susceptible to a few pests and common problems: 

Mealybugs: These small, white, cottony insects can infest the leaves and stems of your gold tooth aloe. Use a cotton swab soaked in rubbing alcohol to remove them or use an insecticidal soap. 

Scale insects: These pests appear as small, brown, or black bumps on the leaves and stems of your gold tooth aloe. Use a soft brush or cloth dipped in soapy water to remove them or apply insecticidal oil. 

Root rot: Overwatering or poorly draining soil can lead to root rot, causing the roots to become mushy and the golden-toothed aloe plant to wilt. Make sure the soil has good drainage, and only water the plant when the top inch of soil feels dry. 

Leaf spots: Fungal infections or bacterial diseases can cause dark spots or discoloration on the leaves. Avoid overhead watering and ensure good air circulation around the gold tooth aloe. 

Leaf drying: Insufficient watering or too much direct sunlight can cause the leaves to dry out and turn brown. Water the gold tooth aloe deeply but allow the soil to dry out between waterings. Provide filtered or indirect sunlight.  

By monitoring your Aloe nobilis golden tooth aloe regularly and taking prompt action against pests or problems, you can help keep your plant healthy growth and thriving.  

FAQs - Aloe nobilis Plant

Is Aloe nobilis good for the skin? 

Yes, Aloe nobilis (gold tooth aloe) can be beneficial for the skin because of its soothing and moisturizing properties. It contains various vitamins and antioxidants that can help soothe and moisturize the skin, making it a popular ingredient in skincare products.  

Additionally, its anti-inflammatory properties may also aid in reducing redness and irritation on the skin. However, everyone's skin is unique, so it's always a good idea to do a patch test before applying any new product to your skin. 

How big do aloe nobilis get? 

Aloe nobilis, commonly known as the gold tooth aloe, typically grows to a moderate size. It can reach a height of about 12 inches and spreads outwards in a rosette shape of about 2 feet. These aloe nobilis leaves are thick and succulent, featuring vibrant green coloration with distinctive golden edges. 

Why is my aloe nobilis turning brown? 

There could be a few reasons why your Aloe nobilis (gold tooth aloe) is turning brown. It could be due to overwatering, which can cause root rot and lead to browning of the leaves. Another possibility is too much direct sunlight, as excessive sun exposure can cause the leaves to dry out and turn brown.  

Ensure that you are watering your golden-toothed aloe plant appropriately and providing it with the right amount of sunlight. 

How do you propagate aloe nobilis? 

You can propagate Aloe nobilis (gold tooth aloe) using offsets or leaf cuttings. For offsets, carefully remove the smaller plants that grow around the base of the main plant and replant them in well-draining soil.  

For leaf cuttings, remove a healthy leaf from the plant, let it dry for a few days, and then place it in a pot with well-draining soil. Keep the soil lightly moist and wait for new roots to develop.

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Golden Toothed Aloe - Aloe nobilis

sku: 524

6 reviews
Regular price$ 12.79
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Shipping calculated at checkout.

Size

Please note: All Landscape Ready plants that are in a 6-inch pot or larger WILL NOT come with a pot as it will be shipped bare root.

  • In stock, ready to ship
  • Inventory on the way

Please note: Our large plants are many years old, and as a result, they might have minor scaring but will arrive 100% healthy and looking great.

Please note: Our large plants are shipped bare root. They are also many years old, and as a result, they might have minor scaring but will arrive healthy and looking great.

sku:
Detailed description of this plant is below...

If you live in a cold climate and are expecting temperatures below 40 degrees within the next five days after placing your order, we highly recommend adding a heat pack to your order. If you do not order a heat pack, we do not send one with your order.

BUY HEAT PACKS HERE

**FREE HEAT PACK WITH ORDERS OVER $50 before taxes and shipping- BY REQUEST ONLY, PLEASE MAKE A NOTE ON YOUR ORDER.

To prevent plants from freezing while in transit, orders placed for areas with extreme severe freezing temperatures will be held for shipment until it is safe to ship.

Plants that are in 3.5" pots and smaller will be shipped in its pot to prevent any damage to the roots. Any plant that is 6" and larger WILL NOT come with a pot as it will be shipped bare root.

Depending on the species and season, you will receive a very similar plant to the one in the picture. It may or may not be blooming at the time of your purchase.

We ship via USPS Priority Mail, and we calculate the shipping cost based on the weight and volume of your purchase. Care instructions are included in every package you order. Please allow us up to 3 business days to process your order. Depending on your location, we will ship the plants on a certain day to avoid transit time during weekends or holidays. If you wish to receive your order on a specific date, or have special instructions, please add a note on your order. If you have any questions or comments, please feel free to contact us at any time.

  • Description
  • Key Plant Features

Welcome to the world of the Golden toothed aloe - also known as 'Aloe nobilis' a stunning perennial, evergreen succulent that captures attention with its vibrant colors and unique texture! Its sharp but flexible green and gold crown-toothed edges at the broadly triangular leaves give this aloe nobilis its common name golden toothed aloe. The variegated form of Aloe nobilis, known as Aloe nobilis variegata, has leaves with unique patterns of green and white or cream-colored stripes. So, in terms of species, they are the same, but the variegated form has a distinct appearance. 

Belongs to the Asphodelaceae family, Some people speculate that Aloe nobilis could be a cross between Aloe mitriformis and Aloe brevifolia, or from Aloe distans or Aloe arborescens. However, it should be noted that this is merely speculation and not a scientifically confirmed hybrid. It is commonly used in landscaping and is often confused with Aloe perfoliata but is distinguished by smaller rosettes and light green leaves. 

The fleshy, green leaves of the aloe nobilis can change color to orange or rose under stress or in direct sunlight. This aloe species is native to South Africa and features rosettes of fleshy, golden, or yellow edges on its toothed triangular leaves that can grow up to 12 inches long and up to 4 feet wide. 

The Golden Toothed Aloe produces tall flower spikes that emerge from the center of the rosette. These spikes can reach heights of up to 2 feet and are adorned with tubular, orange-red flowers. These tubular flowers bloom in the summer. The blooms attract pollinators such as bees and hummingbirds, adding a touch of liveliness to any garden or indoor space. This slow-growing aloe plant takes about 3 to 4 years to reach maturity. If grown outdoors, it may take slightly less time because of the climatic conditions. 

The aloe nobilis is well-suited for rock gardens, succulent arrangements, or as a focal point in a container garden. Aloenobilispropagationcan be grown through seeds, leaf cuttings, and offsets. This succulent produces many offsets that appear at its base. Sometimes, the tops of the leaves can often become brown and start to die. Since this is a normal part of the growing process, all you have to do is remove the dried-out brown tips.  

This plant is a popular skincare ingredient and has skin-soothing and moisturizing properties. It also contains vitamins and antioxidants, making it an effective ingredient for skin creams. 

The care needs of this nobilis gold tooth aloe is the same as for the well-known aloe variety "aloe vera."   

Watering Needs

When watering the Aloe nobilis, it's important to strike a balance. As a drought-tolerant plant, you should water the 'Gold-Tooth Aloe' 1-3 days a week. For the bestaloe nobilis care,look out for underwatering and overwatering. This succulent plant prefers a "soak and dry" method. In order to avoid overwatering, which may result in root rot, let the soil completely dry out in between irrigations.  

When watering, make sure to thoroughly saturate the soil and then let it dry out before watering again. During the active growing season, which is typically spring and summer, you can water more frequently. However, in the dormant period, which is usually fall and winter, reduce watering to avoid waterlogged soil. 

To determine when to water, check the moisture level of the soil by sticking your finger about an inch into the soil. If the soil feels dry at that depth, it's time to water it again. In addition to proper watering, it's important to provide good drainage for this aloe plant. Plant it in well-draining soil and ensure that the pot has drainage holes to prevent water from sitting in the bottom. If you're unsure about the moisture levels, it's always safer to underwater and adjust accordingly based on the plant's response. 

Light Requirements

The Aloe nobilis thrives in bright full sun to light shade. It prefers a sunny spot where it can receive several 4-6 hours of sunlight each day. However, it's important to protect it from direct, intense sunlight for prolonged periods, especially during the hottest parts of the day. Direct sunlight can lead to leaves turning orange or the plant developing burn marks. 

If you're growing the Aloe nobilis indoors, place it near a window that receives bright, indirect light. South-facing or west-facing windows are usually ideal. If you notice that the leaves are stretching or leaning towards the light source, it may be an indication that it needs more light. In that case, consider moving it to a brighter location or supplementing it with artificial grow lights. 

Remember to rotate your aloe nobilis plant occasionally to ensure even exposure to light and prevent it from leaning towards one side. With the right amount of light, your Aloe nobilis will thrive and display its beautiful, vibrant colors.

Optimal Soil & Fertilizer Needs

The Aloe nobilis favors very airy, sandy, or gravelly soil that drains well. Planting them in standard potting soil will result in compacted roots, stunted growth, and most likely root rot. Instead, make or buy a well-draining potting mix, or ideally use our specialized succulent potting mix that contains 5 natural substrates and mycorrhizae to promote the development of a strong root system that helps your gold tooth aloe to thrive. 

Ideally, you should look for a natural fertilizer with an approximate blend of 5-10-5 that is higher in phosphorus than nitrogen for your Aloe nobilis. The best choice is to use a Natural fertilizer as they last longer and keep your soil alive by adding other beneficial compounds and microbes that encourage aloe plant health and nutrient absorption. 

Hardiness Zone & More

The golden-toothed aloe nobilis is generally cold hardy in USDA hardiness zones 9 to 11. These zones are characterized by mild to warm climates with winter temperatures that rarely dip below freezing. If you live in a colder climate, it's best to grow the Aloe nobilis as a houseplant or in a container that can be brought indoors during the winter months. 

In areas with colder winters, it's important to protect the Aloe nobilis from frost and freezing temperatures. If you choose to keep your nobilis gold tooth aloe outdoors, make sure to bring it inside or provide some form of protection, such as covering it with a frost cloth or moving it to a sheltered location. Alternatively, you can keep this aloe nobilis gold tooth indoors year-round, where you have more control over the temperature and can provide the ideal conditions for its growth. 

Remember, it's always a good idea to check your specific hardiness zone and local climate conditions to determine the best approach for growing the Nobilis aloe in your area. With proper aloe care and protection, you can enjoy the beauty of these succulent plants regardless of your hardiness zone. 

Don't miss out on adding the Aloe nobilis - golden-toothed aloe to your garden! Order now and enjoy its beauty for years to come.

Bloom Season Summer
Botanical Name Aloe nobilis
Common Name Golden toothed aloe
Common Name Golden toothed aloe, gold tooth aloe
Dormancy Winter
Family Asphodelaceae
Flower Color Bright orange
Flower Color Bright orange, red
Genus Aloe
Growth Habit Broadly triangular
Growth Habit Rosette
Growth Rate Slow
Growth Rate Slow growth
Hardiness Zone 7b
Hardiness Zone 9, 10, 11
Mature Size 24 in. tall, 4 ft. wide
Mature Size 6" – 1'
Native Area South Africa
Plant Type Perennial succulent
Propagation By cuttings, offsets
Resistance 6.7° C
Resistance Drought tolerant, deer resistance, rabbit resistance, heat tolerant
Soil PH 6.5, Acidic, Neutral
Soil Type specialized succulent potting mix
Special Features Broad triangular leaves
Sun Exposure Full sun, Partial shade
Sun Exposure Partial shade
Toxicity Safe for humans, friendly to dogs, friendly to cats
Watering Needs Moderate

Pests & Common Problems of Aloe nobilis

The Aloe nobilis - gold tooth aloe can be susceptible to a few pests and common problems: 

Mealybugs: These small, white, cottony insects can infest the leaves and stems of your gold tooth aloe. Use a cotton swab soaked in rubbing alcohol to remove them or use an insecticidal soap. 

Scale insects: These pests appear as small, brown, or black bumps on the leaves and stems of your gold tooth aloe. Use a soft brush or cloth dipped in soapy water to remove them or apply insecticidal oil. 

Root rot: Overwatering or poorly draining soil can lead to root rot, causing the roots to become mushy and the golden-toothed aloe plant to wilt. Make sure the soil has good drainage, and only water the plant when the top inch of soil feels dry. 

Leaf spots: Fungal infections or bacterial diseases can cause dark spots or discoloration on the leaves. Avoid overhead watering and ensure good air circulation around the gold tooth aloe. 

Leaf drying: Insufficient watering or too much direct sunlight can cause the leaves to dry out and turn brown. Water the gold tooth aloe deeply but allow the soil to dry out between waterings. Provide filtered or indirect sunlight.  

By monitoring your Aloe nobilis golden tooth aloe regularly and taking prompt action against pests or problems, you can help keep your plant healthy growth and thriving.  

FAQs - Aloe nobilis Plant

Is Aloe nobilis good for the skin? 

Yes, Aloe nobilis (gold tooth aloe) can be beneficial for the skin because of its soothing and moisturizing properties. It contains various vitamins and antioxidants that can help soothe and moisturize the skin, making it a popular ingredient in skincare products.  

Additionally, its anti-inflammatory properties may also aid in reducing redness and irritation on the skin. However, everyone's skin is unique, so it's always a good idea to do a patch test before applying any new product to your skin. 

How big do aloe nobilis get? 

Aloe nobilis, commonly known as the gold tooth aloe, typically grows to a moderate size. It can reach a height of about 12 inches and spreads outwards in a rosette shape of about 2 feet. These aloe nobilis leaves are thick and succulent, featuring vibrant green coloration with distinctive golden edges. 

Why is my aloe nobilis turning brown? 

There could be a few reasons why your Aloe nobilis (gold tooth aloe) is turning brown. It could be due to overwatering, which can cause root rot and lead to browning of the leaves. Another possibility is too much direct sunlight, as excessive sun exposure can cause the leaves to dry out and turn brown.  

Ensure that you are watering your golden-toothed aloe plant appropriately and providing it with the right amount of sunlight. 

How do you propagate aloe nobilis? 

You can propagate Aloe nobilis (gold tooth aloe) using offsets or leaf cuttings. For offsets, carefully remove the smaller plants that grow around the base of the main plant and replant them in well-draining soil.  

For leaf cuttings, remove a healthy leaf from the plant, let it dry for a few days, and then place it in a pot with well-draining soil. Keep the soil lightly moist and wait for new roots to develop.

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